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Discussion Starter #1
I was asking my brother yesterday about this and he wasn't too sure, so i'm running it by you all. I hope there hasn't been a post about this already, I did a search and found nothing.
I've got the '01 motorsports edition with the sport-tronic (or whatever the correct term is) shifter in it. When I'm in 4th gear and head up a hill it almost sounds like my car shifts down. As if there was a low and high speed for each gear. My brother said that dodge, sometime in the late 90's came out with a torque converter for truks that worked similar to the way this sounds. When it (what ever IT is) kicks in my rpm's will jump from say 2k to 3.2k or so, then i down shift into 3rd and it jumps up to 4k or 4.5k.
can anyone please splain to me what this is?


Thanks guys,
 

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The "downshift" you here is the torque converter "unlocking". In the late seventies torque converters got a clutch built in to reduce power loss once highway speeds were reached, they were CRUDE and gave a noticable thud when they engaged. In the LH platform cars the clutches were allowed to gently slip into gear to give the impression of not even being there. When you accelerate with autostick in 4th the computer wants more revs and you have removed its ability to downshift, it can only release the built in clutch to get the revs where the 3.5 makes power and does.

FYI. a torque converter couples the engine and trasnmission in virtually all auto trans cars at this point in time.

I am not usually into Wikipedia, but this is a great write up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_converter
 
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The "downshift" you here is the torque converter "unlocking". In the late seventies torque converters got a clutch built in to reduce power loss once highway speeds were reached, they were CRUDE and gave a noticable thud when they engaged. In the LH platform cars the clutches were allowed to gently slip into gear to give the impression of not even being there. When you accelerate with autostick in 4th the computer wants more revs and you have removed its ability to downshift, it can only release the built in clutch to get the revs where the 3.5 makes power and does.

FYI. a torque converter couples the engine and trasnmission in virtually all auto trans cars at this point in time.

I am not usually into Wikipedia, but this is a great write up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_converter
Nice reply.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The "downshift" you here is the torque converter "unlocking". In the late seventies torque converters got a clutch built in to reduce power loss once highway speeds were reached, they were CRUDE and gave a noticable thud when they engaged. In the LH platform cars the clutches were allowed to gently slip into gear to give the impression of not even being there. When you accelerate with autostick in 4th the computer wants more revs and you have removed its ability to downshift, it can only release the built in clutch to get the revs where the 3.5 makes power and does.

FYI. a torque converter couples the engine and trasnmission in virtually all auto trans cars at this point in time.

I am not usually into Wikipedia, but this is a great write up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_converter

Thanks a TON,
I wondered if that's what was going on. I've only got a 3.2 right now, but I feel very sure that this is what's happening.
Thanks again for the help!
 
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