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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a standard on the order of crimping a straight through cable for Cat. 5? I ran a network for my dad's union hall and I did the cat 5 heads in this order:

1-Orange
2-Orange W
3-Blue
4-Blue White
5-Green
6-Green White
7-Brown
8-Brown white

Well all the lights let up on the 4 port Linksys Router, but I couldn't get the computers to read each other for anything. All the lights lit up, including the WAN port for the DSL modem. I was puzzled. I tried messing with all the router settings, then I read the book for the linksys router. It had its own special order for the cat 5 crimping
1-Orange W
2-Orange
3-Green W
4-Blue
5-Blue White
6-Green
7-Brown White
8-Brown

I re-crimped all the heads and everything worked, I also happened to notice that a pre-made cat 5 cable I had was crimped the same way. I thought as long as it was the same wiring on both ends it would work? I guess not. I proceeded to crimp the cat 5 jacks and heads at my new house the way the linksys book had it also.

Any of you network guys know about this?
 

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that sounds weird. i didn't have that problem when i wired a small office. beginner's luck? probably.

if i do it more often i'm bound to screw up.
 

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The way the book showed you is the way I learned in my cabling class, but as long as the wires all meet at the correct spot at the end, the color doesn't make a difference.

Weird.....

Funny little story that happened in my cabling class.... We had just learned about CAT5 cabling and we had to remember what cabling standard was to be used for computer to computer (crossover) and from different hardware to different hardware (straigh-thru)

For some odd reason my friend and I had the hardest time remembering this....so being the educated people we are, we put it to a song...

This is what we sang to remember that "like" hardware got crossovers:

"Cross like an Egyptian"

We are so lame....

So anyway, during finals...I'm doing my test, and halfway across the classroom I hear, "Cross-like an Egyptian" and the whole class just busted out laughing...Something I'll never forget anymore.

[ September 02, 2001: Message edited by: Intrepidatious ]
 

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It doesn't matter which colors you use, but to make it easier for anyone that has to work on your installation in the future, you should adhere to the standard colors as mentioned in your linksys manual.

It is however important to make sure that cable pairs are used on the correct pins.

Pins 1 and 2 should be a pair
Pins 3 and 6 should be a pair
Pins 4 and 5 should be a pair
Pins 7 and 8 should be a pair

If you do not wire it up like this, you may not get true 100Mbit compatability.
 

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Here is a diagram of how it should look if you want to have a "standard" cable:
http://yoda.uvi.edu/InfoTech/rj45.htm

Note that there are two common standards for color sequence on CAT5 RJ45 connectors - 568A and 586B. 568A is/was primarily used be telecom guys whereas 568B is the most widely used standard for data networking. While you can use whatever color sequence you want (as long os the opposite end of the cable matches or has the correct crossovers), I would recommend that you use the 568B standard as your techie buddies may look at you weird if you use any other scheme. :D

You need a straight-through cable if you are connecting a PC to a hub/switch (or any other device that performs the crossover internally) and you need a cross over cable if you are simply plugging two PCs togther as no crossover occurs internally in that situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies guys. I'm glad I did crimp the standard way at my new house. That way when my friends come over for lan parties (a way they like to say to mooch of my DSL connection), their store bought cables will work.
 
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