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Yes Chase; very good reading indeed. Though I must say I have never heard of Bendix. ;) :p
Our aircraft believe it or not have used Bendix brakes in the past, though I'm not sure if they still do or not.
 

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Thanks Warlord187 very good info.
 

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Great post. Enjoyed reading it.
Makes me wonder how hot my rotors were after my trip to Gettysburg. Lots of steep mountainous roads, and sharp turns.
 

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BENDIX is a Major Brand USED in the Western half of the USA

i use them on my car in AZ sold in CA TX and CO and in WA, NV

so they are great brand to use. not once have i had any breaking problems using them on any of my familys cars.

they rock for breaks! :)

Jim
 

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Warlord187 said:


Man, if that were true, you be stomping on dem brakes at ultra high speed!!! :D
Well, I don't know about your slow R/T but my Intrepid routinely reaches Mach 1, 2 and 3. I have no chutes so I need to use friction braking. I figure my rotors should be ceramic from now on to take the heat.

Anyway, good info. Now, all we need is a nice big brake kit from an aftermarket supplier (hint) that decreases braking distances and has a longer life span without costing $4000.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
FunkRider said:
I've been wondering if I can use R/T rotors in my first gen?
Stock R/T rotors aren't the best thing. I have aftermarket rotors made by UBP which are OEM replacements, but they are OEM replacements for the ES. These rotors have so far preformed better than my stock R/T ones.

I guess UBP knows how to make some good casts. :)

I don't see why you couldn't use R/T rotors. If the bolt pattern and the size are the same, you should be able to. I know the diamter is 297mm. Not sure on the bolt pattern.
 

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When brake temperatures get too high, the pads and rotors are no longer able to absorb any more heat and lose their ability to create any additional friction. As the driver presses harder and harder on the brake pedal, he feels less and less response from his overheated brakes. Eventually, he loses his brakes altogether.

I don't know where they got this info. When the brakes get hot they produce more gas from the friction material being burned up. As the temperature increases more gas is produced. This gas builds up between the pad and the rotor and causes brake fade. That is the reason for drilled and sloted rotors. The holes or slots allow the gas to escape and provide better braking. Heat does not stop the friction. It is the gas produced insulating the friction material.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
adaptabl said:



I don't know where they got this info. When the brakes get hot they produce more gas from the friction material being burned up. As the temperature increases more gas is produced. This gas builds up between the pad and the rotor and causes brake fade. That is the reason for drilled and sloted rotors. The holes or slots allow the gas to escape and provide better braking. Heat does not stop the friction. It is the gas produced insulating the friction material.
True. That is brake fade. However, the rotors can only take so much heat. It just was an oversite on the editors part to include brake pads.
 
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