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Discussion Starter #1
I had my tires changed a about 6 weeks ago and apparently the dumbass that did the job decided to torque my lug nuts to the absolute max that he could. I have a bit of a vibration now so I wanted to take my wheels off and look at the suspension, but I find now that my lug nuts are tightened randomly between 140ft/lbs and 200ft/lb on my aluminum rims....what should I do?? should I just take them off with my strong arm and a lot of elbow grease and hope I don't break a stud in the process or would it be better to have then taken off with an impact wrench?
This is undoubtedly pretty bad, the vibration is probably because something has warped, this could easily ruin my rims and certainly the rotors right?
 

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This could definately ruin your rotors, no doubt. I probably would go ahead and use an impact wrench because in your case with them being tightened to hell and back, if you use a socket or what ever you were going to use, you will be pushing down upon the studs therefor you will be putting pressure on them in a way they weren't made for. So don't initially use your strongness lol. But if the impact wrench doesn't work, I guess your arms are the last resort, but if you do have to use pure strength, make sure you use a breaker bar. It will make it a lot easier.
 

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break the studs, they are easy to replace.
 

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Get a big ole breaker bar....that's what I used when I couldn't get my lugs off...and get a quality socket too. Works every time.
 

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Go back to the place that changed the tires. Tell the manager what you feel when braking, and that you would appreciate it they would check the torque on the lug bolts in your presence. If they are over-torqued (From the Dodge FSM:specs=100 ft. lbs.) explain to him that since the were not done to the correct specs they may have caused they rotors to warp/bend. Have them re-torque them to specs. If that doesn't correct the problem, ask them for some compensation. Pep Boys replaced my front rotors for free because they over-torqued them on a tire rotation. I reported the shimmy right away, I didn't wait 6 weeks.
 

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pgr1940 said:
Go back to the place that changed the tires. Tell the manager what you feel when braking, and that you would appreciate it they would check the torque on the lug bolts in your presence. If they are over-torqued (From the Dodge FSM:specs=100 ft. lbs.) explain to him that since the were not done to the correct specs they may have caused they rotors to warp/bend. Have them re-torque them to specs. If that doesn't correct the problem, ask them for some compensation.
:werdsign:

But you might be SOL because it's been a month and a half. That's a fair bit of time to wait if you had problems right away. Makes it hard to prove they screwed something up.

Also, remember that breaking torque is always higher than tighening torque.

100 lb/ft is the spec. I always watch the guys rotate or change my tires to see if a torque wrench is used to for final tightening, and talk to the service manager if they don't.

Cheers

BJ
 

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Perfect Example

:beer: People often ask me why I do my own car maintenance. An example like this illustrates why. Applying the proper torque in the correct sequence is important. The person doing the job at the car repair place may or may not have been properly trained. These places will not let you in to watch them do the work because they'll say their lawyers won't allow it.

The problem is that they won't be held accountable for doing harm to your car.

If I do the job myself I can take as much time as required to do it correctly. The proper materials and processes are within my own control. Plus, I get the satisfaction of seeing a job done well.
 

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vision67 said:
:beer: People often ask me why I do my own car maintenance. An example like this illustrates why. Applying the proper torque in the correct sequence is important. The person doing the job at the car repair place may or may not have been properly trained. These places will not let you in to watch them do the work because they'll say their lawyers won't allow it.

The problem is that they won't be held accountable for doing harm to your car.

If I do the job myself I can take as much time as required to do it correctly. The proper materials and processes are within my own control. Plus, I get the satisfaction of seeing a job done well.
I agree 100%. People just don't understand when it comes to cars. Cars are my life, I don't know what I would do without them lol. Some people... I'll tell you what.
 

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ARRRGGHH, I always have the same problem. Frickin retards and thier air wrenches.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Where it was 6 weeks before I thought to check the torque I imagine I am out of luck. Thing is, the place (small one man private garage) came highly recommended to me as the best tire/alignment place around amoung the local car guys, he's been in business over 20 years at the same spot so I am surprised he F'ed up so bad but I doubt I can convice him that its his fault after this much time.

By the way a "strong arm" is probably what we call a "breaker bar" in this part of the country, I wasn't talking about my muscles. LOL
 
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