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Discussion Starter #1
I am really interested in getting to know my car better.. :smilie_la

I was wondering if there are courses that I could take that might be like certification classes so that I could get more hands on technical help/advice/training/education. Or if there were online places w/tutorials taht I could do to learn these skills. I'm pretty much starting out from scratch, but I learn fast, and I love the challenge of learning something new! :)
 
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For a full blown school look up UTI. They have a location in MA but I cant use my benifits with them yet because its a new location and they havent gotten approval.
 

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Useless
Technical
Institute


:D

no, seriously, UTI is good at some stuff, but basic automotive/performance automotive is not one of the strong points. the kids that come out of there...well...need help. part of the problem is that it's all book learning and no hands on, no dealership experience. so when they go out to get a job, they don't even know basic stuff like brakes/belts/tires. and the free toolbox you get...about the only thing good for is a wheel chock.

I would suggest getting a job at a jiffy lube or something, to get your hands on cars, and to see if you really are cut out for the job. From there, look for a manufacturer-specific community college 2 year program if you want to get into cars and make any money at it (what little there is to be made :( ).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
95PGTTech said:
part of the problem is that it's all book learning and no hands on, no dealership experience.
^^that's exactly my dillema. I read on here ALLLL the time.. and soak up as much as I can, but there's really no substitution for hands on knowledge that you can get by working in a lab settings.

ANd I can't get a job at jiffy lube... I work as a web developer for a big company :D
 

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Phrozt said:
^^that's exactly my dillema. I read on here ALLLL the time.. and soak up as much as I can, but there's really no substitution for hands on knowledge that you can get by working in a lab settings.

ANd I can't get a job at jiffy lube... I work as a web developer for a big company :D
rofl, yeah, that would not work. I'd suggest finding a forum with cars you are interested in, and then asking to come over and help out.

People ALWAYS love someone to bullshit with at a meet/mod day, especially if they bring beer and pizza. :3some: DI.net is not the best place for this, most stuff done on here is cosmetics.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
even cosmetics is fine.. I like soakin up whatever stuff is around.

But yeah, I was doing some training in springfield for my job (I live in decatur) and there was a guy who had previously messaged me on caraudio.com to say hi, because he was in springfield. He let me stop by and see what he was working on one day after training... and he helped me plan how I was going to run my wiring.. so it worked out nicely.
 

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Ok, i have a real good suggestion for a guy in your situation. First buy a Haynes manual for you car. And spend some time reading the procedures for some of the more routine stuff, like oil changes, filters, brake overhaul. I would not recommend a factory manual for a beginner. Then buy a nice roll around tool chest full of common mechanics tools, metric. Make friends with someone at the office that does his own repairs to help you get started the first few times. If you can read and follow simple directions and have some manual dexterity you can probably handle all of the common maintenance issues. As for more advanced diagnosing, that comes with experience and some skills in electronics. Or you can just guess and change parts till it works like most "real" mechanics do!! Good luck, Jeff
 

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I took a 18 month coarse in Autobody repair and I can tell you if you want to learn you can learn anything you want to at a tech school. Mine was not even a high dollar tech school just a local community college.

However 80% of the people there just goofed off, and didn't learn but one or two areas. The problem with the community colleges is enrolement is usually so low they can't boot the bad apples to improve the course.

Anyways my two cents if you really REALLY want to learn autos, then a tech school is a good low cost option. I had a minority scholarship when I went so I didn't pay a dime for my 18 month certificate other than books and lab fees, but had to pay for the remaining 12 monthes to get a degree. I was the only one in the class who did go back for the degree. Even without a scholarship I think the coarse was only around $12k which is real cheap for that much training.

If you ask why I got the minority scholarship, I am not lazy and didn't want to pay for it, but when I was 18 I didn't know what I wanted to do with my life and that was free so I did it. Also I am not black, hispanic, or female, but I was out of my class there were 3 white guys and like 23 black guys. It being a historically black school they were trying to encourage whites to enrole. It was fine for me I made some good money as a body shop dude for a few years before I decided to get an Air conditioned job.

Just as a forward statement, none of this post is intended as a racial comment, I am just explaining the truth that me a white guy did get a minority scholarship. I never felt bad though because all but one person was either on Pell Grant, disability, work release, or some other type of financing. One other white guy did pay out of his pocket. And yes there was a clipboard on the wall that the work release guys had to sign ever two hours to verify that they were in school so their parole officer or some dude checked, if they missed a day without an excuse usually they never came back because they got sent back to the farm, jail, looney bin or where ever they came from.

It was funny a guy explained to me how to steal a Buick Regal without causing any damage to it. I was like how did you learn that, and all he said was, "Why do you think I have to sign the clipboard every day?" So I was like Oh yeah.
 

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jeff3.5Lincolumbus said:
Or you can just guess and change parts till it works like most "real" mechanics do!!
That wasn't a very nice thing to say. Granted, many people among the mechanic/technician buisness are not very smart, but a few elites do actually know what they're doing or know how to figure out the answer to the problem they have at the least cost to the customer.

I'd like to see the "know it all" customers do a better job.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
mrlull... how often and at what times did these classes meet?

Like I said, I have a full day of work everyday. If they meet at night or on the weekends, I'm game, but I can't sacrifice that then which pays my bills!
 

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95PGTTech said:
DI.net is not the best place for this, most stuff done on here is cosmetics.
BULLS**T!!
unless you call engine swaps cosmetic!
 

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I like you wanted more hands on experience with modern cars, but i didn't want to devote the time and money into taking a formal class, since i don't intend to go into that career. I took an auto's class in high school, but they really didn't teach us all that much...


What i did, is got together with two of my friends, and bought up a 1992 Chevy Astro Van with about 150K miles on it for about $1000. (split 3 ways it aint that bad ;) ) We picked up a haynes manual for it and parked in it my friends garage and over the course of a year completly dissassembled and reassembled it. The only thing we didn't take apart was the trans. We bought all the special tools we needed to rebuild the engine. We probably spent another $700 on tools and a gasket set and new piston rings and bearings for the engine. Overall, it was a great learning experience and a lot of fun.

After all is said and done, we now have all the tools needed to repair anything that goes wrong with any of our cars. it's pretty sweet.

When we finished the van, we took it offroading :D That thing was a blast to get airborn in! It came down hard on the oil pan, and that was the end of it, but damn was that fun!
 

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So you wanna learn about cars?

So, you wanna learn how to fix EVERYTHING?

Then get a car that has EVERYTHING wrong with it, say a 1982 Chevy Impala Diesel or an 80s Cadillac with an HT4100! Both would set you back, maybe 500 bucks and you will get MANY opportunities to FIX it!

Both cars will teach you electrics and mechanics in no time at all! :D

Oh and lets not forget RTV sealant 101 and the Advanced Gunk Removal classes that both cars offer! Yup, a car and classroom rolled in to one greasy package!

Oh, don't forget the Chilton manual, and a Mopar car to ferry you around to the parts houses!
 
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