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I'm mentally toying around with removing the INTREPID letters from the back of the car, painting them black, and then reattaching them. Since the car is Flame Red with black accents it just seems the silver lettering kinda clashes with the overall theme of the car.

Following most of the advice here it seems fairly straight forward enough to remove the lettering. That being said....

What kind of paint should I use?
Also what kind of techniques/drying time should I use to ensure it will be permanent in all weather conditions?
Are the letters plastic or metal?
Once I have removed the existing adhesive residue what kind of adhesive/glue should I use to reattach the lettering?

Thanks in advance.
 

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puzzleface said:
What kind of paint should I use?
Also what kind of techniques/drying time should I use to ensure it will be permanent in all weather conditions?
Are the letters plastic or metal?
Once I have removed the existing adhesive residue what kind of adhesive/glue should I use to reattach the lettering?

Thanks in advance.
1. Exterior grade spray pant. Try a local body shop supply store for universal black. It's not gloss or satin, but in between and looks very similar to trim black.
2. good prep and quality paint. Air dry as per the instructions on the can (couple days to a week to ensure complete drying before handling). One note, cold temps are very bad for painting, do it in a warm place, ensure you have good ventilation or you may pass out! Make sure you scuff the surface with sand paper (not too rough, 600 wet paper is good) so the paint has a surface to adhere too or it will flake and peel. Get the whole thing, contoured sides especially. The paint typically peels from the edges first.
3. plastic, with chrome plating
4. 3M trim tape. body shop supplies again.

It should look pretty good once you're done!

Cheers

BJ
 

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I've thought the same thing about chrome lettering on my silver car, being a bit too close, and considered satin black. Keep us posted on your progress.
 

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What I did with my badging after I removed it was take a small bottle of touch-up paint (body color in my case) and painted just the raised part of the letters with the the little brush. In your case, I would suggest a black paint rattle can. Scuff up the surface a bit, lay down plastic primer, wetsand the primer if you feel like it. Lay down a few coats of the black, and lay down some clear coat since your lettering will be exposed to the elements. Regular autozone rattle cans should do just find, as I did that with the grills on my car and it came out relatively ok (until the car got in a fight with pebbles falling off of a trailor on the highway... and lost).
 

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milkmann915 said:
i still got my lettering from debadging, im just trying to figure out where to use them, maybe on interior? idk.....

keeping with the topic, any special paint needed for painting interior nobs and ****, and fluid caps under the hood? spray paint or brush?
Use high temp paint under the hood. Use regular spray paint for interior pieces. There's an extensive process to making interior pieces look nice with spray paint though. There's a post on my cars forum that outlines the process for painting dashboards and center consoles perfectly, gimme a minute to find it.

Hmm, I can't seem to find the write-up, must be too old. For knobs you could probably get away with just spraying them, since they're small. Anything else will require wetsanding, primer, more wetsanding, more primer, light wetsanding, paint, clear coat (for glossy look). Talk to the Carlisle guys about knobs and window switches (kcarlos has a set I think, Bimmer_2002 as well).
 

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padredestino said:
Use high temp paint under the hood. Use regular spray paint for interior pieces.
Do not, REPEAT DO NOT, use regular spray paint on plastic. It may go on fine at first, or it may fish eye. If it does go on good at first, it will flake and peel eventually. That'll pi!$$ you off more than I can describe.You must use paint that is intended for plastics, or apply a special primer for plastics first. The lettering is fine without because you aren't applying the paint ot the plastic, you're putting it on the chrome plating.
Under hood? Depends on the application. For plastic, plastic paint. If it's made out of plastic, the thing will melt long before the paint is damaged (assuming it's thermoplastic and not thermosetting plastic). If you're painting mainfolds and such, use the high temp paint.
The prep is more important than the actual spraying. Scuff the surfaces thoughly and make sure they are degreased properly for a nice finish that will last. Also, try to find paint that can tollerate oil and grease. Most rattle can paints can, but they usually fall short because the paint layer is relatively thin and prone to damage. Use multiple coats to build it up (keep in ming, we're talking about a mm or so at most here).

Cheers

BJ
 

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Great White said:
padredestino said:
Use high temp paint under the hood. Use regular spray paint for interior pieces.
Do not, REPEAT DO NOT, use regular spray paint on plastic. It may go on fine at first, or it may fish eye. If it does go on good at first, it will flake and peel eventually. That'll pi!$$ you off more than I can describe.You must use paint that is intended for plastics, or apply a special primer for plastics first. The lettering is fine without because you aren't applying the paint ot the plastic, you're putting it on the chrome plating.
Under hood? Depends on the application. For plastic, plastic paint. If it's made out of plastic, the thing will melt long before the paint is damaged (assuming it's thermoplastic and not thermosetting plastic). If you're painting mainfolds and such, use the high temp paint.
The prep is more important than the actual spraying. Scuff the surfaces thoughly and make sure they are degreased properly for a nice finish that will last. Also, try to find paint that can tollerate oil and grease. Most rattle can paints can, but they usually fall short because the paint layer is relatively thin and prone to damage. Use multiple coats to build it up (keep in ming, we're talking about a mm or so at most here).

Cheers

BJ

That's what I did, I used a plastic primer on my dashboard, center console, and grills before painting (after thorough cleaning and degreasing, of course).

Of course, if you've ever used a cleaning agent and protectant on interior pieces (dash, switch bezel, knobs, etc.) then you should degrease before prepping.
 

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That's fine.
In your first post you didn't tell the guy to use the proper primer and in you second post you did, just as i pointed out in my post to yours.
It's all cool, we're both saying the same thing. It's just taking the long route to get there!

cheers

BJ
 

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lol sometimes I don't realize what I'm typing and leave important details out, so it's good that you caught that.
 
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