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Discussion Starter #1
Got a question....

Let's just say you accidentally have a copy of a certain OS made a rich billionaire with the initials B.G. You have this "copy" on your computer. Would you use update utility available over the internet through this rich guy's website?

I hear they scan your computer for EULA's and the such. (even though that is a against the Privacy Act, which is a federal law)

Not that I have anything like this of course.....just curious.

[ October 07, 2001: Message edited by: Intrepidatious ]
 

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If you have any fears, just get a program called Xteq X-Setup. It will tell your so called operating system that you have already registered, any update websites you might visit will ask your computer no questions after that. Plus you can tweak to high hell.
 

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Well, the thing with BG's OS is that is scans your system when you go to the website to see what updates you already have. (so it knows which one's you need..etc...etc) So I guess it needs to see that, but also at the same time, how much more info is it taking?
 

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There has to be some unwritten law regarding HOW MUCH they can legally poke around in your computer. If windowsupdate says they are checking your computer for updates... thats ALL it should do. It shouldn't do more than what its saying, that should be against the law.

The way I see it, if they want to probe around my PC.... might as well show me a search warrant. ;O)
 

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Regardless of what information that may or may not be collected during the various communications that take place between a computer and Microsoft's website, at this time, there is no legal action they can take.

With the XP (and .NET most likely) line of products things are changed. Microsoft has a new product activation scheme in the OS (as well as other XP products like Office) that will disable the software if it is not licensed correctly within 30 days. It also contains code that will disable the product if it detects that it was put onto a different PC.

For more information check this article for an overview.

Microsoft has released a version of these products for business consumption that disables the product activation scheme, but you must purchase it via MOLP.

And yes, if you swap a significant amount of hardware around or even change drives around so your drive letters change, the chance exists that you will have to reactivate the product. :mad:

Ah well. It's their product - they can do what they want with it. As my software is legit I have no real beef with it other than the added annoyance of having to reactivate (five minutes or so).
 
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