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Discussion Starter #1
It was nice and quiet for about a week, then it came back! Now its whining worse. Looks like it's the pump telling me it's ready to be replaced. Advance has a Cardone remain pump for $65.94 - 50.00 core. Autozono has an Atsco one for 65.99 - 22.00 core.

Any pointer for replacing the dammned thing?
 

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Dain bramaged
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if the pump had been making noise for a long time, or had bad fluid in it for a while, it prolly ate the seals up..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Veeb0rg said:
if the pump had been making noise for a long time, or had bad fluid in it for a while, it prolly ate the seals up..

The fluid in it was black. I'm probabily going to go to advance tomorow and pick up a new pump. Dosn't look too hard to change.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hopefully they sell them at the parts shop.

I plan on doing this tomorow, if its not too hot out.

Oh well, this should end the power steering issues for now, until I have to replace the rack down the road.
 

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Matt86 maybe this How-To will help you some:

Power Steering Pump

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4


Fig. 1: Power steering pump drive belt-3.5L engine




Fig. 2: Power steering hose routing clip




Fig. 3: Remove the clamp for the fluid supply hose at the pump




Fig. 4: Access the pump mounting bolts through the holes in the pump drive pulley



All LH platform vehicles with all available engine options use the Saginaw T/C style power steering pump with a remote mounted reservoir for the power steering fluid. The fluid reservoir is mounted to the left frame rail of the vehicle just rearward on the battery tray. No repair procedures are to be done on the internal components of the Saginaw power steering pumps. Repair of power steering fluid leaks from areas of the power steering pump sealed by O-rings is allowed. However, power steering pump shaft seal leakage will require replacement of the power steering pump.

Use only Mopar Power Steering Fluid or equivalent. DO NOT USE ANY TYPE OF AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION FLUID. Fluid level should be checked with the engine OFF to prevent injury from moving parts. Do not overfill. The dipstick should indicate FULL COLD when fluid is at outside air temperature of 70° to 80°F. Use care to make sure all power steering fluid hoses are returned to their original locations and positions. Clearance for most of these components is very close. Observe the way the hoses are positioned before removal to avoid chaffing damage later.

Disconnect negative battery cable and isolate from the battery.

Loosen the power steering drive belt by loosening the generator mounting pivot bolts and turning the adjuster bolt or loosen the power steering drive belt by loosening the adjuster pulley locking nut and then loosening the adjuster bolt. Remove the drive belt from the pump pulley.

Raise and safely support the vehicle.

Position an oil drain pan under the vehicle to catch leaking power steering fluid. Remove the hose clamps from the power steering fluid inlet hose at the pump. Remove the hose at the pump.

Loosen and remove the power steering pressure hose from the power steering pump discharge fitting.

Loosen and remove the 3 bolts attaching the pump to the power steering pump mounting bracket. Access to the pump mounting bolts is through the holes in the pump pulley.

Remove the power steering pump and drive pulley as an assembly out the bottom of the engine compartment.

Remove the power steering pump pulley as follows:

Mount the pump in a vise using the mounting bosses.

Remove the power steering pump pulley from the shaft using special puller tool C-4333, or equivalent.

Do not press or hammer on the shaft of the pump. This will cause internal pump damage.

Transfer parts to replacement pump, as required.

To install:

Install the power steering pump pulley as follows:

Place the pulley onto the shaft and make sure it is installed squarely.

Install the spacer provided with the replacement pump into the hub of the pulley.

Insert the pulley installer tool C-4063 (without adapters) through the hole in the spacer. Thread the tool into the pump shaft and tighten the tool into the shaft.

Hold the installer with one wrench so it does not rotate. Turn the hex down threaded rod of installer to push the pulley onto the shaft. Make sure the pulley does not become cocked during installation.

Continue to push the pulley onto the shaft until the tool will not turn.

Remove the installer tool and spacer. Turn the pulley and make sure it does not wobble. If it does, remove the pulley and check for a bent pump shaft, bent pulley or other malfunction.

Install the power steering pump back into the vehicle from below the engine compartment. Install mounting bolts and tighten to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm).

Correct orientation of the power steering pressure hose at the power steering pump must be maintained. Be sure the power steering hose is installed in the routing clip at the alternator (if equipped) prior to tightening tube fitting.

Attach the power steering pressure hose on the outlet port of the pump and tighten fitting to 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm).

Install the hose from the remote fluid reservoir to the low pressure port on the power steering pump.

Install the accessory drive belt over the power steering pulley. Lower the vehicle.

Adjust the belt tension and connect the negative battery cable.

Refill the pump reservoir to the correct level with Mopar Power Steering Fluid, or equivalent. Do not use any type of automatic transmission fluid. Start the engine and turn the steering wheel several times from stop to stop to bleed the air from the fluid in the system. Check and adjust fluid level as required.

Test drive vehicle to verify repair.



BLEEDING THE SYSTEM

Check the fluid level in the reservoir and fill to the correct level with the approved power steering fluid.

Start the engine and allow it to idle with the transaxle in Park.

Slowly turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and then all the way to the right. Turn it from lock to lock several times. Then, refill the fluid reservoir.



You should be able to get a pully puller from the parts store.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the how-to. I think I have a harmonic balancer puller somewhere, but I'll probabily end up getting a new puller. This looks easy to change, compared to my other cars. The acclaim has it shoved in the back against the firewall and engine, the Sable's is burried in a mess of ford junk!
 

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Dain bramaged
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acutally that how-to makes it more complicated then needed.. course we have 3.3l's not the 3.5 that how-to is for.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Replaced the pump today. On a scale of being a total ***** to a breeze, it was a little bitchy. I had to remove the radiator fan assembly. Also, its much easier to remove the pressure hose when the pump is unbolted so you can get at it with a wrench. The new pump came with extra o-rings for the high pressure hose too. I put it all back in, beld the air out and the pump is pretty much silent. Now you can hear the pushrods! Before all you'd hear is whining. I rented a power steering pulley puller from Advance. Worked great.

Total cost:

Remain Power steering pump - $65.94 minus core
1 qt of power steering fluid - $3.69

total hours:
1:45
 

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Are you talking about the whine when the wheels are turned all the way to either side? My Concorde has done that since I bought it almost 3 1/2 years ago. The only problem I've had is under fast turning conditions sometimes the power steering pump can't keep up. You'll have to let me know on this, as I may attempt to replace mine in the near future.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
this was a whine when the wheels were straight. It was soo loud, it was even louder than my Sable! and Sables/taurus's have the loudest power steering pumps known to man. Going down the road with the old pump, you could hear the whine over the engine noise. Now, when the wheels are straight its quiet, driving its quiet (now I can hear my brakes squeeking as I move :( ) and I can only hear it when I turn the wheels all the way to when the wheel locks. I can finally hear those sexy pushrods instead of that terrible whining.
 
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