DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums - Dodge Intrepid, Concorde, 300m and Eagle Vision chat banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,684 Posts
What is your oppinion on the best tire to put on your Intrepid or Concorde? What's your favorite wheels?
the tires i have on now are not too bad. Goodyear eagle. I have a problem with them wearing on the front but i think its got problems. Im probably gonna put michelin hydroedge on next, theyve had good reviews
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I've got Michelin Hydroedge on atm;
Decent in snow, pretty good in rain. There was a pretty big storm last week and had no problems getting to my destination. Kept good traction despite the downpour and puddles. As long as you rotate them when needed, they'll last a good while. I plan on switching though, run summer tires for my newly acquired Charger wheels, and switch from all season to winter tires for my chrome crusaders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
I have BFGoodrich Traction TAs on my Concorde and I think they are great. Noticed a huge improvement when I upgraded from some cheapies to these. They are really good for snow and all around. They made the car handle much better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
for winter i got nokian hakapelita5 and they are AMAZING and last 50000miles easy !!!

for summer i got michelin hydroedge and are f**** AMAZING and last 60000miles easy <---

im doing at least 50000miles a year for work ... and 10000miles for my family

and im driving a 1999 jetta 1.9l tdi 5speed and im having ~700,000km on it and still running smooth
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,960 Posts
I'm running 225/55/17 Cooper CS4's on my LHS at the recommendation of a lot of people here. They handle VERY well, are quiet, and are more of a luxury comfort ride tire than a sport tire.

On the Intrepid, 255/35/20 BF Goodrich KDW's.......f'in amazing, but they ride rough and are noisy :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,701 Posts
I attempted last year to save a few bucks and bought a used set of Summimotos-I know why the previous owner changed them LOL!!

Previously I swore by Toyo Proxies TPT but they have been replaced by Extensa's which are out of my current price range for a car with 700,000+ miles.

Ended up with Milestar MS932 (Nanking) which after about 7,000 miles I am pretty happy.
225/55/17 V rating with 101 load range. All season tire, heavily siped for rain/prevent hydroplaning M&S rated also. Quiet riding, been into 2-3 inch rain fall and feel pretty tight. Kind of surprised I like them.

http://www.milestartire.com/MS932.html

http://www.milestartire.com/MS932.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
My intrepid had Kelly Navigator Touring Gold tires when i bought it.for a cheap tire they wear incredibly well,hold the road great and do fine on snow and wet roads.i am pushing near 60,000 miles on these things.almost a year of 100 miles a day for work.now weatherchecking,sidewalls cracking near rims,its time to put them to rest.will be replacing with same tires.
Frank.
 

·
1st Gen FTW - It's AutoMedic!
Joined
·
15,449 Posts
Running who knows what on the front, but Firestone FR380 in the rear... Time to replace the fronts now, and I don't know if I want to buy more FR380s, or if I want to buy four new shoes all the way around and go with some upgrade... I think my local options will dictate what I do...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
i've spent countless hours on tirerack searching for a good tire that won't break the bank, best thing i've found is the Yokohama Avid TRZ. between surveys and tirerack's testing they have the best performance and mileage for the money.

*wet traction is a huge deal for me, nothing sucks worse than sliding around in the rain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
I agree that buying tires is always a tough call. You mention the Avid TRZ. Is there any reason you passed over the Hankook H727? Maybe they don't come in the right size for the Intrepid. From this ranking, the H727s are #1, and the TRZs are #4.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/surveyresults/surveydisplay.jsp?type=ST

I just picked up a set of these from Discount Tire for my 300M, and there is a $50 rebate through the end of November. Here's the link:

http://www.discounttiredirect.com/direct/findTireDetail.do?yr=2004&pc=12530&counter=1&ar=55&rd=17&vid=008425&sw=false&cs=225

At the time I bought them, the price was $118. It's gone up in the last few weeks!?!

The other one to consider is the #5 tire - Kumho KR21. I have had two of these on the Intrepid for quite a while, and I liked them so much, I picked up two more. They seem to be wearing very well! I would have bought them for the 300M, but they don't come in the 17" size.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
I agree that buying tires is always a tough call. You mention the Avid TRZ. Is there any reason you passed over the Hankook H727? Maybe they don't come in the right size for the Intrepid. From this ranking, the H727s are #1, and the TRZs are #4.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/surveyresults/surveydisplay.jsp?type=ST

I just picked up a set of these from Discount Tire for my 300M, and there is a $50 rebate through the end of November. Here's the link:

http://www.discounttiredirect.com/direct/findTireDetail.do?yr=2004&pc=12530&counter=1&ar=55&rd=17&vid=008425&sw=false&cs=225

At the time I bought them, the price was $118. It's gone up in the last few weeks!?!

