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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have SEVERE clanking and clunking when I go over bumps, accelerate, let off the accelerator, and several other instances that I can't think of right now. The engine cradle bushings are COMPLETELY gone, it's loose, has lots of play and metal on metal clanking. I purchased 4 new engine cradle bushings from Rockauto and I'm planning on replacing them on my next off day. Has anyone done this particular job before and can give me any tips/ pointers/advice on anything I should do or NOT do while replacing these?
Sorry for my ignorance, like I said in some other posts, this is my first LH car.
 

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If your replacements are the Dormans, I believe they are crap - I know they are for 2nd gen LH, maybe for 1st gen also. Search for threads that mention "Johnny". He made custom polyurethane cradle bushings I think for both 1st and 2nd gen. Check with him to see if he still has them.

Hopefully your bolts aren't too rusted.

EDIT: Here's Johnny's page on the1st gen bushings: polyurethane FWD Mopar transmission mount
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Peva, thanks for your reply. I'm not sure if they are "Dorman" or not, but if Dormant is what Rockauto sells, then that's what they are. I had to warranty some parts a while back, so I had a credit with Rockauto. Using that merchandise credit, these only cost me about $28. Had I known about the poly ones Johnny sells PRIOR to buying these, I probably would have went that route and saved my Rockauto credit for other parts. Oh well.... These are made out of a yellow "foam" type of material, so I can see why they don't last. But I hope they at least last 5yrs, because I seriously doubt I will even own this car longer than 5yrs. But then again, maybe I will, I guess we will see how reliable it ends up being.
As far as replacing the bushings I already replaced them this past weekend, which was easy and a pain at the same time. Actual replacement was really easy, but getting the engine cradle aligned was a pain. I replaced them one at a time and ended up leaving them very loose until I got all four of them installed so I could get the bolt lined up with the hole. One of the old bushings gave me a LOT of trouble as far as getting it out. The two halves did NOT want to come apart. I was prying on it and hitting it with a hammer but it wouldn't budge. I then decided to just cut it off with a reciprocating saw. And the second I touched the saw blade to it, it literally decided to fall out at that very moment. Lol! I swear, it's as it it got scared of the saw and decided to finally let go. I was laughing and relieved at the same time, since that saved me a few more minutes of work. But anyways, I got them all replaced and the car drives and handles SO much better now without the drivetrain clunking around at every start and stop, and over ever bump. I'm confused as to why the previous owner let them get so bad. The two front bushings only had a small amount of material left on the top half and nothing at all on the bottom. The two rears had absolutely NOTHING left, it was literally just metal on metal slapping back and forth at every stop and start.
My next job/project is to start on the suspension. I plan on replacing the bushings, balljoints, tie rods, struts, and any other bushings I find need replacing.
 

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The Dorman bushings for 1st gen may be OK, but apparently the bushing set for 2nd gen are awful - very poor fit and pretty much unusable according to pretty much every thread/post I read about them. The 2nd gen set came with the bolts (hard to find otherwise), and the general advice was to buy the set just to get the bolts, throw the bushings away, and get the bushings from Johnny. 👍
 

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For the rest of your suspension bushings and other parts (control arms, etc.), I recommend getting them from NAPA. They generally have two or three quality/price levels of any given part - get the 2nd or 3rd level, and prices are reasonable for a significant bump up in quality. There's a lot of junk in aftermarket suspension parts for these cars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can definitely see some cars needing new bolts, ESPECIALLY cars up north in the rust belt. Thankfully we don't have to deal with rust down here in Louisiana, and according to all the paperwork I received with this car, it's lived it's entire life here and had one single owner since 1997. I was easily able to remove the bolts that have been there for 25years and they only have VERY light surface rust on a few of the threads. I didn't even have to use penetrating oil. I did use my DeWalt cordless impact though, which made easy work of it. I re-installed the bolts by hand though, as I was afraid on cross threading any bolts, especially since I had some trouble getting them lined up with the bolt holes.
As far as NAPA, I buy a lot of parts from there. They actually just sent me a 15% off discount code, which I'm glad to share with other members here. "HAPPY15"
Also, if you you the code "NAPATEXT" that will get you $20 off of a $50 or more purchase. I don't know if that code is still good or not, I used it right before Christmas and it was still working.
 

