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Where do you guys get it and is there a place to buy new? I just can't believe I can't fix this problem. ......
See my response in the thread at the bottom here if you are talking about the firm rubbery gasket material.

You can repair weatherstripping sections with good quality generic door/trunk auto weatherstripping from the parts stores. It is closed-cell firm stuff in various cross section shapes (not the squishy open-cell stuff). I believe there are still a few companies that make quality stuff, but also a lot of China junk on Amazon, so the best bet is to go to a good local auto parts store, or better yet an auto-body repair supply shop, which will likely have it, and may even have rolls of the stuff available cut to length.

This is not anything new, people have been repairing car weatherstripping like this for decades. Up to a few years ago, NAPA and Carquest in the US had a big paper catalog where you could select from various cross-section shapes and sizes of weatherstripping (in different lengths), but the selection is limited now, to mostly rectangular shapes and a few others, but you can make it work. It won't look pretty when you open the door or trunk, but it will seal out rain if done carefully.

It does take some patient careful cutting, and then glueing with the special Permatex or 3M weatherstrip adhesive to make sure it seals the to the metal and remaining good weatherstripping. I have repaired my door weatherstripping this way a few tiems, since finding junkyard donor cars is difficult these days and the remaining new-old-stock stuff on ebay in the US is overpriced. Another possibility though is using weatherstripping with a similar cross-section from any other junkjard donor car and glueing in a patch section. Using stuff like RTV, Shoe Goo, or similar to make repairs to weatherstripping doesn't work very well since it doesn't seem to last; your best bet is to fit the repair sections and glue them to the metal and intact weatherstripping with the special weatherstrip adhesive.

As far as windshield and rear glass rubber seals, a good specialty auto glass shop may be able to improvise with the various seals they have available (comes on rolls also). After all, they can still get glass for many older cars and have to seal it. The guys that do mobile glass repair obviously won't have much of a selection, you have to take the car to a shop.

The hardest things to repair are the seals and trim below the roll down side glass, though I am improvising the rubber trim pieces on those with some cut and shaped body side moulding (tedious with Dremel). The part that "wipes" on the glass as it goes up and down might be able to be improvised somehow from a different donor car, but thankfully those are still good on my car.

 

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.... I bought a special tool to cut the rear window seal loose from the car. Then I cut the rear windows out of the junk yard car and my car (that was a giant pain in the butt to do). Then I had the car painted with no rear window in it. After the car was painted, I took it to a glass shop with very good reputation and had them install the glass with the good molding that I got from the junk yard - it was a risk because if they had done a sloppy job, it would have been some cost and a lot of trouble for no gain. They did a perfect job - it looked factory. But, as you already said: no more cars in the junk yard.
I am curious if the glass shop told you that they could no longer get the glass for your car, or could not get the windshield seal that they would need. I was told by a good local shop that 1st and 2nd Gen LH glass was still available from some suplliers (there are several), and they had a large number of rubber windshield seal cross-sections to choose from (since there are so many OEM shapes). But I haven't had them try to actually order the glass yet to confirm this. Sometimes suppliers have things listed, but you don't find out that it is no longer in stock untill you place an order. I just have a small 6" crack on the side of my windshield that was previously repaired with the UV-cured windshield resin (does work for short cracks), but it is on my list to replace.
 

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Holy crap you are brilliant ....wow ,I never thought to cut the tube from the metal that sits on the body of the car and glue another tube .I'm going to look around for the tube that's similar in diameter and shape with what we have on our cars and see if I can fix this. I do care very much about how it looks when I open the door...the details on my cars trigger me like the pronouns folks get triggered ...I just throw money left and right to fix my stuff ,ain't burning buildings ...yet lol......
Sorry, but like I said, glueing in replacement weatherstripping, either the generic kind or what you get from a different junkyard car is not going to look pretty when you open the doors or trunk. It is just meant as a jury-rig fix when you can no longer get the factory weatherstripping or a junkyard match. Like I wrote in the post on the other thread, you've also got to use the black 3M or Permatex regular or "super" (stronger) weatherstripp adhesive. They also have yellow for some reason which looks bad.

I don't know about the other issue since I've got a 1st Gen, but they also had a weird problem with the door weatherstripping being too short, and there was a TSB about putting in some sort of a clip to stretch it. I just wound up cutting it and putting in a splice piece of the generic weatherstripping. Again, it aint gonna look pretty, and I'm obsessive about stuff too. But no one's gonna see it with the door and trunk closed, and you've got to keep out the rain.

I feel for you though outside the US, because the only place I've been able to get NOS Mopar parts at a reasonable price is off US ebay, and some of them don't ship international. The remaining online Mopar parts stores here are usually very expensive for the stuff they still have in stock for LH cars except for small hardware parts. You can still get aftermarket mechanical/electrical parts from the auto parts stores, but for body parts the few remaining cars in junkyards here are the best source. The older a car gets, the more jury-rigged stuff you have to do, unless it is a classic car where most body parts are still made by the aftermarket.
 

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Makes me wonder if there's other car out there that has weatherstripping that would fit ours. I hope one day there will be an aftermarket brand that will make weatherstripping for our cars ...or at least someone will figure out which car has the exact match weatherstripping to fit our cars. I keep looking at 2010+ BMW 5 series....for some reason the seals on them look like they would fit ...I'm really close to vandalize one lol
Like I wrote in the other thread, years ago NAPA and Carquest here had a big paper catalog with lots of different cross-section shapes and sizes for car weatherstripping. I think the auto-body repair suppliers that sell to the body shops still can get sevreal types, but you may have to buy more than you need. See below for one company that makes decent quality door/trunk weatherstrip & seal.

To glue in a patch length on my 1st Gen, I wound up just getting a rectangular shape at a parts store (O'Reily Auto here, I think) that was close in size to the OEM tubular weatherstripping, and just thick enough to seal when compressed a bit by the door. Don't get it too thick though, or the door/trunk won't close. Some brands come with an adhesive backing with a pull-off paper strip, but you still need the adhesive to glue it to the undamaged weatherstripping on either side (see photo below). If the self-stick adhesive comes off after a while you can obviously use some small dots of the weatherstrip adhesive to glue it back in.

In any case, you've got to clean and dry the surfaces well for the adhesive strip or glue to stick.

The plain rectangular weatherstripping I got is the "Universal Seal Weatherstrip" - manfufacturer is Metro Moulded Parts. They make several sizes, and also have different cross sections and many types of door and trunk seals - a lot of the stuff is for different classic cars, but some stuff may approximate the OEM shape (don't know). They also make all sorts of other rubber car parts. Amazon in the US has a lot of their stuff if you search on Metro Moulded Parts and "seal" or "weatherstrip," or by the MMP part number. Local parts stores may also be able to order it. As I wrote before, Amazon also has a lot of cheapo Chinese weatherstrip/seal (with weird brand names) that is poor quality.
Photos:
Cosmetics Electrical tape Circle Ingredient Electronics accessory



Not pretty, but seals out the rain:

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Bumper
 
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