DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hi all, my coolant outlet blew off, should i stop there and just re-place or does that mean something else might be wrong- no coolant in oil, no leaks [coolant], 63.000 miles , wife says heat worked, am i missing anything. thanks:poopoo:
 

·
Woober Goobers!
Joined
·
51,014 Posts
It's common for the top of the 2.7L coolant housing to blow off. Seems the glue or whatever means they have to put the pieces together doesn't hold. Just replace it and go from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
i had one of these badboys pop on me in the middle of a roadtrip....



you can have it done in no time. make sure the o-rings are good though. and the white gasket on the bottom ...i did it roadside in less then an hour.


or you can rock some JBweld, but it'll pop again.



check out this profile shot of the SEAM in question. WHAT were they thinking? is this a Sacraficial part?


i feel your pain.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,323 Posts
...WHAT were they thinking? is this a Sacraficial part?...
Just an excellent example of a bad design all around. It has two problems/failure modes: A metal insert (the bleeder seat) molded into plastic that sees pressure combined with thermal cycling, and that seam of the top cap - don't know if it's glued or solvent welded or what, but it also fails, as you showed. I've had both happen. I now have the newer OEM design with bleeder in the pipe.

Spend the extra $20-30 at a discount dealer and get the OEM one with the bleeder seat welded to the metal pipe. The aftermarket (Dorman) parts are the inferior old design with the bleeder seat molded into the top), and typical questionable Dorman quality (fail within a few months), so chances are you'll be doing it all over again soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
I'm thinking to remove the housing and pipe as an assembly you'll have to raise the plenum about an inch or so to get at the back two bolts.

I'm interested in everyone's trick at getting the pipe out. After removing the heater hose at the back of the engine, (The one below the throttle body.) I usually take the m6 bolt out of the left head that holds the clip at the end of the tube and just remove the clip.

Then I remove the four nuts that hold the motor mounts to the frame and jack the engine up until the pipe will clear the core support. Usually, I've found that to be faster than taking out all those bolts for the upper core support.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,323 Posts
I'm thinking to remove the housing and pipe as an assembly you'll have to raise the plenum about an inch or so to get at the back two bolts...
That is definitely true - no way around it (I and others tried).

I'm interested in everyone's trick at getting the pipe out. After removing the heater hose at the back of the engine, (The one below the throttle body.) I usually take the m6 bolt out of the left head that holds the clip at the end of the tube and just remove the clip...
Yep - that's the only way. Kind of hard to see and reach that, and if one doesn't study it hard enough, they may never figure it out.

Then I remove the four nuts that hold the motor mounts to the frame and jack the engine up until the pipe will clear the core support. Usually, I've found that to be faster than taking out all those bolts for the upper core support.
Now that's a new one on me. I'll have to remember that. But I hope to never need to do it again - did it tiwce already. The new design OEM with bleeder welded to the pipe has been in two years now - so far so good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Just an excellent example of a bad design all around. It has two problems/failure modes: A metal insert (the bleeder seat) molded into plastic that sees pressure combined with thermal cycling, and that seam of the top cap - don't know if it's glued or solvent welded or what, but it also fails, as you showed. I've had both happen. I now have the newer OEM design with bleeder in the pipe.

Spend the extra $20-30 at a discount dealer and get the OEM one with the bleeder seat welded to the metal pipe. The aftermarket (Dorman) parts are the inferior old design with the bleeder seat molded into the top), and typical questionable Dorman quality (fail within a few months), so chances are you'll be doing it all over again soon.
What I was told, when that bit blew up on mine, was that the plastic is sonic welded together. Seems logical enough, since I actually popped the "top" off with a screwdriver and didn't see any glue or anything. JB Weld blew up on me after about a week.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top