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Where is the best place to get parts? I have 2000 Intrepid 2.7 with 63k. It needs new timing on it and I was going to throw in oil and water pumps. I’d like to save some money but still get quality parts. Any suggestions for the job would be appreciated too.
 

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The dealer on those particular parts. Otherwise you're wasting your money.
 
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Where is the best place to get parts? I have 2000 Intrepid 2.7 with 63k. It needs new timing on it and I was going to throw in oil and water pumps. I’d like to save some money but still get quality parts. Any suggestions for the job would be appreciated too.
ive been using 1a auto since they typically have good prices&shipping imo, got my suspension and steering parts from them
 

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I agree with both replies above. 1AAuto has decent parts, but not quite OEM quality. For parts like the oil pump and timing belt where the engine needs to be torn apart to replace them, I would only go with OEM/Mopar parts. Sure it might cost more, but if you only have to do the job once, isn't that worth the extra cost? For something like brakes or suspension, if you get a defective part and and it fails in a week or two, it's not THAT big of an issue to swap it out with a warranted replacement. But to have to tear the engine down again because a part failed withing a week or two? I would be absolutely livid.
 

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Locally, your best bet for quality parts is Carquest or NAPA (where repair shops buy their parts). Always pay a little more get their premium line - they will have Carquest or NAPA on the box, but are made by good aftermarket companies. They were under pressure years ago from places like Auto Zone with their cheapo parts, so they started carrying an economy line in some parts also. However, the economy line parts are lower quality, and often don't last (avoid). Unfortunately, when Advance Auto bought Carquest, they closed many stores, but there are a few left.

After that, I would use O'Reily or Advance Auto online catalogs and look for the brand name parts (e.g. Moog suspension, Fel-Pro, Victor-Reinz, Champion, Dorman, Standard Motor Products [SMP], etc.]). Just looking around on the online catalogs you can get a sense of which are the good product lines that you've probably heard of (more expensive) and which are the cut-rate cheap products from commie China (again, avoid). Unfortunately Auto Zone carries a lot of crappy parts, so I would avoid them if possible. Be aware that a lot of the young guys working at these local stores (other than Carquest and NAPA) are not very knowlegable these days, so I'd do my own searching on their websites and take in a printout page of what you need. If you go into the store, try to find an older guy for help - but many have retired due to the Covid scare. The Carquest and NAPA guys are usually pretty good, but they will assume that you know what you are doing, and may be less helpful if they are busy (go in on a weekday).

As far as online, I've used Rockauto.com for years. Very easy to use website. They have parts from all the major aftermarket manufacturers (e.g. Moog, Fel-Pro, SMP, etc.) and group them by premium,"daily driver" (supposedly OEM quality), and economy (so you can get an idea of which manufacturers make the best parts.) Always best to get the premium or at least daily driver parts. As I wrote, the economy parts these days may come from commie China and may be junk - avoid them. They also have "manufacturer closeout" parts which are marked way down. For example, the Carquest parts from closed stores show up. I bought a bunch of Carquest branded premium Moog "problem solver" suspension parts for probably a quarter the regular cost (by the way, beware that Moog also has/had an imported lower-quality economy line). Rockauto ships from a few warehouses, so sometimes you wind up paying multiple shipping charges, but you can try to select different parts so they come from one warehouse (they are coded with a little icon to show you). Some of the car forums online also regularly post 5% off promo codes if you Google "rockauto" + "promo code." As I recall, you enter it into some oddball place on one of the checkout screens. After your first order, I think they will also e-mail you the 5% off promo code for next order (has expiration date.)

If you search on Rockauto and find the part number for a good quality part, you can also go to Amazon to check their price. Amazon has weirdo pricing policies, and sometimes marks parts way down. Amazon carries lots of auto parts, but I'd only buy directly from Amazon (shown in the list of vendors), not their "marketplace" sellers, since returning a wrong part to them will be a hassle. It is also worth checking the parts numbers sometime on the hot rod sites Summitracing.com or Jegs.com for certain parts like mufflers or cat converters.

