DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For anyone who has changed their transmission fluid themselves, do you have any tips?

Besides buying four quarts of ATF+4, what else would I need?

I'm thinking a filter and possibly a gasket, do they come together as a package? Are parts from the auto parts stores as good as the Mopar items?

I've read the FSM for the procedure, is there a preferred method for draining out the old fluid?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Whenever I do a trans service I always get like 6 quarts just in case. And if you dont need them just return them. Better to be over-prepared. Also every trans service I do from now on will include a bottle of Lucas transmission treatment, which just replaces one quart of ATF. That part is entirely up to you, but I have seen that stuff work magic on Dodge trannys. ABSOLUTELY get a filter. They are dirt cheap and super easy to change while the tranny pan is down. It SHOULD include a new gasket but better check anyway.

Changing the fluid is really not that big of an undertaking. Just takes a little time.

BTW if its your first time i would recommend wearing crappy clothes cause it can get messy!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,600 Posts
Supplies :
* More quarts of ATF+4 than you think you'll need.(return unused)
* Tube of Mopar RTV specifically for trans pan (dealer item)
* Filter (Mopar filter will have new oring seal in package. If package opened, check for o-ring)
* Plastic putty knife or pry tools. The factory RTV makes it hard to seperate pan from trans
* Coarse rags to get old sealant of trans housing and pan lip
* paper towels(lint free a plus) for final cleaning of pan and sealing surfaces
* denatured alcohol or brake cleaner to clean with
* Large drain pan to collect ATF dripping from trans while you work with pan off

Also, I had a cheap fluid pump and pumped out as much ATF as I could(through dipstick tube) the night before I dropped the pan. Then before I dropped the pan, I pumped out the stuff that drained down out of the transmission overnight. That way, ATF doesn't splash all over the place when you are wrestling the pan off the trans housing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,778 Posts
definitely do what SC said with the pump. If you can, buy a pump type pump not a squeeze type pump. Or even better, a drill operated pump will be the quickest. The thing is with our cars, the trans pan is "glued" to the tranny with the RTV. So you will likely need to tap the pan with a rubber hammer before it comes loose. You definitely don't want to do that with a pan full of fluid.

After you get the pan off and replaced the filter, you will need to scrap the edge of the pan and the edge of the tranny clean of the old RTV so that everything will seal right. So you need a relatively sharp scraper for that. Also clean the bottom of the pan (and the magnet) of all the crap. Also while you are at it, check the edge of the pan to see if it is straight. Sometimes when people did the change previously, they over torque the bolts and cause the pan edge to become uneven. If that is the case, you will need to straighten the edge before you install otherwise you will have leak.

You can use the mopar RTV or the gasket that comes from the filter to seal the pan. RTV is the recommended but I've always used the rubber gasket. Never had a leak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Dodge's manual recommend MOPAR ATF type 9602 (in my case Intrepid 2.7L,42LE).
I bought Mr.Gasket filter(gasket include).I used 6 quart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,600 Posts
RE: pan glued to the transmission case.

I had a decent rubber mallet and I wacked on the pan to try and get it to break free. It won't.

As mentioned the RTV acts like a glue just as much as a sealant. Some people say to take a blade or utility knife or whatnot to slice the RTV. I tried that and did not have enough room to angle the knife properly so as to not score the transmission sealing surface. So I tried the wack-a-mole approach. The RTV absorbs the impact = FAIL. I ended up using a metal putty knife I think. I tapped it in at the corner of the pan with the mallet if I remember correctly. After I got prying down a little, the rest of the pan popped free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,600 Posts
You know, after struggling with the pan, cleaning, working on my back, I took my other LH car to the dealer and let them do the service. Used a coupon they sent in the mail. I think it was less than $100
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
You know, after struggling with the pan, cleaning, working on my back, I took my other LH car to the dealer and let them do the service. Used a coupon they sent in the mail. I think it was less than $100
A lot of the places around me do it in the 50 dollar range but what they call a "service" is pumping out the old fluid and putting in new, without changing the filter. So if you go that route make sure the filter gets changed too. As im sitting here now smelling of tranny fluid and damn near soaked in it from the service I just did on a jeep, I am half tempted to just take my vehicles in from now on and let someone else piss with it, as long as they change the filter and clean the pan!!
 

