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I am with marif on this one, I need to know how to do it as well and the service manual is more than an arm reach away from the computer. :bigok:
 

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These are probably by far the easiest plugs you will ever change. Each coil is mounted with two bolts. Mine has regular hex head bolts (8mm?), while others have said they have torx head, so yours might be either. Do these one at a time and you should do them on a cold engine! Unplug the wires on the coil and remove the two screws. Give the coil a twist and gently pull it out. Make sure you use a spark plug socket with a rubber insert in it, the wells are pretty deep. Also use an extension that locks onto the socket (again the wells are pretty deep). Remove the plug, check the gap on the new plug, apply anti-seize to the threads of the new plug and install. I also put some anti-seize on the coil bolts when I put the coils back on. That's about it. The only one plug that you may encounter some issue with is the last one on the driver's side. There's some vacuum lines/fittings above it. Carefully unhook them or pull them out of the way and you'll be able to manuver the coil out of there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Froggy81500. Apologise my ignorance but what is "anti-seize" and where can I get it. I have changed SPs on older model GMs and Honda's and never used it.
 

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As the name implies, Anti-seize or some may call it never-seize is a paste applied to threads to keep them from getting stuck, or seizing. It can also be used on lug studs and brake caliper slides. It withstands heat and corrosion. One important thing to mention is that the heads on these cars are aluminun and the threads on the plugs are steel. These two metals are what is considered "dissimilar" (some chemistry for you) and they tend to get stuck together if you don't use anti-seize on the threads. And when you go to remove them later without previously using it, its more likely the head will strip before the plug will if they get stuck. Any auto parts store will have it.
 

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Can you please show some pics of this simple procedure?? I know sorry for the noob questions, but I need to get the most life out of my car at this time.

currently '99 2.7 142k on her and runs great!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Why in the world does DC make things so difficult, when it comes to maintainance. The freaking bolts on the sparkplug covers is an odd star shaped. I have a collection of about 30 some screw drivers, but nothing fits in.

Anyone know the trick to unclip the coil cable?? Duh - but will still ask, knowing how delicate DC makes things so they can rip us all off from parts sale.
 

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marif said:
Why in the world does DC make things so difficult, when it comes to maintainance. The freaking bolts on the sparkplug covers is an odd star shaped. I have a collection of about 30 some screw drivers, but nothing fits in.

Anyone know the trick to unclip the coil cable?? Duh - but will still ask, knowing how delicate DC makes things so they can rip us all off from parts sale.

Those are torx head bolts and they've been around for a long time. Its not just DC on this one. My '89 chevy had some torx head bolts, like for the headlights on that truck. YOu can try using an allen wrench CAREFULLY, but if it seems like its starting to round out the hole, stop and get the correct wrench.

As far as the coil wire, there's a tab near where the wire goes into the connector that you have to squeeze in order to get it off. Its a locking tab so they don't unexpectedly come off. They are a great idea but can be a PITA to get off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Replaced all six of them on the week-end. It was a breeze. The last one close to the steering wheel was a ***** - I had to disconnect a hoze, a connector, and the cable that goes to the fuse box. Once this was done, I was even able to do it with a regular socket wrench.
 
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