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Discussion Starter #1
I damaged the mating surface of the left side valve cover while trying to take it off. When i replaced the gasket the engine leaked oil badly. It seems like no new mopar valve covers are available. Anyone have any suggestions or have a good used one. Would permatex black sealant work to seal oil leak. The damage is on the lower part of cover. How much oil pressure is there under the valve cover?
 

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There is no oil pressure, per-se, against the valve cover - only a slight vacuum from the PCV system (at times, maybe a slight positive pressure). Most valve covers leak (with a compromised gasket) at the lower side just from pooled oil and gravity - not from oil or crankcase air pressure.

Would you say that there us a gouge or nick in the mating surface, but other than that, the entire mating surface is a perfectly straight line (no warpage/bowing)? If so, you could probably do fine by cleaning up any raised parts of the gouged area with a file (jeweler's file would be preferable) being very careful not to disturb any nearby (undamaged) mating surface, and then filling (over-filling) the gouge with J-B Weld, then, after it thoroughly cures, filing/sanding the excess J-B Weld down to be exactly flush and straight with the rest of the mating surface. I believe the gasket inserts in a groove in the bottom of the valve cover, so also clean up any gouging inside that groove by, again, filing any raised metal flush and filling in any gouge with the J-B Weld, then file/sand flush.

The idea is to re-create the original shape (maintaining overall straightness) of the mating surface and groove as closely as possible.

The gaskets for the valve covers are high-quality and very pliable silicone rubber and should seal against remaining minor surface imperfections, but it wouldn't hurt to add a thin layer of black RTV to the damaged/repaired area when re-assembling.

Of course, thoroughly rinse out the repaired valve cover with brake parts cleaner - you don't want to be introducing any metal and epoxy filings into the engine.

. . . or find a used valve cover. :)
 

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I must say Peva, you know a lot about filler. Did you work at a body shop? I also liked how you finished it too. (y)
Heh! No - I've not worked in a body shop. I'm a degreed and licensed engineer (biomechanical by degree, electronics by career experience).
 

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Heh! No - I've not worked in a body shop. I'm a degreed and licensed engineer (biomechanical by degree, electronics by career experience).
Wow biomechanical, good job congrats! You sure though. I don't feel like they teach you body work in biomechanics.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There is no oil pressure, per-se, against the valve cover - only a slight vacuum from the PCV system (at times, maybe a slight positive pressure). Most valve covers leak (with a compromised gasket) at the lower side just from pooled oil and gravity - not from oil or crankcase air pressure.

Would you say that there us a gouge or nick in the mating surface, but other than that, the entire mating surface is a perfectly straight line (no warpage/bowing)? If so, you could probably do fine by cleaning up any raised parts of the gouged area with a file (jeweler's file would be preferable) being very careful not to disturb any nearby (undamaged) mating surface, and then filling (over-filling) the gouge with J-B Weld, then, after it thoroughly cures, filing/sanding the excess J-B Weld down to be exactly flush and straight with the rest of the mating surface. I believe the gasket inserts in a groove in the bottom of the valve cover, so also clean up any gouging inside that groove by, again, filing any raised metal flush and filling in any gouge with the J-B Weld, then file/sand flush.

The idea is to re-create the original shape (maintaining overall straightness) of the mating surface and groove as closely as possible.

The gaskets for the valve covers are high-quality and very pliable silicone rubber and should seal against remaining minor surface imperfections, but it wouldn't hurt to add a thin layer of black RTV to the damaged/repaired area when re-assembling.

Of course, thoroughly rinse out the repaired valve cover with brake parts cleaner - you don't want to be introducing any metal and epoxy filings into the engine.

. . . or find a used valve cover. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I was replacing the original cover gasket with new felpro gasket because of a small oil leak.The original was as old as the car. But i had trouble removing the driver side cover due to wiring harness and other things in the way so i tried to pry the cover with a screw driver between the cover and head. Stupid idea but i thought the plastic cover would not indent like it did. There is plastic on each side of the groove and the inner part of the plastic that mates to the head is indented approximately 3/32 inch times about 1/4 inch long. When i assembled everything i had a massive oil leak in garage and lost about one quart of oil in a matter of minutes.wish i knew how to post a picture of cover. It could be a problem finding a good cover due to age of car. The cover was in perfect shape as i am the original owner of car. What type of JB weld should i use. The groove was slightly damaged also. I never had any luck with JB weld. What about the idea of just using permatex black silicone only. I have been working on cars for years and rarely make a mistake and this car is in unbelievable good condition...not ready for salvage yard yet. Its one of the best looking and maintained 2002 intrepids still on the road... which is not many due to the infamous 2.7 liter POS engine.
 

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You know - I forgot the valve cover is plastic - I was thinking aluminum. Depending on the type of plastic it is made of, it may be hard to find a good glue to stick to it.

Your idea of loading the damaged area up with RTV may work. I just don't know how leak proof it's going to be over the long term.

Here's something else you might try: Gorilla glue (https://www.lowes.com/pd/Gorilla-White-2-fl-oz-Polyurethane-White-Multipurpose-Adhesive/3098947)
It's like nothing else I've ever seen before. I've used it a few times. It expands 2 to 3 times while it cures, bonds like crazy, and is super tough. I don't use it a whole lot because usually when I'm gluing something (like a broken piece of china) I want the repair to be visibly undetectable. This ain't like that. It cures fairly quickly, and while it's curing, it's still expanding, and towards the last bit of curing, it is too hard to remove by wiping, but that last little bit of expanding leaves an ugly glue line.

But it is so sticky while it's curing and hard after it cures that I suspect that it will hold up to the heat and oil, and will bond to the plastic. No guarantees. Use a lot less than you think it needs because it does expand. Use it to fill the chewed up area, and then grind/file it to shape after it fully cures like you would the J-B Weld. The silicone rubber gasket is what is going to do the sealing - you just need to recreate the solid supporting shape around the gasket so the gasket can do its job.

IF you go this route, I suggest you experiment with it so you can see how much it expands, but also how sticky it is and how tough it is when cured. I think you will be surprised. (You could prove me totally wrong.) Moisture helps cure it - I think the instructions say to slightly dampen one of he surfaces it's going on (when gluing two things together).

I just suggest that as plan 'b' because my experience with RTV is that it doesn't prevent hot oil seepage for very long.

As far as the 2.7, I had a 3.2 and a 2.7, and my best experience by far was with the 2.7. Sold my Concorde with the 2.7 with about 295k miles on it last year still running like new, and that's no exageration. I actually scrapped the '98 3.2 engine after the timing belt broke prematurely, and moved the '99 2.7 engine from its damaged Concorde body to the Concorde body the 3.2 was in (and scrapped the 2.7's body).
 

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"I just suggest that as plan 'b' because my experience with RTV is that it doesn't prevent hot oil seepage for very long. "
Although Black RTV is all that is used to seal the tranny pan (and the bolts).
 

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"I just suggest that as plan 'b' because my experience with RTV is that it doesn't prevent hot oil seepage for very long. "
Although Black RTV is all that is used to seal the tranny pan (and the bolts).
The RTV used at the factory is a special type for transmission fluid. Perhaps the black RTV works better on motor oil than RTVs I tried several years ago. Black RTV is used on corners of the oil pans.
 
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