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I need info on how to change the idle pulley ...first time doing it.. soo i need tips mates...

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Loosen number 4 and do not take off bolt, since it is an adjusting bolt. Remove number 2 and wiggle pulley off. Install in reverse. FSM says to tighten number 2, relating to the AC idler, to 250 in lbs, so I assume it would be the same for the PS idler I can't imagine it would be any different from a 3.x engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Tank you m8 ..... how do i know how much tight should the bolts be ...

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You will need a torque wrench, which you can rent from an auto parts store, and set it to 250in/lb. I'm sure a snug tighten, but not arm-wrenching, would be fine. My torque wrench only goes to 215in/lb, so I used a little Loctite on the pulley nut and it hasn't loosened.
 

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Be sure to loosen the center nut (number 2 in that picture) a bit before loosening the belt tension bolt. Leaving that nut tight locks the pulley in place so loosening the tension bolt doesn't do anything.
 

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What Joe said, plus, just so there's no misunderstanding - the tensioning bolt (jack bolt) does *not* get torqued - only the bolt that locks in the adjustment (in that sketch, no. 2). (Sorry if that sounds obvious, but I have learned not to assume what people do and do not understand.)

And - yes - the locking bolt torque spec. is the same for all belt adjustment locking bolts on 2.7 and 3.2/3.5.

Also - on the 2.7 a.c. belt tensioner, there is no tensioning bolt - only a locking bolt. There is a spring built into the tensioner bracket that tensions the belt - you lock in that tension with the locking bolt once the belt is on. You also have to remove the tensioner before putting the new belt on and put the end of the spring into the correct slot of the tensioner bracket depending on if the belt is new or pre-used. (See FSM for details and sketch.)

On all but the 2.7 a.c. belt, you tension for 1/4 to 3/8" of belt deflection at center span when pushed with moderate force with the thumb.
 

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What Joe said, plus, just so there's no misunderstanding - the tensioning bolt (jack bolt) does *not* get torqued - only the bolt that locks in the adjustment (in that sketch, no. 2). (Sorry if that sounds obvious, but I have learned not to assume what people do and do not understand.)
Yeah, my bad. I corrected my post.

Also - on the 2.7 a.c. belt tensioner, there is no tensioning bolt - only a locking bolt. There is a spring built into the tensioner bracket that tensions the belt - you lock in that tension with the locking bolt once the belt is on. You also have to remove the tensioner before putting the new belt on and put the end of the spring into the correct slot of the tensioner bracket depending on if the belt is new or pre-used. (See FSM for details and sketch.)
Just adding the pic.

On all but the 2.7 a.c. belt, you tension for 1/4 to 3/8" of belt deflection at center span when pushed with moderate force with the thumb.
How would you check this if you do not have the, ugh, special tool?
 

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...On all but the 2.7 a.c. belt, you tension for 1/4 to 3/8" of belt deflection at center span when pushed with moderate force with the thumb.
...How would you check this if you do not have the, ugh, special tool?
Calibrated eyeballs, or use a ruler if you must if your eyeballs aren't calibrated. :)

Some people use another method: Twist the belt - I think it's something like you shouldn't be able to twist it more than 90°, but I'm not sure.
 
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