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Great news on a one-owner, relatively corrosion-free LA car - and apparently no flood damage either! 👍

Good on you for sharing the NAPA discount codes!
 

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I have SEVERE clanking and clunking when I go over bumps, accelerate, let off the accelerator, and several other instances that I can't think of right now. The engine cradle bushings are COMPLETELY gone, it's loose, has lots of play and metal on metal clanking......
EDITED: Corrected the subframe bushing bolt size to correctly read M14x2.00x105 (obviously not M1).
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Here's some more info on the 1st Gen cradle bushings (or subframe bushings).

First, for others searching for Intrepid/LH cradle/subrame bushing information, there are dozens of threads on this site with more informaton (the 1st Gen and 2nd Gen bushings are different). A few of the posts have instructions on how to replace them, some with photos like Chewievettes' here:

pg. 6, 1st Gen Polyurethane Cradle Bushings

You can just do an advanced search on "cradle bushings" or "subframe bushings" (with the quotes) in the 1st or 2nd Gen Forum, and read for hours. May also be another one somewhere in the separate 1st Gen How Tos subformum here (lots of great other info though):

The Mopar bushings are still available from some sellers on ebay and the online Chrysler dealers. The annoying thing is that they come in two separate parts (lower and upper) with different part numbers, either for regular or sport suspension as well as (strangely) a few different part numbers depending on the year (see below). However, as far as I know (?) all the 1st Gen year bushings are interchangeable; maybe they changed the the poly material in different years.

According to the website, the blue firmer polyurethane ones possibly still available that have been mentioned and linked by others require salvaging all your hard parts if they aren't too rusted. In any case, I'd derust all the parts (Naval Jelly or other brand phosphoric acid gel works with a bit of time and wire brushing), and paint with Rustoleum. Some of the listings for the other aftermarket ones below say they are polyurethane also, just likely not nearly as firm. The blue poly ones are probably similar to the Mopar Intrepid "Sport Suspension" ones, but those particular Mopar bushings are probably all long gone from ebay and the online Mopar dealers (again, searchable part numbers in the Mopar Parts Catalog).

If anyone is trying to find a replacment Mopar cradle bushing bolt for a rusted one it is in the Parts Catalog as p/n 6502812, a metric bolt size M14x2.00x105. If you use an aftermarket bolt it must be a high strength metric bolt with the "10.9" stamp on the head. Some local NAPA and Carquest stores used to be sources for large bolts like this with all sorts of nuts and bolts in bins, but you may have to search otherwise online for them. (Unfortunately the NAPA site is no where near as good in locating parts or hardware like this as it used to be.) A few good local independent hardware stores still carry high-strength metric bolts, so that's worth checking too.

I removed and reinstalled the OEM bushings on my low-mileage car to de-rust the parts, paint them, and apply anti-seize to the bolts. I used a light coating of anti-seize compound on the threads to prevent the bolt from rusting into the top nut. If you can get in there, also use a small wire brush on that top nut and paint it and the frame around it with Rustoleum rusty metal primer and then a black top coat (both come in pint or quart cans as well as spray). The rule of thumb with anti-seize is that you have to reduce the torque spec in the manual by 20%-25% when tightening the bolt (lots of info on this on-line). Using anti-seize is much better than oil because it adheres to any exposed threads as a rust preventative.

