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Discussion Starter #1
I mentioned this in an earlier topic I posted, but here is a new topic with pictures. It appears I have a coolant leak on the outside of the motor, around the intake manifold and below the driverside cylinder head. here are pictures to better explain it:




Circled the leaking areas:





Any ideas to what is causing this? I replaced the top rad. hose and no luck. I'm guessing its the intake gasket. in the first pic, it looks like coolant comes down from the intake gasket and puddles there.

thanks
 

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i had the same problem with my 3.3 after changing the water pump. found out that the head Gasket was bad and replaced them and it stopped, that might be the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Well, I found the problem, and I can't belive I havent noticed it till today:



Thats where the bolt head was...now its just a stud. Now, I have no clue how long its been like that, but would the broken bolt cause the intake manifold to warp? or if I just stick a new bolt in there, torque it to spec would it be fine? I took the broken stud out and put a bolt in there temporaraly until I can get a new one tomorow at the dealer.


please don't say head gasket. if it is, I'll dump some stop leak in it and trade it in.
 

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That may be your whole problem. Replace the bolt, torque to spec, and let it go for a week. You might want to clean up the previous spills so any new leak will be more noticeable ...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've noticed the leak has seem to have gone away with the temp. bolt in its place. I'll still get a stock bolt as the one I have in there now is shorter and metal. I washed away the old coolant and so far, no leaks. As D76G12 suggested, I'll watch it for a week. If it starts leaking again, I'll replace the intake gasket and the manifold. Some of the coolant was coming out of the bolt hole with the broken bolt. I had a similar problem with my acclaim when one of the thermostat bolts was loose.
 

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Well, also be careful. There are 2 diff length of bolts for the lower intake. The one that i am guessing is stuck, was stripped and rusted at the end? If so the wrong bolt was in there. The shorter bolt liek the one you have goes nicely into the hole etc but dosen't go down into the coolant passage. The other one that is liek 1/2 inch or so longer goes into the pasage where it gets coverd and rusted in **** and makes it a ***** to get out. So make sure what yahave in there isn't going into the coolant other wise yo umay have the same problem down the like if you ever try to take it out
 

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Discussion Starter #8
well, the bolt I used was shorter than the one I took out. It came out very easily, even with the busted head. Hopefully the dealer will know which one I need.
 

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Matt86 said:
Well, I found the problem, and I can't belive I havent noticed it till today:



Thats where the bolt head was...now its just a stud. Now, I have no clue how long its been like that, but would the broken bolt cause the intake manifold to warp? or if I just stick a new bolt in there, torque it to spec would it be fine? I took the broken stud out and put a bolt in there temporaraly until I can get a new one tomorow at the dealer.


please don't say head gasket. if it is, I'll dump some stop leak in it and trade it in.
How did you get the stud out?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
update:

went to the dealer this morning and got a new bolt. It was the same size as the old one, but this one had a head! Put it in, torqued it down to spec, drove it around for a while and so far, no puddles developing. There was a tiny bit of moisture along the very edge of the intake, where it meets the head on the driverside. I couldn't even get it on my finger the amount was soo small. I'm guessing its some old coolant from when the bolt was broken. I'll keep my eye on it for the rest of the week. I got the gasket set just incase if it is still leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Grrr. the gasket is leaking. I cleaned off the entire front area of the intake, ran the car and watched closely and I did see a tiny tiny amount of coolant seeping between the head and the intake manifold. It eventually evaporates and leaves this green gunk. I must admit, it's better than what it was before (having pools of coolant) but it's just enough to make me want to replace the gasket. I'll do it this friday.

Now, since the fuel rail/injectors needs to come off, should I get new O-rings for the injectors? What else should I get aside from the gaskets?

Thanks.
 

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I haven't taken the intake off this car but I'd replace the O-rings just on general principles. You're in there and the O-rings are cheap - why would you reuse the old ones ...?
 

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Just for you Matt86 !!! :

Intake Manifold

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION


3.3L Engine

See Figures 1 through 20

The intake manifold is a tuned two-piece aluminum casting with individual primary runners running from a plenum (the upper part of the manifold). The intake manifold assembly is cored with upper level EGR passages for balanced cylinder-to cylinder EGR distribution. These openings should be inspected and cleaned if necessary whenever the manifold is removed for service. Use care when working with light alloy parts. Do not over-tighten any fasteners or the casting may be damaged.

