DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If an a/c compressor is to never have any form of liquid introduced through the low side suction port.

<ie. people who turn the refrigarant can upside down and slug the compressor.>

Then how does a person add oil to an existing system without doing the same thing?

Also I was adding R134A to my 97 Intrepid with a can that had oil mixed in it also. It was built like a fix a flat container and had the quick connector for the low side port built onto the cans hose. As i started slowly depressing the nozzle on the top of the can, the suction line started getting cold to the touch, suddenly the can blurped liquid down the clear hose and before i could disconnect it, the liquid went into the compressor. A few seconds later a hiss and spurge of gas came out from what looked like behind the clutch.

Did i wipe my compressor or blow a seal or something. I shut the car off and started it up a day later and pressed the scrader valve tip quickly and the system still has gas in it as i got a nice response like you would hear when checking your tires with a tire gauge.

Im wondering now if this $15 can of Quick Cool R134A just cost me hundreds to get the system fixed.

Any insigt or advice would be well appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
851 Posts
you should check your pressure before assuming your just low on refrigerant. there is like 2 oz of pag oil in those quick fix cans. the pag oil lubricates the compressor. no issues there, shouldnt hurt anything. i would say there is somethig else going on there causing your ac not to function as you would like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,037 Posts
Unless you are replacing a major componant, compressor, receiver drier, or condensor you shouldn't have to add any oil. Excess oil will saturate the metering device (h-block) and you will have poor or no cooling. Buy "straight" R134a without sealers, dye, or oil in it.

There is a seal behind the clutch. It's actually a piece of carbon that spins on a piece of ceramic. The carbon part spins against the ceramic and is spring loaded. There is also a large strange looking o-ring between the compressor and the manifold that sits on top of it. I have seen these o-rings "blow-by" when the safety valve dosen't open. The good thing is that they can reseal themselves after the high pressure is gone.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top