The Dorman 1st Gen bushings are #924-001. (They are obviously different from the 2nd Gen Dorman bushings, that have a different shape.) Amazon and ebay usually have them. The quality is actually hit or miss. I bought two of these, and two of another brand described below. (I don't need them yet on my car.) They are marked with a few other non-Mopar numbers and "China." One of the Dormans is actually a bit firmer than the other. The less firm one has some tiny bubbles/voids visible in the material, so Dorman's China factory source had a quality control problem in their molding process. Here's a picture of the less firm mount - zoom in on right to see the tiny bubbles/voids in the surface:
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Another aftermarket brand for the 1st Gen subframe bushings is "MTC," with part number 30238. These are also on Amazon and ebay. (There's also another brand called "ORC" that I've seen on ebay that looks very similar to the MTC.) The MTCs (and maybe Dormans) also show up if you search on the Mopar p/n 4695759, which is actually just the Mopar part number for the upper half for the 1996, standard suspension. MTCs have that number on the bag along with their own number 30238. Below is a photo of the MTC bushings. The two MTCs I got are both firm feeling like the second Dorman I have (and no tiny bubbles). They have no markings at all. They are definitely different manufacture than the Dormans because the MTCs shaft is zinc-plated (good); the Dorman in the photo above looks like bare steel or maybe some sort of black oxide coating (may be best to paint it anyway inside and out with Rustoleum).
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You can buy either the Dorman or MTC for about $25 (includes top and bottom bushings), but Amazon sometimes has them on sale for $20. Amazon also sometimes crazily raises the prices or either one temporarily to $50 or so (as they do all the time with many other products.) Also on ebay, as usual, some sellers list them for way more.

In the Mopar Parts Catalog '93-'96 as I wrote, the Mopar bushings have different part numbers for the upper and lower parts, and also different part numbers for the standard and sport suspensions (firmer). (Parts Catalog pdf on this site [combined with the 1st Gen Service Manual] in the Service Informaton subforum, or else big paper ones in binders from ebay), . Strangely there are also a few part numbers depending on year. Don't know why the different years would be different Mopar numbers, since the Dormans and MTCs are listed as fitting all 1st Gen cars. The two separate parts do sometimes show up on ebay (usually the uppers) by searching on the part numbers, and some are still available from the online Chrysler/Dodge parts dealers. Here's an ebay UPPER Mopar bushing photo (1996 part number 4695759.)
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From another seller, here's a picture of a set of lightly used Mopar LOWER bushings with the bolts and separate cone-shaped bolt reinforcement piece (without the thin bolt retaining washers on top). They have the 1996 Mopar number stamped on them :
Wood Gas Auto part Metal Still life photography


As for the thin retaining washers, they are listed for the subframe bushing assembly, and shown on the catalog diagram below (#25), as 6100844 (listed as 2 per isolator) "Nut, spring M14x2.00", listed as 8 required. I believe that these are not actually a "nut," just two very thin retaining washers that both go on top of the bolt above the upper bushing and/or frame to retain the bolt (and bushings) if the bolt works loose (see Chewievette's post for a photo). When I removed my good bushings to derust, paint, and apply anti-seize to the bolt, I found that these were mostly rusted to thin flakes, and I didn't bother to replace them (may be able to find some similar at a good hardware store if you want).
Font Art Slope Symmetry Monochrome

Lastly, there is also a part listed as "Reinforcement assembly, (Taping Plate-M14x2)," 04624476 (right side) and 4062477 (left side). I'm guessing that these are replacement plates with the top retaining nut that may be welded into the frame. If the top mounting nut rusts off, these might be the repair part needed. Anyone know about this? I notice online that there ar several similar "reinforcement plates" list for Chrysler vehicle frames. Here is what the 04624477 looked like from one seller. Some of the online Mopar dealers still have them listed as in stock for about $15 plus shipping (the shipping is expensive with most).:

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Below is a better picture of the Mopar replacement frame reinforcement that I believe can be welded in if the top captive nut that the cradle bushing bolt threads into, or the bracket holding it are rusted out. This one is from a bag labeled 04624477. Per the 1st Gen Parts Catalogs, this is for the left, driver's side of the frame. The old captive nut and the collar holding it would obviously have to be cut out first and rust on the frame removed. It should be painted with several coats of anti-rust paint with the weld spots uncoated. Then after welding, paint over the welds and the frame. Since the two parts are probably mirror images, it looks like in a pinch that they might be able to be used interchangably (don't know). I don't need to have this done on my car, but I'm curious if anyone here has done this before, or is there an old post about welding these in? I assume a lot of these nuts get badly rusted.

Parts Catalog listing:
04624476 (Taping Plate-M14x2) Screw, Right
04624477 (Taping Plate-M14x2) Screw, Left

As usual, the NOS for sale listings for these on the Mopar parts sites or ebay may either have them listed with or without the initial zero.


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