Disconnect negative battery cable.

Remove the fuel filler cap. Release the fuel system pressure using the recommended procedure.

Drain the cooling system.

Disconnect the air tube from the air cleaner and the throttle body.

Hold the throttle lever in the wide-open position and remove the throttle cable and the speed control cable from the lever. Compress the locking tabs on the cables and remove from the mounting brackets.


Fig. 1: Compress the locking tabs on the throttle and cruise control cables and remove them



Unplug the electrical connector from the solenoid on the EGR valve transducer, MAP sensor, throttle position sensor and the idle air control motor.


Fig. 2: Disconnect the solenoid from the EGR transducer




Fig. 3: Label and remove any vacuum hoses attached to the intake manifold



Disconnect the vacuum hose from the PCV valve as well as the power brake booster at the intake manifold nipple. Disconnect the vacuum line at the fuel pressure regulator.


Fig. 4: Disconnect the electrical harness leading to the MAP sensor




Fig. 5: Disconnect the vacuum hose from the PCV valve



Disconnect the purge hose from the throttle body.

Unplug the electrical harnesses from the throttle position sensor and the idle air control motor.


Fig. 6: The throttle position sensor is located on the side of the throttle body, disconnect it



Remove the EGR tube mounting screws at the intake manifold plenum.


Fig. 7: Unscrew the EGR mounting tube at the intake plenum



Remove the intake manifold plenum (upper part of the manifold) mounting bolts and remove the plenum from the engine. Cover the lower part of the intake manifold to prevent foreign material from entering the engine.


Fig. 8: Remove the intake manifold plenum mounting bolts




Fig. 9: Double check everything is detached, then lift the plenum off the lower manifold




Fig. 10: Fill the lower intake openings with clean rags



Disconnect the fuel supply and return tubes to the fuel rail at the rear of the intake manifold by pushing the quick-connect fitting toward the fuel tube while depressing the built-in disconnect tool with Quick-Connect Fitting Tool 6751. To disconnect the fitting from the fuel rail, slightly twist the fitting while maintaining downward pressure on tool 6751. Wrap shop towels around the fuel hoses to absorb any fuel spillage.


Fig. 11: Disconnect the fuel supply and return tube quick-connect fittings art the rear of the manifold



Cover the fuel line openings to prevent system contamination.

Remove the screw from the fuel clamp and separate the fuel tubes from the bracket.


Fig. 12: Remove the fuel rail mounting bolts



Tag each connector for identification, then disconnect the electrical harness from the injectors and turn toward the center of the engine.

Remove the fuel rail mounting bolts and lift fuel rail with the injectors attached straight up and off the engine. Cover the injector openings.

Remove the upper radiator hose, heater hose and the rear intake manifold hose.


Fig. 13: Loosening and tightening sequence for the intake manifold bolts-3.3L engine



Remove the intake manifold bolts and the manifold from the engine.


Fig. 14: Remove the intake manifold bolts ...




Fig. 15: ... then lift the manifold from the engine carefully



Remove the intake manifold seal retainers screws and remove the intake manifold gasket. Clean all mating surfaces.


Fig. 16: The intake manifold gasket cannot be removed until the retainers are removed




Fig. 17: The retainers are held in by screws on the ends of the block




Fig. 18: Now you can easily lift the intake gasket off the engine block



Inspect the manifold for damage, cracks or clogged passages. Repair, clean or replace the manifold as required.

To install:

Verify that all intake manifold and cylinder head sealing surfaces are clean. Place a drop of sealant onto each of the four corners of the intake manifold gasket, where the cylinder head meets the engine block. Carefully install the intake manifold gasket and tighten the seal retainers to 105 inch lbs. (12 Nm).


Fig. 19: Apply a bead of sealant on each of the four corners of the intake seating



The intake manifold gasket is made of very thin metal and can cause cuts if handled carelessly.

Install the intake manifold and eight mounting bolts. Snug down evenly to just 10 inch lbs. (1 Nm).

Tighten intake manifold bolts in the proper sequence to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). Once all bolts are tightened, repeat the sequence again tightening the bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). Inspect to make sure all seals are still in place.

