DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all. I've been trying to bleed the brakes on my Trep. I have absolutely no brakes whatsoever, so here's what I'm facing. Two are bleeding great and two I'm not. The front Pass- bled at first but then it stopped. Now I've been told different ways to do this. Do I have the car running and just have someone pump and keep watching it? Or do I leave the car off? Or do ya'll think it's clogged or something wrong with the caliper? (Sorry about all the questions but I'm getting frustrated)

Ok, the other problem I'm having is the rear driver's side. The bleeder screw won't brake free. Anybody have any tips on getting it free without stripping it? It's already been stripped by somebody in the past. Any suggestions or tips will be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,341 Posts
Have you tried using a ratchet on the bleeder instead of a wrench? Bang a smaller size(metric or standard) whichever fits tightest and replace when you get it out. Try vise grips. If you have alot of miles on the car you might want to just change the caliper. Start bleeding at the passenger rear then drivers rear,passenger front, then drivers front. Kepp fluid in the master cylinder and pump the brakes slowly. Car can be off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,041 Posts
Umm, never had the problem of the bleeder being stuck, but here's a how-to on bleeding the brakes, from the book:

Bleeding The Brake System

CALIPERS AND WHEEL CYLINDERS

If using a pressure bleeder, follow the instructions furnished with the unit and choose the correct adaptor for the application. Do not substitute an adapter that almost fits as it will not work and could be dangerous. If a pressure bleeder is not available, a good brake fluid flow can be obtained by manually bleeding the brake hydraulic system outlined in this procedure.

Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Check the level often during the procedure.

Remove the protective caps from all four bleeder screws. Save for reuse. Clean the bleeder screws.

Connect a clear, tight fitting hose to the bleeder screw at the right rear wheel and place the hose into a clear container containing fresh brake fluid.

Pump the brake pedal three or four times and hold down before opening the bleeder screw.

Open the bleeder screw at least one full turn. With the bleeder screw open, the brake pedal will drop all the way down to the floor.

If the pedal is pumped rapidly, the fluid will churn and create small air bubbles, which are difficult to remove from the system. These air bubbles will eventually congregate and a spongy pedal will result.

Hold down the brake pedal and release only after the bleeder screw has been closed.

Repeat this procedure on the remaining brake bleeder screws. The brake system is bled in the following sequence:

Right rear

Left rear

Right front

Left front

Be sure that all trapped air has been expelled from the hydraulic system and that there is a short stroke and solid brake pedal feel. Check the brake fluid reservoir and keep filled to the proper level to ensure that no air re-enters the system through the master cylinder.

Hydraulic brake systems must be totally flushed if the fluid becomes contaminated with water, dirt or other corrosive chemicals. To flush, bleed the entire system until all fluid has been replaced with new fluid.

Install the bleeder cap(s) on the bleeder screws to keep dirt out. Always road test the vehicle, after brake work of any kind is performed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
mass04 said:
Have you tried using a ratchet on the bleeder instead of a wrench? Bang a smaller size(metric or standard) whichever fits tightest and replace when you get it out. Try vise grips. If you have alot of miles on the car you might want to just change the caliper. Start bleeding at the passenger rear then drivers rear,passenger front, then drivers front. Kepp fluid in the master cylinder and pump the brakes slowly. Car can be off.
I don't have much when it comes to tools. I pretty much have to borrow everything. But yet, Father's Day is coming up. But I was thinking of just replacing the calipers. The regular steps I'm familiar with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Strongt said:
Umm, never had the problem of the bleeder being stuck, but here's a how-to on bleeding the brakes, from the book:

Bleeding The Brake System

CALIPERS AND WHEEL CYLINDERS

If using a pressure bleeder, follow the instructions furnished with the unit and choose the correct adaptor for the application. Do not substitute an adapter that almost fits as it will not work and could be dangerous. If a pressure bleeder is not available, a good brake fluid flow can be obtained by manually bleeding the brake hydraulic system outlined in this procedure.

Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Check the level often during the procedure.

Remove the protective caps from all four bleeder screws. Save for reuse. Clean the bleeder screws.

Connect a clear, tight fitting hose to the bleeder screw at the right rear wheel and place the hose into a clear container containing fresh brake fluid.

Pump the brake pedal three or four times and hold down before opening the bleeder screw.

Open the bleeder screw at least one full turn. With the bleeder screw open, the brake pedal will drop all the way down to the floor.

If the pedal is pumped rapidly, the fluid will churn and create small air bubbles, which are difficult to remove from the system. These air bubbles will eventually congregate and a spongy pedal will result.

Hold down the brake pedal and release only after the bleeder screw has been closed.

Repeat this procedure on the remaining brake bleeder screws. The brake system is bled in the following sequence:

Right rear

Left rear

Right front

Left front

Be sure that all trapped air has been expelled from the hydraulic system and that there is a short stroke and solid brake pedal feel. Check the brake fluid reservoir and keep filled to the proper level to ensure that no air re-enters the system through the master cylinder.

Hydraulic brake systems must be totally flushed if the fluid becomes contaminated with water, dirt or other corrosive chemicals. To flush, bleed the entire system until all fluid has been replaced with new fluid.

Install the bleeder cap(s) on the bleeder screws to keep dirt out. Always road test the vehicle, after brake work of any kind is performed.
I will gladly use these tips when I do it this week. Thanks for the replies guys.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top