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I'm trying to decide whether to rebuild a 2.7 (that spun two bearings, #3 & #4) myself, get a short block or supply the parts to a builder and have them put it together. I know at least one rod is shot from the stress as it's has burnished metal on the bearing race. It was only run for about one mile and didn't overheat.
In my research I've read that the pistons and rods are considered an assembly and matched for weight. I can get new rods but nothing is ever written by the suppliers about the weight nor is it noted on the rods themselves. I'd like to press out the piston pins so I can provide new rods to the builder but I don't know if I'd be making things ore complicated than they need to be.
Please excuse my writing. Sometimes "word" won't let me delete a letter.
Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 

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I hit **** with sticks!
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I've never heard of the weight matching, but as far as Mopar OE is concerned, the pistons are sold as a piston/rod assembly. Pistons/rods are available separately in the aftermarket.

I dont see weight matching being a concern; as long as the aftermarket stuff is built to OE spec it will be fine and will be the proper weight --- be careful here, cheap rods off of amazon are suspect; there are tons of counterfeit parts out there from other countries, especially on amazon etc; that are complete garbage.

The pistons and cylinders will need to be checked for wear as well, these engines are susceptible to piston slap if the pistons are even slightly worn. In my experience, if you are going this deep, I would mic all cylinders, bore as needed, replace all pistons regardless of how many rods need replaced. Any rods you think are still good, just need to check their bores and make sure they are in spec still. Usually there is not an issue with a rod unless there was a spun bearing or oil starvation.

I would suggest having the engine builder swap the rods; since they are press in; unless you are sure you have the proper tools to do it; if you've got a shop press, ok, but its a different process than pressing out a ball joint or bushing, there may be a depth or clearance spec involved---plus an oil clearance spec on the rod-wrist pin.

Be careful supplying your own parts to a builder, generally, if they agree to do it at all, it will void your warranty.
 

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I hit **** with sticks!
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37,890 Posts
The crankshaft will also need to be addressed if you had a spun bearing. Quick and easy way is a crankshaft kit. Otherwise the original will have to be ground to repair the journals where the bearings spun.
 
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