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I am new here and I signed up because I am in desperate need of some answers. I bought a 1996 Intrepid that was hit in the front. Fairly minor, air bags didn't go off. It needed the fascia, headlight, right fender and hood. When I first got it I started it to make sure that the engine would fire before I put any money in it. Started right up and ran good. After about two months of working on it and letting it sit I have it back together and it doesn't start. It cranks and cranks but doesn't even try to start. I pulled the airbox out again to make sure the computer was plugged in all the way so that is out now but it doesn't do anything. The only thing that I can think of is that maybe the fuel cutoff switch or inertia switch I guess it is called, may need reset. Anyone know where this switch is? We did load it on a trailer and pulled the frame rail to get things to line up so maybe it was enough to trip the switch.

Anyone have any ideas?
 

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Can't even get the check engine light to come on. Sometimes when I turn the key back and forth to get the codes the check engine light will flash once but that is it.
 

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ok your on the right track,, no check eng light,, check your fuses,, sounds like no power to the ecm,, good luck
 

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Inspected fuses, swapped around with other fuses, no luck. I wonder if it is the ECM itself.
 

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Do you have fuel pressure? Do you have spark to the plugs?
Help me out here so I can help you.
 

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No idea. I am not used to new cars and how to check this stuff. How would I check the fuel pressure on these things.
 

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I know Fords used to have inertia switches. Kinda like a circuit breaker that trips when there's an impact. I haven't known of any other car company that used them. I thought GM, did but never saw one on a GM product.

Some of the suggestions so far are good. Another item is a security system. Not sure if the 1st gen's had a factory security, but some of the 2nd gen's do. One of the features is a starter cut-off which (obviously) won't allow the car to be started. That's an idea. How long did it sit for since the last time you started it? How well is the battery charge?
 

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Godsil, I don't know what to tell you except you're gonna be like a dog chasing his tail at this rate.

You gotta start thinking clearly on how to narrow down the candidates before you start blurting out any possible thing it could be.

I'd probably start with fuel. When you turn the car to "on" does the fuel pump come on (do you hear it buzz)? If it does is it reaching the injectors? You need a fuel pressure tester to verify but you might try disconnecting the fuel line at the filter and aiming it into a bucket while you turn the car to "on". If fuel doesn't spit into the bucket you know you definitely have a fuel issue. Obviously, I seriously would prefer the fuel pressure gauge over this idea.

As for spark, there's a number of ways to test for this- you can use an inductive timing light, a $2 spark tester from autozone, or just unscrew a plug from the cylinder head, reconnect the wire, and use pliers to hold the plug near a ground while you start the engine. No spark= you have a coil or wire issue.


If you have fuel AND spark, I'd probably re-check that your wires are on the correct terminals on the coil.
You also don't mention what work specifically you did on the engine between getting the car and starting it up recently. This would help tremendously.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
The only engine work I did was change the power steering pump due to a broken pulley. Other than that the only thing I did was disconnect the airbox, ECM (if that is what is next to the carbon canister), and headlights to change the fender and front fascia.

I don't hear a fuel pump at all when I turn the key.
 

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Ok since you disconnected the ECM, you should take alook at that connection again. Take it back off and plug her back in. Also take alook at the ASD Relay to see if it bad too. And one last thing, how's the batt. ? Check the connections there too.
 

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OK, now we are getting somewhere.

Your car is not starting because no fuel is getting to it. I agree with above poster, ECM is strongly suspect because you messed with it (though I have absolutely no idea why you would possibly have needed to unplug it for the work you've done.)

It seems obvious that the PCM is most likely- recheck PCM fuse and connections. If you really can't find anything, you're gonna have to just rule out a freaky coincidence with the fuel pump by probing the wires at the connection for the fuel pump and verifying voltage is present when ignition is turned to on. But I really think this is unlikely- but you have to rule it out

Other things can cause this too- if you unplugged the CPS or CKPS (Crankshaft or Camshaft position sensors) and didn't plug them back in the car will not start. You might even consider "backtracking" your procedure and ensure you connected everything.
But again, I see absolutely no reason you'd have had to disconnect these sensors for the work you said you did, but actually for that very same reason I'm really leaning towards you not reconnecting something.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My dad's friend came over tonight and looked at it. We have fuel but no power to the coil. Is there a fuseable link or anything in there? We checked all the fuses and they all look good.
 

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Check out the ASD Relay. It's located in the Relay box next to the Batt.
 

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Maybe this will also help you:

Diagnosis and Testing
Chrysler Concorde/Intrepid/LHS/New Yorker/Vision 1993-1997

FAILURE-TO-START TEST

See Figure 1

This no-start test checks the camshaft position sensor and the crankshaft position sensor. Refer to the ignition coil tests before commencing with this test, much time may be saved if the problem lies within the coil.