The other one to consider is the #5 tire - Kumho KR21. I have had two of these on the Intrepid for quite a while, and I liked them so much, I picked up two more. They seem to be wearing very well! I would have bought them for the 300M, but they don't come in the 17" size.

Good luck!
i currently have traction t/a's on the 17's and before that i had kr21's on 16's. loved the traction out of the kuhmo's but they barely lasted 33k miles, not impressed.

i looked hard at the h727's but from tireracks testing they indicated they were less than desirable in the wet, like i said im a stickler for wet traction. their testing is really the only reason im deciding to go with the yoko's instead. between the survey and testing they seem to be the right choice for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Tire Tips

i've spent countless hours on tirerack searching for a good tire that won't break the bank, best thing i've found is the Yokohama Avid TRZ. between surveys and tirerack's testing they have the best performance and mileage for the money.

*wet traction is a huge deal for me, nothing sucks worse than sliding around in the rain.
I can also agree on the Avid TRZ as a very good compromise between price and quality for normal driving. They were tested a while back by Consumer Reports, and their only down side was poor braking performance on ice if that is a concern for you. This is much different than snow traction, which was rated good. There is also a performance version of the Avid.

You might also look at the Cooper Tires. They had a touring tire that was my second choice (can't remember the model). They are also usually a good value, and I think they are the only major line still made in the USA.

A Hankook brand tire (Mileage Plus II H725 - may be a different similar model now) was also rated high by Consumer Reports (and may cost a little less), but a problem is that there seem to be far fewer shops that can give warranty service on Hankook tires. These tires also had poor ice braking as the only downside.

A few other considerations:

1. I recommend using an independent tire shop and ordering through them rather than ordering on-line and getting someone to mount and balance. I found a shop who's prices where only a little higher than getting them on-line. You can ask for recommendations for tire shops at good parts stores like Carquest and NAPA or ask your mechanic. Check the shop's Better Business Bureau rating at your state's on-line BBB site. You can also look at the recommended installers list at Tirerack and the other on-line dealers, since those shops obviously know what the on-line prices are and may be most competitive.

The big advantage to ordering through the shop rather than on-line is that not only are you supporting a local business more, but you will be getting the warranty card through them. If you have any problems, they are going to be much more enthusiastic about helping you if you bought through them. If you have any vibration problems it could be a bad tire (needing warranty replacement), a bad wheel, or the mount/balance job. It is also a good idea to go to a shop that also does alignment and suspension work. You can have an alignment done at the same time and have your suspension checked.

2. I don't like the tire chain stores. In my area most of them have much less-experienced mechanics. Most people on this site probably know to to stay away from Wal-Mart for tires. I went to them a long time ago when I didn't know any better. First they somehow left the cut-off base of an old valve stem inside the new tire and it was rattling around in there - very weird. Second, I found out that many of the supposedly brand-name tires they carry are not the manufacturers' regular line tires; they are specially made for Wal-Mart. So you can only get warranty service through Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart doesn't tell you this unless you ask. Some of the managers don't even know. Also, you can't get a copy of the warranty from the manufacturer, you only get what Wal-Mart will give you. Uniroyal told me this in writing. The brands that do this with Wal-Mart include big names like Goodyear, Uniroyal, General Tire, Bridgestone, and Michelin. I don't buy these tire brands because I think this is a deceptive practice. Beware that other big department stores that have tire service centers may do the same thing as Wal-Mart.

3. Make sure to ask the shop to fill out the warranty card with your contact information. I prefer to mail it myself to make sure it gets sent. This is also necessary for any recalls. Be sure to hold on to your receipt. It is good to make a photocopy for your records and keep the original in the glove compartment in case you are traveling and need to get warranty repairs/replacement at another shop that handles the tire brand. Ask for a copy of the warranty. It may be available on-line for download or by writing/e-mailing the company, so the shop may not have a hard copies like most used to.

