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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
94 LHS died while driving, need advice 3.5

OKay, i have a 94 LHS that has been running just fine and dandy for the last 3 years that I have had it. Or has it been 2? Whatever.

Anyway, I was dirving home from a buddy's house and going uphill (not a steep incline just a steady one). As i'm coming up the hill, the car just flat out dies. Nothing at all, the engine just quit. No big noises, just like someone turned the key off.

We managed to coast it to a safe place.

Now when I crank it, it doesn't fire. What happens is that whenyou first hit the key, it starts to spin then just binds for a few seconds then frees itself and then starts spinning away with no firing.

Any idea whats going on? Oh yeah, I'm getting no spark from the plugs when I pulled one boot and checked it when its firing.

Could this be a timing belt that broke?
 

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what engine?

check the easy stuff first. see if it stored any codes, check all the electrical connections, especially the engine ground cable.

AJ
 

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You got the LHS so it's the 3.5 L right ? I would take off the Cam Sensor, and then have someone crank her, at the same time look into the Cam Sensor hole to see if the Cam's are turning, if not then it's the belt. If the Cam's are turning then try this:

FAILURE-TO-START TEST

See Figure 1

This no-start test checks the camshaft position sensor and the crankshaft position sensor. Refer to the ignition coil tests before commencing with this test, much time may be saved if the problem lies within the coil.

The PCM supplies 8.0 volts to the camshaft position sensor and crankshaft position sensor through one circuit. If the 8.0 volt supply circuit shorts to ground, neither sensor will produce a signal (output voltage to the PCM).

When the ignition key is turned and left in the ON position, the PCM automatically energizes the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay. However, the PCM de-energizes the relay within one second because it has not received a crankshaft position sensor signal indicating engine rotation.

During cranking, the ASD relay will not energize until the PCM receives a crankshaft signal. Secondly, the ASD relay remains energized only if the PCM senses a camshaft position sensor signal immediately after detecting the crankshaft position sensor signal.

Check battery voltage with a voltmeter. Make sure to always attach the positive voltmeter wire to the positive (+) terminal of the component being checked. Do the same with the negative - wire also. Voltage for the battery should be approximately 12.66 volts or higher to perform the failure-to-start test.

Unplug the harness connector from the coil pack.

Connect a test light (or voltmeter) to the B+ (battery voltage) terminal of the coil electrical connector and ground. The wire for the B+ terminal is dark green with a orange tracer.


Fig. 1: Attach the 12 volt test light to the B+ (battery voltage) terminal of the coil electrical connector and ground



Turn the ignition key to the ON position. The test light should flash on and then off. DO NOT turn the key to the OFF position, leave it in the ON position.

If the test light flashes momentarily, the PCM grounded the ASD relay. Proceed to Step 5.

If the test light did not flash, the ASD relay did not energize. The cause is either the relay itself or one of the relay circuits. Test the circuits for a ground or open circuit, Refer to Chassis Electrical for further electrical information on circuits. Since Chrysler does not give a procedure for testing the relay with a voltmeter, ohmmeter or test light, have the component tested at a reputable automotive service center familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

Crank the engine. If the key was placed in the OFF position after Step 4, turn the ignition to the ON position before cranking the engine. Wait for the test light to flash once, then crank the engine.

If the test light momentarily flashes during cranking, the PCM is not receiving a camshaft position sensor signal. Test the camshaft position sensor circuits for a ground or open circuit, Refer to Chassis Electrical for further electrical information on circuits. Since Chrysler does not give a procedure for testing the camshaft position sensor with a voltmeter, ohmmeter or test light, have the component tested at a reputable automotive service center familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

If the test light did not flash during cranking, unplug the camshaft position sensor connector. Turn the ignition key to the OFF position. Turn the key to the ON position, wait for the test light to momentarily flash once, then crank the engine. If the test light momentarily flashes, the camshaft position sensor is shorted and must be replaced with a new one. If the light did not flash, the cause of the no-start is in either the crankshaft position sensor/camshaft position sensor 8.0 volt supply circuit, or the crankshaft position sensor 5 volt output or ground circuits. Have the crankshaft position sensor checked, after checking the sensor circuits for a ground or open circuit, by a reputable automotive service shop familiar with Chrysler vehicles

Coil Test
See Figures 2, 3 and 4


Fig. 2: The ignition coil connection terminal descriptions




Fig. 3: Check the primary resistance at the electrical connection and the secondary resistance across the coil towers




Fig. 4: Ignition coil terminal identification



Coil one fires cylinders 1 and 4, coil two fires cylinders 2 and 5, coil three fires cylinders 3 and 6 for the 3.3L and 3.5L engines. Each coil tower is labeled with the number of the corresponding cylinder.

Unplug the ignition cables from the coil terminals and the spark plugs. Make certain to label them before removal. Measure the resistance of the cables. Resistance must be between 3,000-12,000 ohms per ft. (30.5 cm) of cable. Replace any cable not within tolerance.

Unplug the electrical wiring harness connector from the coil pack.

Measure the primary resistance of each coil. At the coil, connect an ohmmeter between the B+ pin and the pin corresponding to the cylinders in question. Resistance on the primary side of each coil should be 0.45-0.65 ohms at 21-27°C (70-80°F). A coil not allowed to cool down, could result in inaccurate measurement results. Replace the coil with a new one if the resistance is not within tolerance.

Remove the ignition cables from the secondary towers of the coil. Measure the secondary resistance of the coil between the towers of each individual coil. Resistance for these engines depends on which manufacturer made the coil being tested. If the coil was manufactured by Diamond, the resistance should be 7000-15,800 ohms; if the coil was made by Toyodenso, the resistance should be 7000-15,800 ohms. If the coils' resistance are not within specifications, the coil must be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well duh! I forgot to do the cam sensor hole check.

I shall do that as soon as I can get to the car (at a buddy's house now).
 
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