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I have a 2001 Intrepid, 3.2. Last year I had the following replaced on the car:

Upper and lower radiator hoses
Radiator (filled with HOAT 50/50 coolant)
Thermostat (Mopar) - not installed backwards
Heater tube
Upper intake gasket
Serpentine belt
Both cam seals because of oil leak
Water pump not replaced because fairly new, however, the pump o-rings were replaced due to coolant leak
Switched the upper intake from my 3.2 Concorde because the one from the trep in better condition.

After work completed car overheats, but needle moves below halfway when turn on heater. Each time overheated, the system bled until no bubbles.

No loss of coolant and no milky color of inside of oil filler cap, therefore, head gasket likely not blown. Heater blows hot, so likely not caused by a bad heater core.

No air bubbles in coolant at the bleeder port, today. Coolant level in reservoir is consistent. Today, overheated after a 5 minute drive 40 F degrees outside. Upper radiator hose warm, and radiator cold too.

Any ideas as to cause of engine overheating?
I had the same problems and I had to get a new radiator and that fixed it. I'm not saying that you should go out and buy radiator but that's what fixed my car
 

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So, once again looking back at the OP...

"Radiator (filled with HOAT 50/50 coolant)," Does this mean only the coolant was replaced or the radiator too?
 

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Discussion Starter #43
So, once again looking back at the OP...

"Radiator (filled with HOAT 50/50 coolant)," Does this mean only the coolant was replaced or the radiator too?
As I wrote in the 1st post, new radiator was installed. The person I purchased the car from said he never flushed the cooling system. After I purchased it, I was refilling with Prestone when coolant low. New radiator was filled with HOAT 50/50 and some distilled water.
 

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Discussion Starter #44 (Edited)
When the upper intake was removed last year to replace the heater tube, the intake was off for a few weeks and I put tape over it to keep debris from getting inside the engine. However, some debris could have fell in. So, here is my plan:

1) Drain coolant.

2) Remove end of upper radiator hose where connects to engine and one end of lower radiator hose and run water from hose through it to verify no blockage in radiator (such as maybe a cap from factory not removed before radiator installed).

3) If blockage in radiator, remove all hoses to locate/remove any factory caps and reconnect hoses/refill coolant/bleed system.

4) If no blockage in radiator, remove the new mopar thermostat installed recently and test to see if stuck. Install remove thermostat and install modified thermostat in upper rad hose (procedure as one described in 300m forum with a hole in thermostat) cruzcar said he will give me, then refill/bleed system.

5) Flush system...any recommendations on procedure and brand flushing solution to use?

The check engine light is on. When I had it scanned a few months ago, obd showed vacuum leak and issue with O2 sensor, but I don't remember the code#'s. Can either a vacuum leak or problem with O2 sensor cause overheating?
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
Update:

I removed one end of upper and lower radiator hose and ran water through top hose and poured through bottom hose, so verified no blockage in radiator.

While draining the coolant, I noticed some debris in the pan. Not sure if from coolant flowing over the dirty beam just below the drain cock or if from inside the engine. Attached is pic of debris after putting a microfiber rag inside the funnel after pouring old coolant in a jug. If small debris like on the rag from inside the engine, could that cause over heating?

I removed the new thermostat but haven't checked it yet to see if stuck. I'm planning on installing the modified thermostat in the upper radiator hose next week but want to flush the system tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Overheating resolved!

Here's what I did:

Put car on ramps.

Removed drain plug with a long handled pair of pliers with 90 degree angle on end (from Harbor Freight) and drained coolant into pan.

Reinstalled drain plug.

Removed shroud that covers radiator.

Removed serpentine belt.

Removed alternator.

Removed thermostat housing and thermostat.

Replaced thermostat gasket and reinstalled thermostat housing to engine block (did not reinstall thermostat).

Ran water from hose through upper radiator hose to flush radiator through lower hose into pan.

Installed a 2" long clear tube purchased from Home Depot onto thermostat housing (did not install a clamp).

Moved drain pan from under lower hose to under clear tube.

Ran water from hose through reservoir to flush engine through end of clear tube.

Connected lower radiator hose to thermostat housing.

Reinstalled alternator and serpentine belt.

Removed upper radiator hose.

Installed modified thermostat into upper radiator hose and reinstalled it.

Filled reservoir with about of pint of HOAT coolant, one bottle of Liqui Molly flush, and distilled water.

Started car, turned on heater, let run for 30 minutes, and turned off car.

Let engine cool, removed radiator plug, and drained mixture into pan.

Ran water from hose through reservoir into pan until soapy residue from flush was clear.

Reinstalled drain plug.

Using special funnel recommended by Ronbo, filled reservoir with HOAT 50/50 and some distilled water.

Started car.

Opened bleeder valve, attached clear tube, and bled system into empty jug until no air bubbles, poured coolant from jug into reservoir. Topped of reservoir with coolant.

Closed bleeder valve.

Reinstalled shroud.

Started car for test drive...temp needle moved slightly above 3/8 while driving and halfway between 3/8th and 1/2 while idling.

There was some debris from coolant flush, but I think main reason this worked was because of modified thermostat in upper radiator hose.

Thanks cruzcar, peva, ronbo, and others for your help!
 

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Congratulations! Your persistence has paid off.

Strange that the new thermostat location works, as others have found out also. It makes one wonder what it is that has changed, since it's assumed that there was no overheating when the car was new, and others with similar age and mileage do not have overheating.
 

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Obviously it would be "best" to fix the problem, and this is a "bandaid" solution, but life (not having the time, money, or expertise) to fix the real problem) sometimes gets in the way of doing 'best'.

When battery power is removed, PCM and TCM will default to factory presets when power is reconnected. Then the computers adjust themselves/re-learn to your driving habits. Not sure if there is extra stress on transmission until the TCM adapts to the "cup volume indexes" (CVIs) for proper shift characteristics. It may be that the CVIs are non-volatile and actually don't have to re-learn every time battery power is lost. However, if your battery is presently draining down to levels that cause the computers to revert to factory presets between starts without this device installed, then you're no worse off in that regard with it installed. Its automatically disconnecting at 11.8 volts certainly will prevent or greatly reduce battery damage over time from its going thru deeper discharges without the device.

I'd suggest making a concerted effort to identify (by measuring vehicle-off discharge current thru the various fuses and circuits) and fix the reason for discharge before going this route, and I know you've already attempted that to some degree. Only you can make the decision if and when to go to this less than ideal work-around.

Is there enough room around the battery tor the device to fit?
 

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CVI values, I believe are non-volatile. As when an overhaul is performed, you are supposed to do a quick-learn procedure to get the CVI values back to the "Assembled" range.

Nothing was funnier than when a tech would forget to do this after an O/H. Transmission behavior was wild.
 

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CVI values, I believe are non-volatile. As when an overhaul is performed, you are supposed to do a quick-learn procedure to get the CVI values back to the "Assembled" range.

Nothing was funnier than when a tech would forget to do this after an O/H. Transmission behavior was wild.
Thanks for that information.
 
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