Apply a light coat of clean engine oil to the O-ring on the nozzle end of each injector.

Insert the fuel injector nozzles into the openings in the intake manifold. Seat the injectors in place and install the fuel rail mounting bolts, tightening to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm).

Attach the electrical connectors to each fuel injector. Rotate the injectors toward the cylinder head covers.

Reconnect the fuel supply and return tubes to the fuel rail. Be sure that the black plastic release ring to the quick-connect fitting is in the OUT position. Place special tool 6751 under the largest diameter of the quick-connect fitting.

Pull Tool 6751 toward the fuel rail until the quick-connect fitting clicks into place. Place the special tool between the shoulder of the built-in disconnect tool and top of the quick-connect fitting, then inspect the security of the fitting by applying a slight downward force against the fitting. It should be locked in place.

Install the intake plenum with new gasket onto the intake manifold. Loosely install the mounting bolts.


Fig. 20: Tightening sequence for the intake plenum-3.3L engine



Install the EGR tube to the manifold with new gasket in place. Loosely install the mounting screws.

Tighten the intake manifold plenum mounting bolts to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm) following the outlined sequence.

Tighten the EGR tube mounting bolts.

Reconnect the PCV valve hose and power brake booster hose.

Attach the electrical connectors to the EGR transducer solenoid, idle air control motor, map and throttle position sensors.

Install the throttle cable and speed control cable to the mounting bracket and connect to the throttle body lever while holding lever in the wide-open position.

Reconnect the purge hose to the throttle body. Reconnect the air tube to the air cleaner and the throttle body.

Drain and replace the engine oil and oil filter.

Reconnect the negative battery cable. Refill the cooling system. Run the vehicle with the radiator cap removed until the thermostat opens, adding coolant as required. Watch for fuel and coolant leaks and for correct engine operation.

Once the vehicle has cooled, recheck the coolant level and add, if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
thanks!

I'll pull a couple of intake manifolds at the junkyard to practice and to get an extra one incase if mine is warped.
 

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So, you didnt have to remove the intake to get that bolt out. Just curious because I have a similar problem. About 40k miles ago I replaced my valve cover gaskets and noticed when I had it apart that there was a loose bolt on the lower intake. Well it wasnt loose it was broken I pulled most of the bolt out. I have never touched it since and assume its not leaking(its not the end bolt like yours its like the third one in). Someday I might end up changing it but it seems like it will be a ***** to get the rest of the bolt out and I dont know if more will break on the way out so be aware! You might want to get a bolt extractor set and some drill bits. Good luck and put a post up when your done. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It was the bolt right next to the thermostat housing. I removed the coolant temp. sensor to better access it.

I have a few extra bolts I bought at the dealer incase if one or more of them decided to snap, or are allready broken. I'll also grab some from the junkyard. I got a few more supplies today (injector O-rings) and on thursday I'll go to the yard to grab a spare intake and some more bolts. If all goes well, friday will be the day I do the gasket. If not, it will be the next friday. It's not that big of a problem. I probabily loose a tablespoon of coolant a week.

I'll take pics of the process and write up a how to. I did that with the water pump. I guess you can call me Matt the cooling system man!
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Also, is it really necessary to drain the oil after the project? My oil is clean and un contaminated.

edit:

also, is there a difference between the 1993-1997 Intake manifolds? I plan on grabbing a spare from the yard just incase if mine is bad. thanks!
 

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if your trep is a 3.3 the lower intakes are the same, and the uppers are too. i have a few spares laying around from a few porting projects ive done over the past two years, also while you have it out, you may want to take a dremel and to a half way port job on the lower intake. the upper opening and lower openings are large, but in the midle where it shifts from square to rectangle its really restricted, so you may want to clean up that area a bit, it doesnt take a large amount of skill as long as you take your time to do it right and dont get carried away. the point isnt to enlarge the ports, the point is to smooth up the tranistion from square to rectangle. its another one of those things that you may as well do while you have the chance. you wont see much in the lines of power, but a slight increas in economy and power will be there due to the better flow properties of the intake. also it increases flow a good bit, because even though you arent enlarging the ports, you are removing alot of restriction.
 
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