4. If you are going to bring in bare rims, make sure they are in good shape and wash them off. If you are mounting tires on bare steel rims, remove any surface rust from the sealing area with rust remover, a stiff brush and sandpaper, and then finish as smooth as you can with wet or dry automotive sandpaper. This is necessary because rust around the sealing area at the rim can causes a slow leak. If the rust is thick, after you remove it and sand, there may be visible pits or gouges where the tire seals. If so, you won't get good sealing, and your tires will leak. Time for a new rim in this case. After rust removal and sanding, repaint the bare areas with one of the specialty wheel paints for steel (Dupli-Color, Plasti-Kote, VHT and others.) This paint supposedly resists degradation by brake dust, cleaners, etc. Most of the auto parts stores have this paint.

If you are bringing in the car, and there is any rust on the sealing area of the steel rims, ask the shop if they can remove the rust and repaint the wheels - at least where the rust was removed. If they can't paint or you want to do this yourself, you could obviously put on a full-size spare tire and have the shop demount/replace the tires one at a time over a few weeks, while you clean and paint each bare individual rim.
 

·
1st Gen FTW - It's AutoMedic!
Joined
·
15,449 Posts
A few other considerations:

1. I recommend using an independent tire shop and ordering through them rather than ordering on-line and getting someone to mount and balance. I found a shop who's prices where only a little higher than getting them on-line. You can ask for recommendations for tire shops at good parts stores like Carquest and NAPA or ask your mechanic. Check the shop's Better Business Bureau rating at your state's on-line BBB site. You can also look at the recommended installers list at Tirerack and the other on-line dealers, since those shops obviously know what the on-line prices are and may be most competitive.

The big advantage to ordering through the shop rather than on-line is that not only are you supporting a local business more, but you will be getting the warranty card through them. If you have any problems, they are going to be much more enthusiastic about helping you if you bought through them. If you have any vibration problems it could be a bad tire (needing warranty replacement), a bad wheel, or the mount/balance job. It is also a good idea to go to a shop that also does alignment and suspension work. You can have an alignment done at the same time and have your suspension checked.
I have never seen an independent tire shop... I've seen independent garages (still attached to a major label like Cenex, Tesoro, etc), and some of them sell tires, but they don't stock much. All other tire shops I've seen are like a GoodYear dealer that is part of a chain. Then there is Sears, Walmart, K-mart, etc...

Which type of shop are you referring to when you say "Independent"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Tire Shops

I have never seen an independent tire shop... I've seen independent garages (still attached to a major label like Cenex, Tesoro, etc), and some of them sell tires, but they don't stock much. All other tire shops I've seen are like a GoodYear dealer that is part of a chain. Then there is Sears, Walmart, K-mart, etc...

Which type of shop are you referring to when you say "Independent"?
Every city I've ever lived in over about 50K people in the midwest USA has had independent tire shops with names like "Smith Tire and Auto," "Jones Tire and Alignment," or "Bob's Tire and Wheel" (listed in the yellow pages under "Tire Dealers"). Most of them also do alignments, and some do other suspension work.

When I say "independent" I mean any small or regional auto repair business. Most are part of one of the auto business associations like ASA, Tech-Net, etc., and they buy auto parts wholesale from Carquest, NAPA, etc. Independent tire & alignment shops also have accounts with regional wholesale tire distributors and can usually order any size or model tire you want from brands like Yokohama, Toyo, Michelin, Goodrich, Bridgestone, and Cooper within a week. Some regular auto repair shops can also order and install tires, though they may only be able to get a few brands wholesale.

The national chains such as Walmart, Sears, Big-O Tires, etc. probably buy directly from manufacturers. That is why they have their own in-store brands as well as the weird deal that Wal-Mart does with the "Wal-Mart only" brand name tires from companies like Goodyear and Uniroyal.

Perhaps there are some areas of the USA where independent tire shops are extinct for some reason, like so many small hardware stores and lumber yards got killed by Home Depot and Lowe's.
 

·
get off my lawn
Joined
·
15,505 Posts
Running who knows what on the front, but Firestone FR380 in the rear... Time to replace the fronts now, and I don't know if I want to buy more FR380s, or if I want to buy four new shoes all the way around and go with some upgrade... I think my local options will dictate what I do...
the FR380, has been Discountiued,, step up to the FR710,, wish they still made the FR440,, thats all I would run on my old Trep,
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top