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Discussion Starter #1
Just got off the expressway drove two miles to home and pulled into the garage. Came out three minutes later and I hear this gurgling sound under the hood. So I lift the hood and the overflow canister is just bubbling away inside of itself. Not overflowing but kind of like percolating. So I start the car and it stops. Fans not running and the temp gauge is mid scale. Slightly hotter than normal and coming down as the car sits there running.
If figure it's latent heat building up since I just got off the eway.
I shut off the engine and it did not do it again. Fluid level is good.
Never seen this before on the Trep. Any ideas? Thanks!
 

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I hit **** with sticks!
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Check the radiator cap and boiling point of the antifreeze. If there is an improper antifreeze to water ratio, the boiling point will be low (too much water), and from sitting after a run on the road on a warm day, it might have went above it, and started to boil.
 

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im with those guys,, but what do I know,, ?? it might be the loose nut behind the steering wheel,,, LOL
 

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I vote Cap also. (or lack of system pressure.)
When you shut the engine off coolant stops flowing around in the block.
Localized "hot spots" cause temp to rise above the boiling point of the coolant. Proper pressure raises the boiling point higher to prevent the gurgling.
When you restarted localized hot spots were cooled enough to stop the process
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I vote Cap also. (or lack of system pressure.)
When you shut the engine off coolant stops flowing around in the block.
Localized "hot spots" cause temp to rise above the boiling point of the coolant. Proper pressure raises the boiling point higher to prevent the gurgling.
When you restarted localized hot spots were cooled enough to stop the process

well then.... time for a new cap! thanks yall!
 

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Check the radiator cap and boiling point of the antifreeze. If there is an improper antifreeze to water ratio, the boiling point will be low (too much water), and from sitting after a run on the road on a warm day, it might have went above it, and started to boil.
Backwards, antifreeze has a lower boiling point then water. Antifreeze does what it's supposed to, keep water from freezing. The farther from freezing winter temps the less antifreeze you need to mix in with.

In some cases it's actually 'illegal' to use any antifreeze. Case in point, the race tracks. No vehicle racing is allowed to use it because of it being very slippery on tracks.
 

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buy a lever vent cap made by stant, will run you about 4-6 bucks. It also looks better than the factory ones lol.
 

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Backwards, antifreeze has a lower boiling point then water. Antifreeze does what it's supposed to, keep water from freezing. The farther from freezing winter temps the less antifreeze you need to mix in with.

In some cases it's actually 'illegal' to use any antifreeze. Case in point, the race tracks. No vehicle racing is allowed to use it because of it being very slippery on tracks.
Antifreeze, does also raise the boiling point fyi, and a properly mixed coolant system will have a higher boiling point than straight tap water.
 

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Antifreeze, does also raise the boiling point fyi, and a properly mixed coolant system will have a higher boiling point than straight tap water.
Unless they changed the formula it lowers the boiling temp and that's info from every mechanic I've talked with after have 2 engines overheat and crack due to having too much antifreeze in it. They all have told me to run just water during summers. That's what I did in Vegas and never had an issue and in fact the car ran cooler with just water.
 

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Antifreeze, does also raise the boiling point fyi, and a properly mixed coolant system will have a higher boiling point than straight tap water.
Unless they changed the formula it lowers the boiling temp and that's info from every mechanic I've talked with after have 2 engines overheat and crack due to having too much antifreeze in it. They all have told me to run just water during summers. That's what I did in Vegas and never had an issue and in fact the car ran cooler with just water.
Devan is correct. You have it backwards. Antifreeze increases the boiling point of water....however, the system pressure also increases the boiling point....so if you have a pressure leak, you will have a lower boiling point, but not as drastic as an improper mixture.

Engines will overheat in most cases with too much antifreeze, you are correct there. Antifreeze by itself has a lower boiling point. For the antifreeze to work properly, it takes the proper mixture of both to achieve the correct boiling point....(hence the danger zone on your antifreeze tester) and the word "coolant" should be used instead of antifreeze.....habit...

Your engine will run fine on straight water, as long as it doesnt reach the boiling point....which with a good cap and pressurized system would be around 225-230 at operating temperature. However, when antifreeze is added, it will take the boiling point to 250-260 on a 50/50 mix.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The pressure that builds up in the system is what keeps the coolant from boiling. At our power/steam plant we have plain old pure water at 600 degrees f at 2350 psi and until we lower the pressure steam/boiling does not occur.
Additives in the coolant protects the metal but I doubt it effect boiling point significantly. (not as much as the pressure cap does)
 
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