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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My tire goes pretty flat in about 2 months if I don't fill it. I used a can of fix a flat for truck tires today that is supposed to be used for nail size holes. I can't find a hole at all in mine, just a slow leak.

Think it will work?
 

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mix some water and dishwashing liquid and put it in a spray bottle. Spray the tire with the mixture. watch for areas where it keeps bubbling. Thats where your leak is. You may have a chance of repairing it.
 

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More then likely you have a bead leak, while the fix a flat may help the tire gys are going to hate you next time you buy tires

That stuff makes a huge mess inside the tires and sticks to the rims so they end up having to do a lot more clean up before putting new tires on
 

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More then likely you have a bead leak, while the fix a flat may help the tire gys are going to hate you next time you buy tires

That stuff makes a huge mess inside the tires and sticks to the rims so they end up having to do a lot more clean up before putting new tires on
a bead leak may explain why he loses air so slow.
 

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Do you put air in it at all in those 2 months? Have you run if very low for a few miles? If so you've probably overflexed the sidewall and the tire is junk. Fix a flat might be a good short term solution.
What I would do is to let most of the air out, add the fix a flat to inflate, run it about 3-5 miles, and then at someplace with an air hose let the air out again and re-inflate with air. When you go get a different tire mounted on there eventually MAKE SURE you tell the service tech that you've added fix-a flat to the tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That stuff makes a huge mess inside the tires and sticks to the rims so they end up having to do a lot more clean up before putting new tires on

I am definitely getting my next tire put on at Firestone! I hate those pricks.
 

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It could be a sidewall leak. Do you have steel wheels or alloys? If its a sidewall leak, you can totally deflate the tire, place the wheel and tire on the ground and find a way to seperate the rim from the bead. You can jack up another corner of the car and lower that tire onto the flat tire. You raise the car and rotate the wheel until its completely seperated. Then you take a wire brush and scrape all the corrosion.

You might also have a nail in the tire or something. There are patch kits out there for under $5 that work wonders. I have used these twice with great results.
 

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Take it to a tire shop. The shop here will throw it in a bathtub looking thing to find the leak and if its a bead leak they will fix it for like 10.00.
 

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I agree with NHogan. The other spot that causes problems is the valve stem. It is most likely the bead or the stem. If you have chrome wheels, they are notorious for corrosion. My '99 LHS had the chrome wheels, and I was always having them repaired or pumping them up. The problem is galvanic corrosion set up by the different metals in contact. Based on my experience, I would never want chrome-plated wheels again! Good luck!
 

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NHogan I have to agree with you on taking it to a tire shop and have them throwing it into a tire tub and check it for air leaks.

That way, if there is a leak, they will notify you about it and let you decide on what to do.


That Fix-A-Flat junk is not worth what it is made of. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn't. You will never know. I have seen what it can do from when I was in college taking automotive course (Got a degree in that - Associates Degree), and it isn't pretty.
 
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