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I've always wondered why the tie-rods are connected to the top of the struts and not the bottom, like most designs. Any info reguarding this?

A few mechanics have mentioned to me that it is a very bad design and was corrected with the new LX models. And after looking at the new 300s, it's almost identical design to a new BMW 5 series.
 

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the LH is not alone in this,, honda uses this on the newer civics,, and cr-v's, some older GM cars also used it,, to this day, many renault's use it
 

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At the time of its design, about 1990, the LH steering geometry was lifted from the Audi 100, a similarly sized auto with a longitudinally mounted engine.

A benefit of a longitudinally mounted engine is a tighter turning circle and less torque steer than a transverse mount.

One trade off is that the steering rack is above the engine which makes it absorb heat from the hot engine so it deteriorates more quickly than it would if mounted beneath the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the LH is not alone in this,, honda uses this on the newer civics,, and cr-v's, some older GM cars also used it,, to this day, many renault's use it
I've read that it is a based on a Renault design. But I can't wait to say good riddence when I get a Charger / Challenger in a few years, that's based on a S-class front design, E-class rear 5 link design. Just get me to 240,000 miles LH 93 ES Intrepid.. hold on tranny!!
 

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Back in the early 90's, Chrysler had huge plans for Intrepid and LH design, to compete with the foreign auto market. They tried to isolate the suspension by putting the engine front ways rather than transverse. Tension struts connected to Control arms, it was pretty much a isolated suspension cradle that went well for a few years but then started to see problems with the bolts in the rack but still made them each year. Its not a bad idea at all, just sometimes a ***** to work on lol.
 

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As old as these cars are. I'd say that the design held up pretty well. I think I wouldn't want anything designed by Damiler. Their not winning any reliability awards in any of their cars or any Chrysler cars that they have designed.
 

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As old as these cars are. I'd say that the design held up pretty well. I think I wouldn't want anything designed by Damiler. Their not winning a reliability awards in any of their cars or any Chrysler cars that they have designed.
this is true,, i wish i has a dime for every inner and outter tie rod ive replaced on chargers, and the newer 300'S
 

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Mechanics are like every other profession..... there are good ones and there are bad ones. Really bad ones. When I first got my Intrepid, I heard a mecahnic say that the LH's go though tie rods every 30k or so. Well, in 110k, my Intrepid went through just one. And that was around 90k. The LX's actually have much more problems with tie rods. I have 81k on my Magnum now and I think so far I've had 3 replaced so far. And yes, the LX chassis is part of an older Mercedes E class suspension. My transmission is also the 5 speed Mercedes design as is the stalk mounted (which I hate) cruise control. I believe the front suspensions on the LH's were derived from a Renault designed suspension on the Eagle Premier/Dodge monaco.
 

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the problem that i think is to use two individual bolts to hold each inner tie rod.

looking into the crv, it is a single bar at the center with radial connection with each inner tie rod.

it can be jam nut or sleeve or even factory pinched like the one on the 2nd gen.

the bar itself join with steering rack with single bar joint or something similar.

if there is any play, it would only appear at the single ball joint at the center or any or both at the outer tie rod end.

the tie rod end play is always there and no different to others design but the single center bar joint play only off center the steering wheel.

the benefit of this structure is virtually eliminate the play at lateral direction from the center joint. so the toe in/out would be affected.

once the toe was changed, the counter measure is to steer a little bit and this will apply a constant pressure on the inner tie rod bushing for the structure like LH. then sooner or later, the good bushing will be worn out.
 

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I just replaced the outer tie rods and inner tie rod bushings on my '01 Intrepid,basically because I was doing the struts and I figured it was time do everything. This was 2 weeks ago. Based on what I saw, I probably could have left the original tie rods in; they still seemed tight. Even the inner bushings weren't bad. And this was all original factory stuff. This car will turn over to 260K miles tomorrow.

I don't know about other model years but my observation is that Chrysler was using some darn good quality parts in 2001 (my car was built in August 2009).
 

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I don't know about other model years but my observation is that Chrysler was using some darn good quality parts in 2001 (my car was built in August 2009).
build in 2009? must be 1999?
 

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Index... you mean after adjusting, the outer tie rod end stud should be 90 degrees to the inner tie rod bolt?
No, not the outer tie rod end stud. (You don't have any choice about the stud.)

It's the outer tie rod end that rotates on the stud that needs to have rotational freeplay as you look down the tie rod. This way, as the suspension goes through its range of motion, it doesn't bind.
 

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No, not the outer tie rod end stud. (You don't have any choice about the stud.)

It's the outer tie rod end that rotates on the stud that needs to have rotational freeplay as you look down the tie rod. This way, as the suspension goes through its range of motion, it doesn't bind.
I think we mean the same thing... if the outer tie rod is cocked full counter clockwise (for sake of discussion), it can't turn any farther and will bind when cycled... but if it is not rotated all the way to one side, it will be able to flex both clockwise, and counter clockwise with out binding.

Right?
 

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I think we mean the same thing... if the outer tie rod is cocked full counter clockwise (for sake of discussion), it can't turn any farther and will bind when cycled... but if it is not rotated all the way to one side, it will be able to flex both clockwise, and counter clockwise with out binding.

Right?
Right. I usually move it full clockwise, then full counterclockwise and tighten it down midway between the two.
 
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