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I used to post photos all the time of the W clips correctly installed, but I lost the photos, and the photo-hosting site I had them parked on and that I linked to in my posts also lost the uploaded copies. It's a little tricky getting them positioned correctly, but photos help. You probably know this, but the clips only go on the front brakes, two per wheel.
 

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You're in luck. I looked back in some of my photo archives and found two photos (see below) showing how the clips go on the knuckles. These aren't the photos I used to post, but they show exactly what you need to know.

Notice that the pad ears slide in and out on the clips when the brakes are applied and released. Thats one reason to use the clips - they prevent the pad ears from wearing dips into the sliding surface of the knuckle. That wear surface gets renewed each time you replace the clips and pads.

It's a juggling act with the hands and fingers to get the caliper, pads, and clips in place on both ends of the caliper, but once they're there, and you get the caliper bolts started in their threads, everything stays in place. Not a bad idea to apply a little silicone brake grease on the sliding surface of the pad ears just before assembling - just don't get grease on the pads or rotor while you're juggling everything. 馃榾

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Peva bees Tha Man on brake "W" clips!
 

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I have had these W clips for the longest time, I recently changed the front brakes i didn鈥檛 Install them back. And for some reason, my braking power improved馃し馃徎鈥嶁檪锔
 

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I have had these W clips for the longest time, I recently changed the front brakes i didn鈥檛 Install them back. And for some reason, my braking power improved馃し馃徎鈥嶁檪锔
What brand and type pads did you have on it, and what's on their now? That can make a big difference.

Here is what the "Dubya" clips affect:
(1) They put a small amount of outward spring pressure on the pads - not enough to overcome friction of the caliper piston and slides to actually retract the one pad into the bore any measurable amount, but enough to relieve most of the residual pressure of the pads against the rotor. My theory all along has been that they used the clips from the factory in earlier years for the primary or sole reason of reducing drag and maximizing the fuel mileage numbers they could put on the stickers - very important to the manufacturers back then - the marketing people probably had a pretty high dollar value ("premium") on every tenth of an mpg they could claim, which translated into engineering effort to squeeze the design for mpg improvements even if it cost $0.20 per vehicle.

The effect of the clips on braking is a little more pedal distance for onset of braking effect (to go from slight drag to full contact and force). That delay of braking onset doesn't affect braking force once the pads are back in full contact with the rotor.

You certainly wouldn't want the clips for competitive or performance driving due to the delay of braking onset, but would not be a problem for regular street driving for most people.

You do have to apply slightly more pedal pressure to counteract the clip spring pressure, but I would not think that that extra pedal pressure is noticeable.

(2) It moves the pads outward on the diameter of the rotor by the thickness of the clip (1/16"). That's not much, but the effect is to increase braking effect. The increase in brake torque would be linear. The increase in brake power is a power of 2 (square) effect.

The increase in pedal pressure needed to counteract the clip spring pressure and the decrease in pedal pressure required to get the same braking effect due to the pads being spaced 1/16" further out on the rotors offset each other to some degree, and I suspect the net effect is small and probably not noticeable. Again, I think that any noticeable change is more likely due to a change in pad material - unless you say that you replaced the pads with the same brand and type.

I don't know if you replaced the rotors, but of course old rotors would be smooth, possibly glazed, and new rotors would have a slightly rough finish.

If it would be worth it to you, you could go in and remove the clips and see if they are making a difference. :)
 

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What brand and type pads did you have on it, and what's on their now? That can make a big difference.

Here is what the "Dubya" clips affect:
(1) They put a small amount of outward spring pressure on the pads - not enough to overcome friction of the caliper piston and slides to actually retract the one pad into the bore any measurable amount, but enough to relieve most of the residual pressure of the pads against the rotor. My theory all along has been that they used the clips from the factory in earlier years for the primary or sole reason of reducing drag and maximizing the fuel mileage numbers they could put on the stickers - very important to the manufacturers back then - the marketing people probably had a pretty high dollar value ("premium") on every tenth of an mpg they could claim, which translated into engineering effort to squeeze the design for mpg improvements even if it cost $0.20 per vehicle.

