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People - I have run over 100K miles with both the P0456 and P0440 codes on my 3.2 and 3.5 engines in the same car.

Peva has provided some where the main source of the leak maybe located. I didn't want to drop a gas tank when I owned my LH and lived with the code.

My advise - get the engine fixed and running smooth. Live with those two EVAP codes. Read your codes monthly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
People - I have run over 100K miles with both the P0456 and P0440 codes on my 3.2 and 3.5 engines in the same car.

Peva has provided some where the main source of the leak maybe located. I didn't want to drop a gas tank when I owned my LH and lived with the code.

My advise - get the engine fixed and running smooth. Live with those two EVAP codes. Read your codes monthly.
Yeah that has been the MO on a lot of my cars. But honestly I'm sick of looking at the light and dealing with getting it through inspection with this failure. I'd like the car to function how it was designed. The issue I have is I don't see that replacement part online to even buy.
 

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Is that really the only place to get one? That's not exactly what I would want to put on this car. Especially since my garage kept 80k mile car had it fail years ago. Doesn't inspire confidence in a jy part.
I honestly have no idea. Have you located a replacement part number? If you figured out the part number maybe you could find one laying on the internet somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·

They have a fuel valve control kit listed with part number 5080751AA but obvi discontinued and ebay shows 0 results....

Junkyard might be your only bet.
I am personally going to buy a mopar gas cap and hope my p0456 goes away because that is the most simple solution.
Thanks. I'll check with Dodge tomorrow if I remember. They're supposed to finally get my tensioner o ring in. Hopefully it's the right one. Had to wait over 2 weeks for it.
 

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Smoke tests are ineffective as an accurate test for small evap leaks. I'd recommend a shop that can use a vacuum monitor to help locate the leak. This is more often than not a time consuming job just to find the leak. So, be prepared to fork out a hefty diagnostic fee. The test uses vacuum instead of smoke and a drop gauge that is highly responsive to a small leak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Smoke tests are ineffective as an accurate test for small evap leaks. I'd recommend a shop that can use a vacuum monitor to help locate the leak. This is more often than not a time consuming job just to find the leak. So, be prepared to fork out a hefty diagnostic fee. The test uses vacuum instead of smoke and a drop gauge that is highly responsive to a small leak.
Yeah I had a feeling it might only leak under vacuum. I have an ac vacuum pump. I guess I could adapt it somehow. Any idea how they actually test that using vacuum? Smoke test obviously shows where it's leaking, but vacuum would pull into the line and not show where the leak actually is.
 

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The reason the leak may not show with smoke is because the "Smoke" may have a constitution that is larger than the leak. I know this sounds weird but visible smoke is only good to a leak of 0.40" IIRC. If your leak is .020" or thereabouts, it may not pass enough of the smoke to be visible. You mentioned that the leak may only be present under vacuum, which isn't exactly how the system works. For the system to register a small leak, it has to lose "X" amount of volume over time, under pressure. Time can be up to a week with some systems. If you had a FSM, it may help figure out the most likely source of the leak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
The reason the leak may not show with smoke is because the "Smoke" may have a constitution that is larger than the leak. I know this sounds weird but visible smoke is only good to a leak of 0.40" IIRC. If your leak is .020" or thereabouts, it may not pass enough of the smoke to be visible. You mentioned that the leak may only be present under vacuum, which isn't exactly how the system works. For the system to register a small leak, it has to lose "X" amount of volume over time, under pressure. Time can be up to a week with some systems. If you had a FSM, it may help figure out the most likely source of the leak.
Ok good to know. Is the system really that sensitive that it will detect a leak that small? Also FSM... Flying spaghetti monster?
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
An excellent question! Sorry about the acronym. Most folks tend to refer to the Factory Service Manual as "FSM."
Lol I don't spend a ton of time online. I probably should have known that. I have all data so should have what I need. What could I look at that would show me? That's why I was thinking management valve but I have no way to actually test it for a leak that I'm aware of.
 

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So, back when I was a spoiled dealership tech, we had something like this:


Basically, it has a small ball inside a tube, like a hollow thermometer.
When calibrated, the ball would float in the tube at a specified value. If there was a leak, you could dial-
in the rate of loss to test your system. The drawback was in testing large areas, like the gas tank which
would often take a long time to calibrate due to the capacity of air it holds.

Also, these are quite expensive, so if you have confidence in your hoses and other parts that aren't too
difficult to get at, you might be able to buddy up with someone who has access to one.

Use of an A/C vacuum pump or other hand held squeeze pump isn't recommended as the diaphragm in the
NVLD is pretty sensitive to extreme testing.

In rare circumstances, the PCM was unable to properly run the small leak test without errors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
So, back when I was a spoiled dealership tech, we had something like this:


Basically, it has a small ball inside a tube, like a hollow thermometer.
When calibrated, the ball would float in the tube at a specified value. If there was a leak, you could dial-
in the rate of loss to test your system. The drawback was in testing large areas, like the gas tank which
would often take a long time to calibrate due to the capacity of air it holds.

Also, these are quite expensive, so if you have confidence in your hoses and other parts that aren't too
difficult to get at, you might be able to buddy up with someone who has access to one.

Use of an A/C vacuum pump or other hand held squeeze pump isn't recommended as the diaphragm in the
NVLD is pretty sensitive to extreme testing.

In rare circumstances, the PCM was unable to properly run the small leak test without errors.
Yeah I've got one of those. That's how I smoke tested with zero leaks found. How can I use that guage to find exactly where the leak is? Rip the system apart a section at a time and test?
 
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