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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2001 Concorde that overheats after about 10 kilometers of driving. The temp needle goes right up, light comes on. There is fluid in the overflow that is boiling and bubbling. When it is cold there is a sloshing sound coming from the heater core. The fluid level in the resevoir is at the correct level when cold. I have replaced the both the coolant cap and thermostat(in right way) and bled the system. I had to take it to the dealer because of the drain cock which would not close all the way and started leaking. They bled the system, replaced the coolant and preformed a pressure test which was fine. I took the car back and the symptoms started again. Any ideas? Water pump? Blocked heater core? When I took the thermostat out the chanels seemed clear. It is currently with the dealer....$$$$$$$
 

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Cooling fans functioning?? These fans are prone to failure...especially the low temp fan that runs the most. If you do a search, you'll see more than one thread on them! :biggrin:

Also...if one fan dies, it can take out the relay which will cause both fans not to run.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Both fans are working, I don't believe the dealers idea of a worped block causing the engine to overheat. The coolant showed max when cold and the heater core still made the sloshing sound....sounds like something is restricting the flow causing an air block....I think maybe the rad or heater core is caked up....It takes different amounts of time before it does eventually overheat...If the block was to blame would it not run shi**y and heat up a little faster? These guys are doughheads...three of them were looking at it before they closed...they want to look at it again tomorrow. He has quoted me 10-11 hours to re & re the block to check for warpage.....
 

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If you think it's stopped up you might try the Prestone Flush on it (as a last ditch attempt) but it may be nothing more than an air pocket.

These things are almost notorious for being hard to bleed, though I don't understand why ...
 

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Netjunky said:
Both fans are working, I don't believe the dealers idea of a worped block causing the engine to overheat. The coolant showed max when cold and the heater core still made the sloshing sound....sounds like something is restricting the flow causing an air block....I think maybe the rad or heater core is caked up....It takes different amounts of time before it does eventually overheat...If the block was to blame would it not run shi**y and heat up a little faster? These guys are doughheads...three of them were looking at it before they closed...they want to look at it again tomorrow. He has quoted me 10-11 hours to re & re the block to check for warpage.....
Even though you already had enough fun with filling and bleeding, the sloshing sound from the heater core would indicate air is still in the heater core. Have you tried reverse flushing the heater core? Another thing to check would be your radiator fins and A/C condenser core fins, they could be loaded with dead bugs and or dirt.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just got the car back from the dealer...they recommend block removal or long block replacement. I just drove it 15 min home and no problems. They said it only heats up on the highway. All the way home the heater core was sloshing around at every start. When I got home and the engine was hot, I tried to open the bleeder valve on the top of the engine and all I got was air for a while. Is this normal? I starting to think the rad is blocked or the water pump is slipping....? They did a compression test, pressure test and it all checked out. I might remove the rad and check for a blockage. When it is cold there is very little coolant in the top rad hose?
 

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Maybe I am all wet here.
But I would back flush the heater core first off. Very easy to do. Any mechanic can do it. Secondly I would flush the whole system out is things don't improve.

If you are getting a flow of coolent through the radiator, through the block, through the heater core and if the thermostat is running right and operating (and trust me I would put another new thermostat in there for darn sure right now), then there is no obstruction and if the fan is working and turning on then there has to be no problem unless a coolant temp sensor (right after the thermostat towards the engine) is goofed up.

Can't be more that the above...
 

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This sounds TOO familiar!

Wow! My car was doing the same crap.

After changing a stuck thermostat, there were more issues.

Here's what it turned out to be:
40% clogged radiator
Worn timing belt

The timing belt drives the water pump, the toothed side does not drive the waterpump, the smooth side of the belt does, so maybe your belt is slipping on the pump pulley.

Since the toothed side of the belt drives the cams, your car will run just fine... until it gets hot.

If they did a compression test and a pressure test and that checked out, the only thing else that could be up with the engine might be a combustion gas leak, get a combustion gas leak detector additive at Autozone. It will turn the coolant a different color if you are leaking combustion gases.

If compression was good, chances are there will be no combustion leaks, but test it anyway, the kit is inexpensive.

If that test passes, the engine is fine and you need to start looking at just the cooling system.
 

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Netjunky said:
When I got home and the engine was hot, I tried to open the bleeder valve on the top of the engine and all I got was air for a while. Is this normal?
No. Not normal. That means you've got air in the system, and it needs to be purged. Sloshing noise from the heatercore is also a dead giveaway that there's air in the system. Flush it, then bleed it a couple times. Gotta get all the air pockets out!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I checked the timing belt for slippage and it looks good, I can even read the part number. I took the upper rad hose off and the aluminum duct looks shiny, no residue other than coolant. I have searched on the net and found that a leaking head gasket can cause exhaust emissions to go into the coolant....I might try that exhaust detector...
 

