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Well, I haven't make the page match the rest of the site yet, but I decided to throw up the instructions ASAP so you can all get to see them :)

Thanks again to GR8WHT for making these available.

http://www.dodgeintrepid.net/lintake/lintake.html

If you have any questions or problems, the best way to get an answer would probably be to post them here on the board where all the experts here can give you a hand :)
 

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Thank you Intrepid98 and GR8WHT!! I'm wondering, how important is it to use aluminum? Is it because it doesn't corrode like steel?
 

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Originally posted by Bart:
Thank you Intrepid98 and GR8WHT!! I'm wondering, how important is it to use aluminum? Is it because it doesn't corrode like steel?
It's lighter too!! :)

And correct me if I'm wrong (my metallugy is a little rusty) but aluminum is a poorer conductor of heat than steel.

My question is this. Could you forget the aluminum and just use some type of plastic instead (like PVC)?
 

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I was just wondering if there was some other type of rubber that I can find at the hardware store.
 

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One last thing...are all these sizes also correct for the 2.7? Or are there alternate instructions/parts?

Once again thanks for posting this info. :)
 

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Originally posted by Warlord187:
It's lighter too!! :)

And correct me if I'm wrong (my metallugy is a little rusty) but aluminum is a poorer conductor of heat than steel.

My question is this. Could you forget the aluminum and just use some type of plastic instead (like PVC)?
Aluminum is in fact much better conductor of heat and electricity than steel!
 

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PVC distorts over time (my early intakes were just pvc) and cannot handle the day to day stresses in the engine compartment. It does work very well as an insulator of the aluminum and is unstressed so it does not distort.

The rubber parts from a hardware store are not designed for the excessive underhood temps. Thus the Nitrile Rubber. (silicone is also avalible, but cost 3X as much)

For the 2.7, delete the 1" pvc piece and slide the 45 and 90 degree elbows together. Also shorten the 8" PVC piece to 6.5" and your all set! You will need a piece of 1/2 heater hose to reach the breather. (local auto parts store)

Hope this clear a bit up.
 

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So where can I buy these Nitrile rubber fittings? Do I have to buy them online? are there other companies that make it? Does a car parts place stock it? thanks.
 

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That is a really professional looking design Gr8wht. Thanks for posting that for the rest of us. Your design gives me a lot of ideas. How are you running it into your car. I am trying to design a cold or ram air system into my car. My biggest problem is seperating water from air(for those especially rainy days). Since I don't have a second Gen I'm not exactl sure who your engine compartments are setup. Do you have any pics of this system in your car?

Buschman
 

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Originally posted by Warlord187:
I'm assuming that the 3" dia is the outside dia. Also, how can something 3" in dia slide over something else that is 3" in dia?
I'm not sure about the aluminum pipe pieces and the rubber fittings in this case but it could be some help that in plumbing the NOMINAL size (1", 2" ... etc.) usually refers to the inside diameter of a pipe. It is NOMINAL because it is almost never exact.
Extra Heavy pipes have more wall thickness than their same size standard versions but the outside diameter is the same and the inside is smaller. Rubber connecting couplings or fittings are sized to fit over the outside of the pipe. All this will make the actaul inside diameter of a NOMINAL SIZE 3" rubber fitting about 3.5" or more.
I hope this was clear! :D
 

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I have access to either stainless steel or aluminum pipe (sch. 10 or sch. 40). I'm assuming the sch. 10 would be the best choice because of the thinner wall, but I was wandering if there is an advantage to having the intake welded instead of clamping it together? This would include the 90 deg. and 45 deg. elbows. Anyone have any thoughts to this?

Brian
 

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Originally posted by bigdaddy:
I have access to either stainless steel or aluminum pipe (sch. 10 or sch. 40). I'm assuming the sch. 10 would be the best choice because of the thinner wall, but I was wandering if there is an advantage to having the intake welded instead of clamping it together? This would include the 90 deg. and 45 deg. elbows. Anyone have any thoughts to this?

Brian
Welding stainless steel and/or aluminum is very troublesome. I assume the equipment needed to perform either task would be available only in some serious pro-shops and that could make the cost too high.
I've been thinking using hard temperred "M" or "L" copper tubing with either soft soldered or brazed fittings. Copper fittings are very smooth inside. The 45 deg. angle could even be bent for an even better result in air flow. If we could bend the 90 deg. angle, that would be even better but the 3" "M" copper probably couldn't withstand that much bending! Maybe your stainless steel or aluminum could take all that bending without streching to their breakpoint.
 
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