The PCM supplies 8.0 volts to the camshaft position sensor and crankshaft position sensor through one circuit. If the 8.0 volt supply circuit shorts to ground, neither sensor will produce a signal (output voltage to the PCM).

When the ignition key is turned and left in the ON position, the PCM automatically energizes the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay. However, the PCM de-energizes the relay within one second because it has not received a crankshaft position sensor signal indicating engine rotation.

During cranking, the ASD relay will not energize until the PCM receives a crankshaft signal. Secondly, the ASD relay remains energized only if the PCM senses a camshaft position sensor signal immediately after detecting the crankshaft position sensor signal.

Check battery voltage with a voltmeter. Make sure to always attach the positive voltmeter wire to the positive (+) terminal of the component being checked. Do the same with the negative - wire also. Voltage for the battery should be approximately 12.66 volts or higher to perform the failure-to-start test.

Unplug the harness connector from the coil pack.

Connect a test light (or voltmeter) to the B+ (battery voltage) terminal of the coil electrical connector and ground. The wire for the B+ terminal is dark green with a orange tracer.


Fig. 1: Attach the 12 volt test light to the B+ (battery voltage) terminal of the coil electrical connector and ground



Turn the ignition key to the ON position. The test light should flash on and then off. DO NOT turn the key to the OFF position, leave it in the ON position.

If the test light flashes momentarily, the PCM grounded the ASD relay. Proceed to Step 5.

If the test light did not flash, the ASD relay did not energize. The cause is either the relay itself or one of the relay circuits. Test the circuits for a ground or open circuit, Refer to Chassis Electrical for further electrical information on circuits. Since Chrysler does not give a procedure for testing the relay with a voltmeter, ohmmeter or test light, have the component tested at a reputable automotive service center familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

Crank the engine. If the key was placed in the OFF position after Step 4, turn the ignition to the ON position before cranking the engine. Wait for the test light to flash once, then crank the engine.

If the test light momentarily flashes during cranking, the PCM is not receiving a camshaft position sensor signal. Test the camshaft position sensor circuits for a ground or open circuit, Refer to Chassis Electrical for further electrical information on circuits. Since Chrysler does not give a procedure for testing the camshaft position sensor with a voltmeter, ohmmeter or test light, have the component tested at a reputable automotive service center familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

If the test light did not flash during cranking, unplug the camshaft position sensor connector. Turn the ignition key to the OFF position. Turn the key to the ON position, wait for the test light to momentarily flash once, then crank the engine. If the test light momentarily flashes, the camshaft position sensor is shorted and must be replaced with a new one. If the light did not flash, the cause of the no-start is in either the crankshaft position sensor/camshaft position sensor 8.0 volt supply circuit, or the crankshaft position sensor 5 volt output or ground circuits. Have the crankshaft position sensor checked, after checking the sensor circuits for a ground or open circuit, by a reputable automotive service shop familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

Coil Test
See Figures 2, 3 and 4


Fig. 2: The ignition coil connection terminal descriptions




Fig. 3: Check the primary resistance at the electrical connection and the secondary resistance across the coil towers




Fig. 4: Ignition coil terminal identification



Coil one fires cylinders 1 and 4, coil two fires cylinders 2 and 5, coil three fires cylinders 3 and 6 for the 3.3L and 3.5L engines. Each coil tower is labeled with the number of the corresponding cylinder.

Unplug the ignition cables from the coil terminals and the spark plugs. Make certain to label them before removal. Measure the resistance of the cables. Resistance must be between 3,000-12,000 ohms per ft. (30.5 cm) of cable. Replace any cable not within tolerance.

Unplug the electrical wiring harness connector from the coil pack.

Measure the primary resistance of each coil. At the coil, connect an ohmmeter between the B+ pin and the pin corresponding to the cylinders in question. Resistance on the primary side of each coil should be 0.45-0.65 ohms at 21-27°C (70-80°F). A coil not allowed to cool down, could result in inaccurate measurement results. Replace the coil with a new one if the resistance is not within tolerance.

Remove the ignition cables from the secondary towers of the coil. Measure the secondary resistance of the coil between the towers of each individual coil. Resistance for these engines depends on which manufacturer made the coil being tested. If the coil was manufactured by Diamond, the resistance should be 7000-15,800 ohms; if the coil was made by Toyodenso, the resistance should be 7000-15,800 ohms. If the coils' resistance are not within specifications, the coil must be replaced.
 

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Strongt said:
Check out the ASD Relay. It's located in the Relay box next to the Batt.
Oops! I forgot all about that. It feeds power to the coils and O2 sensor heaters and a couple other things.
 
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