·
yippee ki yay
Joined
·
5,811 Posts
As im sitting here now smelling of tranny fluid and damn near soaked in it from the service I just did on a jeep, I am half tempted to just take my vehicles in from now on and let someone else piss with it, as long as they change the filter and clean the pan!!
i feel your pain....i've gotta do a solenoid pack replacement on one of my treps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
i feel your pain....i've gotta do a solenoid pack replacement on one of my treps
Yea no doubt RJ, sometimes you come out clean afterwords but most of the time thats not the case.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,048 Posts
A lot of the places around me do it in the 50 dollar range but what they call a "service" is pumping out the old fluid and putting in new, without changing the filter...
Does that mean pulling it out thru the dipstick/fill tube and refilling, or is it a reverse flush that removes most of the stuff that is collected in the filter? There are so many variations on fluid changes that it is important to find out exactly what is done and how.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Does that mean pulling it out thru the dipstick/fill tube and refilling, or is it a reverse flush that removes most of the stuff that is collected in the filter? There are so many variations on fluid changes that it is important to find out exactly what is done and how.
From what I have heard, its just pumping it up the dipstick tube and refilling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,778 Posts
From what I have heard, its just pumping it up the dipstick tube and refilling.
I'm pretty sure these 50 dollar services are the ones that splice in the machine using the tranny cooling lines and reverse flush. The reason why they can be so cheap is they use the wrong/cheap type of fluid. If you want to use ATF +4, you would have to pay for the 50 to 60 bucks of fluids and then pay the 50+ for the service.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,048 Posts
I'm pretty sure these 50 dollar services are the ones that splice in the machine using the tranny cooling lines and reverse flush. The reason why they can be so cheap is they use the wrong/cheap type of fluid. If you want to use ATF +4, you would have to pay for the 50 to 60 bucks of fluids and then pay the 50+ for the service.
True. Even if it's sucking only half the fluid (5-6 qts.) up thru the dipstick/fill tube, that's $30 worth of fluid if they're only charging $5/qt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
I have owned a lot of cars in my life, and have never changed the auto tranny fluid. I just monitor it. If it stays red and doesn't smell burned then I leave it. I don't plan on changing any tranny fluid any time soon. It's just one of those things that can end up causing more problems than it solves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I replaced the water pump on my 99 Intrepid and undid the upper transmission line to the radiator. Plugged it to prevent dirt from getting in. When done, I forgot to plug the transmission hose back into the radiator and when starting the vehicle, the pressure blew out the plug and I lost some transmission fluid.
Not knowing how much loss there was, I added transmission fluid, approx one pint. Let the vehicle warm up to normal temp. Checked the dipstick and it was bone dry. Added more, slowly. Kept checking and still the dipstick was dry. After adding a quart, it was still dry.
I was following the procedure outlined in the manual. I read online that other people have same experience. I don't want to overfill.
Anyone know why the dipstick does not read fluid level?
Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
either you don't push it in far enough, or the level is too low.
are you on a flat surface?
only reason for a dry dipstick is low fluid.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,048 Posts
Service fill is 4.5 qts., overhaul fill is 9.3 qts.

Don't know how low it has to be to not show at all on the dipstick.

Zat help? Might just need to add another qt. or two?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thank you for your responses.
The reading was done on level ground, fluid hot.
What I'll be doing is replacing the transmission filter and then refilling it with 4 qts, as the manual says and then adjust after that. This should solve problem.
Question: How many qts does the torque converter hold? I cant find any info on that.
Shipping 6 qts overseas, since the vehicle is in Europe. Hope it'll be enough.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top