The effect of the clips on braking is a little more pedal distance for onset of braking effect (to go from slight drag to full contact and force). That delay of braking onset doesn't affect braking force once the pads are back in full contact with the rotor.

You certainly wouldn't want the clips for competitive or performance driving due to the delay of braking onset, but would not be a problem for regular street driving for most people.

You do have to apply slightly more pedal pressure to counteract the clip spring pressure, but I would not think that that extra pedal pressure is noticeable.

(2) It moves the pads outward on the diameter of the rotor by the thickness of the clip (1/16"). That's not much, but the effect is to increase braking effect. The increase in brake torque would be linear. The increase in brake power is a power of 2 (square) effect.

The increase in pedal pressure needed to counteract the clip spring pressure and the decrease in pedal pressure required to get the same braking effect due to the pads being spaced 1/16" further out on the rotors offset each other to some degree, and I suspect the net effect is small and probably not noticeable. Again, I think that any noticeable change is more likely due to a change in pad material - unless you say that you replaced the pads with the same brand and type.

I don't know if you replaced the rotors, but of course old rotors would be smooth, possibly glazed, and new rotors would have a slightly rough finish.

If it would be worth it to you, you could go in and remove the clips and see if they are making a difference. :)
Wow that鈥檚 some info very interesting read. I had powerstop pads before with the the W clips. When I replace The Front brakes Like 3 months ago I use akabono Pads with raybestos Coated rotors. The difference I feel is the pedal pressure is more firm and it come rightway as soon as I press the pedal . Before it was not as firm or quick even when the previous pads were new.
 

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Of the pads you mentioned, what is their "type"? Ceramic, semi-metallic, other? Semi-metallics in general will give higher friction (and therefore a perception of firmer pedal). "Ceramic" is a very broad range of compositions, but in general are lower friction than semi-metallic.

The more immediate onset of braking could be due to removing the clips. The firmer feel could be due to a combination of no clips and the pad friction, or just due to higher friction pads. Higher friction pads = perception of firmer pedal because you feel much greater brake effect with lighter pedal pressure. The absence of spring pressure from the clips could contribute to that, but I wouldn't expect that to be a big effect - I could be wrong. It boils down to how the total caliper piston force was divided between compressing the "spring" (clip) and actually pressuring the pads to rotor.

As I said, the only real way to know would be to swap new clips back in and out with the exact pads and rotors you have right now. Probably not going to happen, eh? :)
 

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Of the pads you mentioned, what is their "type"? Ceramic, semi-metallic, other? Semi-metallics in general will give higher friction (and therefore a perception of firmer pedal). "Ceramic" is a very broad range of compositions, but in general are lower friction than semi-metallic.

The more immediate onset of braking could be due to removing the clips. The firmer feel could be due to a combination of no clips and the pad friction, or just due to higher friction pads. Higher friction pads = perception of firmer pedal because you feel much greater brake effect with lighter pedal pressure. The absence of spring pressure from the clips could contribute to that, but I wouldn't expect that to be a big effect - I could be wrong. It boils down to how the total caliper piston force was divided between compressing the "spring" (clip) and actually pressuring the pads to rotor.

As I said, the only real way to know would be to swap new clips back in and out with the exact pads and rotors you have right now. Probably not going to happen, eh? :)
There were all ceramic pads , I bought a new set of W clips, I鈥檒l put them in this weekend and see if they make a difference 馃し馃徎鈥嶁檪锔 .
 

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The W clips I felt they made a difference on pedal feels. So I switch on to the bar type hardware and I think they are great felt no different like I didn鈥檛 have them and noise is reduced.
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That works. Good research!
 

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Clip Master !
 
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