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Discussion Starter #1
1997 Dodge Intrepid
3.5

I went in and had the radiator flused and the guy pluged in this thing under the steering wheel and he told me the computer needed to be looked at. I took it home and parked it and the next morning it would turn over but it would not start I changed the sparkplugs, coil pack,crank sensor and still nothing. My brother told me it was not getting any spark.
Could it be the computer (brain)?
If anyone can help please.
 

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Check the ASD Relay, and the Cam Sensor, since you already changed the Crank.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No, it was running just fine. I have had the car a little over 3 years now and never had one bit of a problem with it.
 

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The ASD Relay is located in the Relay Box in the Engine Bay by the Battery. On the inside of the cover you will see the loction picture of all the Relays. Here's how to test the Cam Sensor:

TESTING

See Figures 3, 4, 5 and 6


Fig. 3: Camshaft position sensor pin terminal ID-1993 3.3L engine




Fig. 4: Camshaft position sensor pin terminal ID-1994-95 3.3L engine




Fig. 5: Camshaft position sensor pin terminal ID-3.5L engine




Fig. 6: Camshaft position sensor pin terminal ID-1996-97 models



Before testing any electrical component, inspect the wiring and connectors for damage. Also wiggle the connectors to ensure a that they are firmly engaged. For this procedure a dwell meter, or the equivalent, will be needed.

Unplug the Camshaft Position Sensor (CPS) connector.

Turn the ignition ON.

Using a voltmeter, measure the voltage from the wiring harness connector 8-volt supply circuit (orange wire) to ground.

If the voltage is 8-9.5 volts, skip to the next step.

If the voltage measured is lower than 8 volts, or greater than 9.5 volts, the CPS is not receiving the correct current to function properly. There is a problem in the wiring or related components.

Turn the ignition OFF.

Attach the CPS wiring and engine wiring harness connectors back together.

Attach a dwell meter to the battery. Attach the lead probe of the dwell meter to the sensor signal wire (light blue wire with dark blue tracer) by backprobing the connector or by using jumper cables between the terminals. Refer to the accompanying wiring illustration.

Place the dwell meter out of the way of any moving components of the engine, and in a position in which it can be seen once the engine is started.

Turn the engine ON.

Watch the dwell meter for one or two minutes while the engine is idling. The dwell time shown should be a steady 49-51%. If there is any fluctuation, or the dwell time is not 49-51% the CPS is defective and must be replaced with a new one.

And this also may help you:

FAILURE-TO-START TEST

See Figure 1

This no-start test checks the camshaft position sensor and the crankshaft position sensor. Refer to the ignition coil tests before commencing with this test, much time may be saved if the problem lies within the coil.

The PCM supplies 8.0 volts to the camshaft position sensor and crankshaft position sensor through one circuit. If the 8.0 volt supply circuit shorts to ground, neither sensor will produce a signal (output voltage to the PCM).

When the ignition key is turned and left in the ON position, the PCM automatically energizes the Auto Shutdown (ASD) relay. However, the PCM de-energizes the relay within one second because it has not received a crankshaft position sensor signal indicating engine rotation.

During cranking, the ASD relay will not energize until the PCM receives a crankshaft signal. Secondly, the ASD relay remains energized only if the PCM senses a camshaft position sensor signal immediately after detecting the crankshaft position sensor signal.

Check battery voltage with a voltmeter. Make sure to always attach the positive voltmeter wire to the positive (+) terminal of the component being checked. Do the same with the negative - wire also. Voltage for the battery should be approximately 12.66 volts or higher to perform the failure-to-start test.

Unplug the harness connector from the coil pack.

Connect a test light (or voltmeter) to the B+ (battery voltage) terminal of the coil electrical connector and ground. The wire for the B+ terminal is dark green with a orange tracer.


Fig. 1: Attach the 12 volt test light to the B+ (battery voltage) terminal of the coil electrical connector and ground



Turn the ignition key to the ON position. The test light should flash on and then off. DO NOT turn the key to the OFF position, leave it in the ON position.

If the test light flashes momentarily, the PCM grounded the ASD relay. Proceed to Step 5.

If the test light did not flash, the ASD relay did not energize. The cause is either the relay itself or one of the relay circuits. Test the circuits for a ground or open circuit, Refer to Chassis Electrical for further electrical information on circuits. Since Chrysler does not give a procedure for testing the relay with a voltmeter, ohmmeter or test light, have the component tested at a reputable automotive service center familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

Crank the engine. If the key was placed in the OFF position after Step 4, turn the ignition to the ON position before cranking the engine. Wait for the test light to flash once, then crank the engine.

If the test light momentarily flashes during cranking, the PCM is not receiving a camshaft position sensor signal. Test the camshaft position sensor circuits for a ground or open circuit, Refer to Chassis Electrical for further electrical information on circuits. Since Chrysler does not give a procedure for testing the camshaft position sensor with a voltmeter, ohmmeter or test light, have the component tested at a reputable automotive service center familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

If the test light did not flash during cranking, unplug the camshaft position sensor connector. Turn the ignition key to the OFF position. Turn the key to the ON position, wait for the test light to momentarily flash once, then crank the engine. If the test light momentarily flashes, the camshaft position sensor is shorted and must be replaced with a new one. If the light did not flash, the cause of the no-start is in either the crankshaft position sensor/camshaft position sensor 8.0 volt supply circuit, or the crankshaft position sensor 5 volt output or ground circuits. Have the crankshaft position sensor checked, after checking the sensor circuits for a ground or open circuit, by a reputable automotive service shop familiar with Chrysler vehicles.

Well the two top things that are left on your car that whould stop you from starting your car, are the ASD Relay, and Cam Sensor.
 

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You should take it back to the shop that did the work and hold them liable.
 

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have it towed, hold them liable and they'll have to pay for the tow, and fix the car
 
J

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You checked the obvious, rite? The timing belt?

Behind the black cover, take off a few bolts and peek inside.
I mean, if they did something with cooling, piece of something foreign hit the water pump which siezed instantly and locked up the timing belt, which snapped.

Just dreamin' but I would check it. No spark can be no timing belt..
 
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