The local Dodge/Chrysler dealer parts are obviously good quality but are sometimes very expensive. There are some Dodge/Chrysler dealers that run their own websites with better prices if you search on things like Mopar parts or Chrysler parts or Dodge Parts, but you have to know what you are doing on those sites to get the exact part number you need from the parts catalog diagrams on the sites. Unfortunately, it is also hard to know if these are reputable dealers, and most will not accept returns, except with a huge restocking fee. Obviously some Dodge/Chrysler dealers are decent and some are sleazy (you can check their actual dealer name & physical address for complaints on their state/local Better Business Bureau site and also see if they are a BBB member). I ordered before from a couple of these online dealers years ago. See this old thread for some info (but may be outdated now):

Unless you have one of the big OEM parts catalogs, the Rockauto site is easier to use than wading though the Mopar parts catalog (which can be a little confusing unless you understand their format). They used to have pdfs of the big Dodge parts catalogs and service manuals on the old version of this site dodgeintrepid.net, but I'm not sure where they are now on the site (see that old thread above). The parts catalog has diagrams of the parts and the Mopar part numbers. Obviouisly you need the right catalog for your year (they cover several years). You could search around the site or just ask a moderator. I have a hard copy of the Dodge parts catalog for my '94 (they are big and heavy in a 3-ring thick binder). They come on sale on ebay sometimes along with the service manuals. Once you have the parts catalog, you can also search on ebay with the exact part number since there are guys who bought up whole lots of Chrysler/Dodge parts when the Chrysler buyout cut back the number of local dealers years ago.

The whole premium/economy part thing is very annoying these days, but lots of manufacturers and parts stores are doing it due to the competition from Autozone cheapo parts. So just be aware of that and that you may see two parts for your application from the same manufacturer. The more expensive one will obviously usually be the premium part. And the made in USA or Europe or Taiwan or Japan part will almost always be better than those made in commie China (PRC) or other Asian countries. The China parts are really bad. Same deal obviously for tools (new USA-made tools are very expensive these days [check flea markets for used], but Japan and Taiwan make good tools.) Avoid Harbor Freight commie China tools - they can break and injure you; seen it happen.
 

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Locally, your best bet for quality parts is Carquest or NAPA (where repair shops buy their parts). Always pay a little more get their premium line - they will have Carquest or NAPA on the box, but are made by good aftermarket companies. They were under pressure years ago from places like Auto Zone with their cheapo parts, so they started carrying an economy line in some parts also. However, the economy line parts are lower quality, and often don't last (avoid). Unfortunately, when Advance Auto bought Carquest, they closed many stores, but there are a few left.

After that, I would use O'Reily or Advance Auto online catalogs and look for the brand name parts (e.g. Moog suspension, Fel-Pro, Victor-Reinz, Champion, Dorman, Standard Motor Products [SMP], etc.]). Just looking around on the online catalogs you can get a sense of which are the good product lines that you've probably heard of (more expensive) and which are the cut-rate cheap products from commie China (again, avoid). Unfortunately Auto Zone carries a lot of crappy parts, so I would avoid them if possible. Be aware that a lot of the young guys working at these local stores (other than Carquest and NAPA) are not very knowlegable these days, so I'd do my own searching on their websites and take in a printout page of what you need. If you go into the store, try to find an older guy for help - but many have retired due to the Covid scare. The Carquest and NAPA guys are usually pretty good, but they will assume that you know what you are doing, and may be less helpful if they are busy (go in on a weekday).

As far as online, I've used Rockauto.com for years. Very easy to use website. They have parts from all the major aftermarket manufacturers (e.g. Moog, Fel-Pro, SMP, etc.) and group them by premium,"daily driver" (supposedly OEM quality), and economy (so you can get an idea of which manufacturers make the best parts.) Always best to get the premium or at least daily driver parts. As I wrote, the economy parts these days may come from commie China and may be junk - avoid them. They also have "manufacturer closeout" parts which are marked way down. For example, the Carquest parts from closed stores show up. I bought a bunch of Carquest branded premium Moog "problem solver" suspension parts for probably a quarter the regular cost (by the way, beware that Moog also has/had an imported lower-quality economy line). Rockauto ships from a few warehouses, so sometimes you wind up paying multiple shipping charges, but you can try to select different parts so they come from one warehouse (they are coded with a little icon to show you). Some of the car forums online also regularly post 5% off promo codes if you Google "rockauto" + "promo code." As I recall, you enter it into some oddball place on one of the checkout screens. After your first order, I think they will also e-mail you the 5% off promo code for next order (has expiration date.)

If you search on Rockauto and find the part number for a good quality part, you can also go to Amazon to check their price. Amazon has weirdo pricing policies, and sometimes marks parts way down. Amazon carries lots of auto parts, but I'd only buy directly from Amazon (shown in the list of vendors), not their "marketplace" sellers, since returning a wrong part to them will be a hassle. It is also worth checking the parts numbers sometime on the hot rod sites Summitracing.com or Jegs.com for certain parts like mufflers or cat converters.

