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Discussion Starter #1
I bought the IROTORS and pads. But I dont know how to change them. I didn't see a how to either. So if any of you can help me through this, cuz I don't want to spend $50 and an hour that I don't really have, it would be most appreciated.
TIA
 

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I installed my irotors and pads last may. It is really easy.
1. Jack up the car
2. Take off the tire.
3. there should be two long bolts that hold the caliper on the bracket. Take out those two bolts.
4. Slide the caliper off of the rotor.
5. There are a couple of lock rings that hold the rotor onto the hub. Break them off and the rotor should slide right off the hub.
6. Take the caliper and slide off the old brake pads and slide on the new ones.
7. Put the new rotors on and then slide the caliper back on and bolt it back up.

If you want to wait like a week, I can see about some time off, you could head down here and I could help you do them. PM me if you are interested.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
crash459 said:

5. There are a couple of lock rings that hold the rotor onto the hub. Break them off and the rotor should slide right off the hub.

7. Put the new rotors on and then slide the caliper back on and bolt it back up.

If you want to wait like a week, I can see about some time off, you could head down here and I could help you do them. PM me if you are interested.
I appreciate the offer but I dont think I can wait. When you say "break off" the lock rings. Do I reaaly break them. How would the rotor stay on? And when I put the caplier back on does it go in the same place or is there only one place for it to go?

guide rods=two long bolts? right?
oh yeah and what kind of grease would i need?
 

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chinocavalera said:
And when I put the caplier back on does it go in the same place or is there only one place for it to go?
the caliper sits inside a frame, you pretty much have to put it in the same way

Make sure you don't leave the caliper hanging off the brake line, make a hanger using a wire coat hanger to hold it up while changing the rotor
 

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chinocavalera said:
I appreciate the offer but I dont think I can wait. When you say "break off" the lock rings. Do I reaaly break them. How would the rotor stay on? And when I put the caplier back on does it go in the same place or is there only one place for it to go?

guide rods=two long bolts? right?
oh yeah and what kind of grease would i need?
Yes, break them. I broke mine off by prying them off with a screwdriver. The caliper and the rims will hold the rotors on.

I am going through the service manual to see if I can get you a picture of what it looks like. Hold on.....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Do any of you people know what the torque is for the lug nuts. I just bought a 10-250 lb/ft wrench for the job. I hope I bought the right wrench. There werer a few different wrenches like tq/in, and 50-250 tq/ft wrenches.
 

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If I remember correctly, 90 - 110 lbs. depending on whether or not you have alluminum wheels.

Hopefully someone else will be able to verify, I'm going from memory.
 

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I know the're not the best but a Haynes or Chilton manual will walk you through a brake job and many other common maintenance items. Just my $0.02.:rolleyes:

FredB:bigsmile:
 

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Warlord187 said:
... Also, lube everywhere the brake pad comes in contact with the caliper! Well, don't lube the friction surface. :)
Hopefully, the friction surface won't be in contact with the caliper! :biggrin:

Shop manual calls out 100 ft-lbs for Al & steel wheels. Use thread-lock if you've got some - my mechanic swears by it, even for lug nuts.
 

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Use thread-lock if you've got some - my mechanic swears by it, even for lug nuts.
Do you know why? I know it makes the connection stronger, but does it also prevent corrosion & rust? Does it get harder after time?
 

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Ed1534 said:
Do you know why? I know it makes the connection stronger, but does it also prevent corrosion & rust? Does it get harder after time?
The stuff he uses on the lug nuts looks a lot like some kind of white (lithium) grease compound. I've used lithium grease on my lug nuts for years. I'm sure it wears out eventually but if you rotate the tires, you're renewing it every 6 months ...
 

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D76G12 said:
Hopefully, the friction surface won't be in contact with the caliper! :biggrin:

Shop manual calls out 100 ft-lbs for Al & steel wheels. Use thread-lock if you've got some - my mechanic swears by it, even for lug nuts.
I'd NEVER use thread-lock on my lug nuts. If anything, I'd lube the surface where it comes in contact with the wheel! If all the lugnuts are torqued to 90ft/lbs and then re-torqued again 25-50miles later, then you'll never have to worry about the lugnuts coming off!

Even pressure between all 5 lug nuts is exactly what you need.

Hardwarz
 

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hardwarz said:
I'd NEVER use thread-lock on my lug nuts. If anything, I'd lube the surface where it comes in contact with the wheel! If all the lugnuts are torqued to 90ft/lbs and then re-torqued again 25-50miles later, then you'll never have to worry about the lugnuts coming off!

Even pressure between all 5 lug nuts is exactly what you need.

Hardwarz
I agree with lubing the contact surface, too. But if my wife has a flat out in BFE, I want to be sure she can change it ...
 

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be carefull retracting the brake caliper piston, make sure you give 1/2 hour of time between the last application of the brake pedal and you attempt and pushing the caliper piston in. Use a slow and steady motion on the c-clamp to get the piston all the way back.

It doesn't really matter what you use to 'lubricate' the bolt that hold the calipers in place, I use anti-seize compound. I also use anti-seize compound on the wheel studs and on the back side of the brake rotor hub interface, and the front side of the rotor wheel interface.

also lightly torque the lugs when you are putting the wheels back on, and full torque them when the wheel/studs are hot.
 
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