DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Our rear disc brakes are wearing down, and I will be relining the pads soon, but sometimes the parking brake doesn't work that well, and I was thinking about changing the shoes. There have been times I drove the car almost a mile before I realized the parking brake was set, and I am concerned the shoes may be crystallized. Other times, the brake seems to work OK.

Confused.

First generation Concorde LXi, 3.5 engine.
 

·
I hit **** with sticks!
Joined
·
37,750 Posts
I would inspect them, see if they are in tact, make sure the cables are adjusted properly;

The parking brake shoes are just meant to hold the car; and stop it once, or twice, in an emergency. Usually they can stand being accidentally applied once or twice; but if they were working properly, you would have instantly noticed the brake was on, as it would be very difficult to move the car.

If you were able to drive at all with the parking brake engaged, normally that means there is an issue with one of the cables, either its out of adjustment, broken, stretched, or otherwise. Sometimes it can be the shoes too, I've seen the shoes come free from their webbing and be laying in pieces inside the back of the rotor. Other than that if you are up north, the mechanism that engages the shoes tends to rust up and they dont operate freely, can stick on, or off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm going to tackle the pads tomorrow, and I will take a look at the shoes too. Are the shoes automatically adjusted by the brake cable? I live in the south, so salt spray is not that big an issue around here, although there may be some gunk in there that needs cleaning up as you said.

Some have said the shoes are hard to remove due to the parking brake cable tension, but I'm not quite sure what they mean since parking brake pedal will be disengaged during disassembly. Is there any type of grease seal that needs replacing during the procedure? I think the bearings are sealed, but I assume the shaft will need some fresh grease during reassembly.

I don't guess there's any way to remove the shoes without pulling the inner hub are there?

Also, is it a good practice to turn (resurface) the hat part of the rotor after turning the rotor itself (if I am going to replace the shoes)?
 

·
I hit **** with sticks!
Joined
·
37,750 Posts
Yes, the adjustment of the brake cable directly affects the shoes.

Its not hard to remove the shoes; they are similar to a standard brake drum shoe; the cables are attached to the actuators so you dont have to mess with them if you are just changing shoes.

Bearing hub is sealed; not serviceable. It is a good idea to lube the brake shoe actuators, even in the south there can be some rust; and the factory grease there is long gone by now.

Its a bit more tricky to remove the shoes with the hub in place, but not really that big of a deal to pull it off.

Replace the rotor rather than turn; thats the general practice nowadays; its been years since I've had an LH car rotor turned, due to time and cost mostly; if you get a new rotor you get a new parking brake drum too; for the price it just makes more sense to replace it; I cant remember if the rear rotors can be turned at all, some couldnt due to the type of metal;

Again, parking brake shoes are just meant to hold the car, not stop it; so if the parking drum on the inside of the rotor is not perfect, its no big deal; however, if there is excessive rust or damage, then replace the rotor. If you have to mash the parking brake to stop the car in an emergency its not going to matter whether the parking brake drum is perfect or not.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,960 Posts
Anymore, it's most practical just to replace the rotor if it needs turning. The minimum allowed thicknesses don't allow much wear plus turning.

Also, because hardly anyone has them turned anymore, not many shops have the turning equipment, and even if they do, people aren't trained to do it properly, so you often end up with problems, and there's definitely not enough metal to turn them a second time to correct a problem, so all the more reason to just replace with new.

Even if you do find someone to turn them, you pay almost as much as new rotors, and the new rotors are less time and hassle, with less risk of problems.

(Dan and I were composing our posts at the same time.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for posts.

I live near a local mechanic that turns them for 10.00 apiece (if I remember correctly), although if the hat cannot be turned, maybe just forget that area. I'll check on the price of new rotors, and I will mic the old ones to see if they can be turned.

Does the hub / shaft require axle grease at all?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Just a followup here.

I replaced the brake pads, and I had the rotors turned within specs for only $15.00 total.The parking brake shoes looked OK for their age, so I did not mess with them for now, but I think this must be the first time the pads have ever been replaced since the rotor retention clips were still in place.

I'll replace the shoes later on when the weather is better.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top