The local Dodge/Chrysler dealer parts are obviously good quality but are sometimes very expensive. There are some Dodge/Chrysler dealers that run their own websites with better prices if you search on things like Mopar parts or Chrysler parts or Dodge Parts, but you have to know what you are doing on those sites to get the exact part number you need from the parts catalog diagrams on the sites. Unfortunately, it is also hard to know if these are reputable dealers, and most will not accept returns, except with a huge restocking fee. Obviously some Dodge/Chrysler dealers are decent and some are sleazy (you can check their actual dealer name & physical address for complaints on their state/local Better Business Bureau site and also see if they are a BBB member). I ordered before from a couple of these online dealers years ago. See this old thread for some info (but may be outdated now):

Unless you have one of the big OEM parts catalogs, the Rockauto site is easier to use than wading though the Mopar parts catalog (which can be a little confusing unless you understand their format). They used to have pdfs of the big Dodge parts catalogs and service manuals on the old version of this site dodgeintrepid.net, but I'm not sure where they are now on the site (see that old thread above). The parts catalog has diagrams of the parts and the Mopar part numbers. Obviouisly you need the right catalog for your year (they cover several years). You could search around the site or just ask a moderator. I have a hard copy of the Dodge parts catalog for my '94 (they are big and heavy in a 3-ring thick binder). They come on sale on ebay sometimes along with the service manuals. Once you have the parts catalog, you can also search on ebay with the exact part number since there are guys who bought up whole lots of Chrysler/Dodge parts when the Chrysler buyout cut back the number of local dealers years ago.

The whole premium/economy part thing is very annoying these days, but lots of manufacturers and parts stores are doing it due to the competition from Autozone cheapo parts. So just be aware of that and that you may see two parts for your application from the same manufacturer. The more expensive one will obviously usually be the premium part. And the made in USA or Europe or Taiwan or Japan part will almost always be better than those made in commie China (PRC) or other Asian countries. The China parts are really bad. Same deal obviously for tools (new USA-made tools are very expensive these days [check flea markets for used], but Japan and Taiwan make good tools.) Avoid Harbor Freight commie China tools - they can break and injure you; seen it happen.
Generally good info.

I would add that in recent years, I've come to trust parts by A.C. Delco in their "Professional" line. They also have their "Advantage" line, which are the economy grade. I've learned from experience to trust their Professional line.

You mentioned Dorman. They're got some parts that help with some problems, but their quality varies. For example:
• Their coolant reservoirs for our cars are made of low quality materials - only last a few months, pay more for OEM on that (eBay sometimes has good pricing on those).
• Their HVAC door actuators are crap right out of the box. People have posted that you can combine parts from a bad OEM actuator with a crap Dorman actuator and make a working actuator. Someone posted the details.
• Dorman cradle bushings for 2nd gen. LH cars are total crap, but they do come with new bolts. Buy the Dorman kit for the bolts, throw the bushings away, and get the bushings from Johnny.
• For 2.7 coolent outlet housings, get that from the dealer with the bleeder valve welded into the metal pipe - not molded into the plastic housing. The Dorman housing is the old OEM design with the bleeder valve molded into the housing, and the plastic is poor quality and will not last more than a few months.
 

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Just to add, the newer coolant housing Dorman 902-301HP is very good, I had mine for a bit less than 3 years, and not a single problem. I have had all the styles before, this is the one to install, about $50.00. All aluminum construction.
 

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Just to add, the newer coolant housing Dorman 902-301HP is very good, I had mine for a bit less than 3 years, and not a single problem. I have had all the styles before, this is the one to install, about $50.00. All aluminum construction.
That's the coolant outlet housing for the 2.7. That's how Chrysler should have done it - kudos to Dorman on that one!

Chrysler did later move the bleeder to the metal pipe, but their outlet housing (sans bleeder) remained plastic - which still eventually fails, but lasted a good bit longer than the Dorman plastic version (with bleeder). The all-metal Dorman housing can still be used if you've already converted to the later-design OEM pipe with bleeder - you'll just have 2 bleeders.

Thanks for posting that. Apparently they've had it out for a while, but nobody here knew about it - until now.

EDIT: I searched and found the all-metal part mentioned in two previous threads - both in early 2020:

Post no. 7 - Coolant Air Bleeder/ Oil Pan Gasket

Post no. 1 - Replacement coolant outlet flange
 
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