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Hard to believe (not) that dealer didn't do coolant gas check, also appears they did not bbleed system (unless antifreeze is getting into cylinder through head gasket) I would highly reccomend you cut your losses with THAT dealer and try a local independent. Keep a good close eye on coolant levels, bleed at operating temps. Use Mopar antifreezer for your engine (2.7, 3.2,3.5)
 

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2002 FSM said:
STANDARD PROCEDURE - COOLING SYSTEM FILLING
WARNING: MAKE SURE ENGINE COOLING SYSTEM IS COOL BEFORE REMOVING PRESSURE CAP OR ANY HOSE. SEVERE PERSONAL INJURY MAY RESULT FROM ESCAPING HOT COOLANT. THE COOLING SYSTEM IS PRESSURIZED WHEN HOT.
CAUTION: Do not use well water, or suspect water supply in cooling system. Use only a 50/50 mixture of the specified ethylene glycol type antifreeze/coolant and distilled water. (Refer to LUBRICATION & MAINTENANCE/FLUID TYPES - DESCRIPTION).
(1) Close radiator draincock by turning the stem clockwise to the 3:00 o’clock position. Hand tighten only.
(2) Install engine block drain plugs, if removed.
WARNING: WHEN INSTALLING DRAIN HOSE TO AIR BLEED VALVE, ROUTE HOSE AWAY FROM ACCESSORY DRIVE BELTS, ACCESSORY DRIVE PULLEYS,
AND ELECTRIC COOLING FAN MOTORS.
(3) Attach one end of a 6.35 mm (0.250 in.) ID clear hose that is approximately 1200 mm (48 in.) long, to the bleed valve.
- Bleed Valve Location (2.7L): Located on the water outlet connector at the front of engine (Fig. 5).
- Bleed Valve Location (3.5L): Located on the lower intake manifold, left of center and below the upper intake plenum (Fig. 5).
(4) Route hose away from the accessory drive belt, drive pulleys and electric cooling fan. Place the other end of hose into a clean container. The hose will prevent coolant from contacting the accessory drive belt when bleeding the system during the refilling operation (Fig. 5).
(5) Open the cooling system bleed valve (Fig. 5).
(6) Attach Special Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel to pressure bottle filler neck (Fig. 6).
(7) Use the supplied clip to pinch overflow hose that connects between the two chambers of the coolant bottle (Fig. 6).
CAUTION: Do not mix coolants. If coolant is used other than specified, a reduction in corrosion protection will occur.
(8) Pour a 50/50 mix of Mopart Antifreeze/Coolant, 5 Year/100,000 Mile Formula and distilled water into the larger section of Filling Aid Funnel (the smaller section of funnel is to allow air to escape). For system capacity, (Refer to LUBRICATION & MAINTENANCE - SPECIFICATIONS - FLUID CAPACITIES).
(9) Slowly fill the cooling system until a steady stream of coolant flows from the hose attached to the bleed valve (Fig. 5).
(10) Close the bleed valve and continue filling system to the top of the Filling Funnel.
(11) Remove clip from overflow hose (Fig. 6).
(12) Allow the coolant in Filling Funnel to drain into overflow chamber of the pressure bottle.
(13) Remove Special Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel. Install cap on coolant pressure bottle.
(14) Remove hose from bleed valve.
(15) Start engine and run until it reaches operating temperature.
NOTE: The engine cooling system will push any remaining air into the coolant bottle within about an hour of normal driving. As a result, a drop in coolant level in the pressure bottle may occur. If the engine cooling system overheats and pushes coolant into the overflow side of the coolant bottle, this coolant will be sucked back into the cooling system ONLY IF THE PRESSURE CAP IS LEFT ON THE BOTTLE. Removing the pressure cap breaks the vacuum path between the two bottle sections and the coolant will not return to cooling system.
(16) Shut off engine allow it to cool down. This permits coolant to be drawn into the pressure chamber.
(17) With engine COLD, observe coolant level in pressure chamber. Coolant level should be within MIN and MAX marks. Adjust coolant level as necessary.
NOTE: The coolant bottle has two chambers. Coolant will normally only be in the inboard (smaller) of the two. The outboard chamber is only to recover coolant in the event of an overheat or after a recent service fill. The outboard chamber should normally be empty. If there is coolant in the overflow side of the coolant bottle (after several warm/cold cycles of the engine) and coolant level is within MIN and MAX marks, disconnect the end of the overflow hose at the fill neck and lower it into a clean container. Allow coolant to drain into the container until emptied. Reconnect overflow hose to fill neck.
2002 FSM said:
DIAGNOSIS AND TESTING - COOLING SYSTEM DEAERATION
As air is removed from the cooling system, it gathers in the coolant bottle. This pressure is released into the atmosphere through the pressure valve located in the pressure cap when pressure reaches 96 - 124 kPa (14 - 18 psi). This air is replaced with coolant from the coolant bottle, when the system is allowed to cool.
NOTE: Deaeration does not occur at engine idle— higher engine speeds are required. Normal driving will deaerate cooling system. To effectively deaerate the system, multiple thermal cycles of the system may be required.
While "deaeration" is still going on you have to watch the coolant level pretty close (check when cold). If it falls too low you'll get more air into the system ...
 
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