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Discussion Starter #1
Well after seeing MrBigE's thread I decided to go ahead and check the condition of my wp and tb and see how that stuff was going because I had to replace my A/C belt anyway and because my car was acting up a bit so I figured why not! Get everything pulled apart and when I pull off the timing belt cover I find about five or six three inch long string from the timing belt. Upon further inspection everything looks to be okay but I just wanna make sure.

The timing belt has a little over 2,000 miles on it and I don't know when the pump or tensioner was changed last because I got the motor 2,000 miles ago.

All help appreciated.
 

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I would check the sprockets and make sure that there isn't anything that might be catching the edge of the belt, especially on the crank sprocket. If its a real thin string then I think I'd just cut them off at the edge of the belt so that they couldn't catch on anything and destroy the belt, but if its thick strings then I'd probably choose to replace the belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They are pretty thin strings and I will check the sprockets out. I was just curious if the tensioner or any of that other stuff could have been the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Just ordered a water pump from rockauto just to be on the safe side.... tensioner appears to still be in good shape but I will replace as needed. Also found another string that weighs in at a foot long!
 

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Just ordered a water pump from rockauto just to be on the safe side.... tensioner appears to still be in good shape but I will replace as needed. Also found another string that weighs in at a foot long!
Honeslty, I wouldnt trust an aftermarket pump. An OEM pump isnt too much more and the quality is far superior. I remember reading about some issues with 3.x Gates pumps a few years back.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Okay so I am just over halfway through my whole little dance here and I just now (after installing the new pump) realized that I forgot to realign all the timing marks before taking off the old belt and removing the tensioner. So how do I go about fixing this?
 

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If you didn't move the crankshaft or camshafts during or after belt removal, put the belt and tensioner on with crank and cams just like they are now, then rotate it all to line the crank up to the timing position (if it gets harder to move than from normal friction and valve spring pressure, it means the crank and cams are way out of sync, and valves and pistons are touching each other - immediately STOP, and assess where you are). Then adjust the cams as needed (should only be one or two teeth) for proper timing mark lineup.

Did either cam move much when the t-belt was removed?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you didn't move the crankshaft or camshafts during or after belt removal, put the belt and tensioner on with crank and cams just like they are now, then rotate it all to line the crank up to the timing position (if it gets harder to move than from normal friction and valve spring pressure, it means the crank and cams are way out of sync, and valves and pistons are touching each other - immediately STOP, and assess where you are). Then adjust the cams as needed (should only be one or two teeth) for proper timing mark lineup.

Did either cam move much when the t-belt was removed?
I think the driver side cam and the crank barely moved but I feel the passenger cam moved a bunch because it is in the timing marks and the other two have a bit to go yet. I tried to get it set up again before they moved but the tensioner slipped and smashed my fingers and thats when it moved.
 

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Move one element (meaning one of the cams or the crank) at a time, feeling for brick-wall obstruction of valve-to-piston contact. Of course stop immediately (it takes a lot of force to actually do damage - simple contact is not enough), and try moving a different element as much as you can in the right direction. If the same thing happens again, then go to another element. You likely will need a helper to hold the cams in the furthest position you can get them to in the right direction (there's a hex shape on the front of each sprocket to grab onto with an open end or adjustable wrench) to keep them from rotating on their own from valve spring pressure.

Be aware that if you can park the crankshaft to approx. 60° before or after TDC (crank mark lined up is #1 TDC), the cams can be rotated all you want without any valve-piston contact - you may be able to use that fact at some point in the process. (For visual reference, if you were to mark those two 60° points, those and a BDC mark would be evenly spaced (at 120° intervals) around the full circle - not saying you need to mark the points, just said that to help visualize it - and, again, it doesn't have to be exactly at 60° to provide full clearance for all valves and pistons.)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Move one element (meaning one of the cams or the crank) at a time, feeling for brick-wall obstruction of valve-to-piston contact. Of course stop immediately (it takes a lot of force to actually do damage - simple contact is not enough), and try moving a different element as much as you can in the right direction. If the same thing happens again, then go to another element. You likely will need a helper to hold the cams in the furthest position you can get them to in the right direction (there's a hex shape on the front of each sprocket to grab onto with an open end or adjustable wrench) to keep them from rotating on their own from valve spring pressure.

Be aware that if you can park the crankshaft to approx. 60° before or after TDC (crank mark lined up is #1 TDC), the cams can be rotated all you want without any valve-piston contact - you may be able to use that fact at some point in the process. (For visual reference, if you were to mark those two 60° points, those and a BDC mark would be evenly spaced (at 120° intervals) around the full circle - not saying you need to mark the points, just said that to help visualize it - and, again, it doesn't have to be exactly at 60° to provide full clearance for all valves and pistons.)
I now see what you mean about them moving on their own.... lol. I will bring my friend over tomorrow to help hold the passenger cam in place while I loop on the new belt. Currently working on getting the pin compressed on the tensioner and I cant get mine to move at all. I tried a c clamp and a couple different vices (one was too small and I could only get the pin and one of the bolt connections) but even still I cant get it to compress.
 

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You'll have to use a vise to compress the tensioner and then use a nail to lock it place. Or you could SLOWLY work the tensioner up by the use of the bolts. Be EXTRA careful not to strip the threads from the aluminum block. I wrap the belt from the lower crank, over the drivers side and then to the passenger's side. I will rotate Clockwise the passenger cam about 1/2 tooth as the tensioner tightenes, it pulls the passenger cam. Extra set of hands will help.

As PEVA said above, stop immediately if you feel resistance when rotating the crank after the belt is on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Alright got the timing belt and everything all back together. Got the tensioner back in by coaxing it on with the bolts slowly and alternating between the two as I went. Also managed to get everything lined up pretty much dead on and it stayed that way after two rotations of the crank.

Tomorrow the front end will get put back together and during all this I managed to figure out what I think may be the cause of the weird noise coming from the front of the engine. I think its the idler pulley because when I spin it it will shake a bit and make a nice rattling sound similar to the one I have had since swapping motors.

Now surely my engine should run better but I may still have my P0300 problem to deal with after this in which case I will need to get my hands on some torx bits (that aren't stripped to hell) so that I can remove the coils and check the condition of the plugs and possible do a bit of a coil dance to see if they are indeed the problem.

Hopefully, I wont have any more problems after all this is done....
 
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