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Well, on one hand, "THANKS!!!" that was a great idea.
On the other hand tho. You a$$ musta been pretty bored last night.:D
 

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yippee ki yay
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Discussion Starter #6
What a great idea! Thanks for sharing your info! Kudo's for you! +++rep!
:woot:

Well, on one hand, "THANKS!!!" that was a great idea.
On the other hand tho. You a$$ musta been pretty bored last night.:D
uhhh....multi tasking last nite....PITA but it had to be done

Very cool RJ now all i need is ah 2.7 lol.
lol...i've got a 2.7 block sitting at the shop with your name on it....
You make nice videos.
:D
 

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On your first video (2.7 water pump), there is another design that uses an even thinner gasket. The difference in thickness you measured in your video is small - about 0.005". Could simply be manufacturing tolerance variation without any difference in the pump body thickness. As you've seen in my posts (with photos) on a later design, there is a newer style of gasket that is *much* thinner than what you show - maybe 1/32" thick (I didn't measure it, but I did get 0.062" thick on my original factory gasket), and the pump body is thicker to make up the difference (the timing cover bolts to the pump body as well as the engine block, so the surfaces that mate with the timing cover have to be at the same level). The new style gasket looks totally different - all metal, no rubber, and coated with some hard orange coating. IMO, a much better gasket design, as the molded rubber on the old-style gasket eventually turns to complete mush.

Of course, there is also the *new design* aspect of the sprocket for the post-'04 timing chain that we have discussed in the past (our cars can be converted over with new-design crank and cam sprockets and pump), but what we're talking about here is just the gasket and pump body. I think we've determined that you can get the new design, meaning thinner gasket (the one like I was talking about with the orange overcoat/no rubber molding) and thicker pump body with sprockets for either pitch chain. My guess is that by now, most or all manufacturers of the 2.7 pumps are using the thin, orange, no-rubber gasket/thick pump body design with choice of sprocket to go with either type chain?
 

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That was very useful thanks, I still have the same question as I did in a previous post, whats the cost of rebuilding the 2.7 with all the parts you did in your rebuild?
 

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yippee ki yay
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Discussion Starter #10
My guess is that by now, most or all manufacturers of the 2.7 pumps are using the thin, orange, no-rubber gasket/thick pump body design with choice of sprocket to go with either type chain?
i would probably say about 60% of them are suppling the no-rubber gasket i'm still finding a good percentage are still suppling the cheaper rubberized one.

I just remove a waterpump the other day that confirmed my theory.....the pump was still in operational condition and still had more life IMO to go but what did fail in this case was the rubberized gasket.

When comparing the Nissan VQ35 engine in design to the 2.7 they share alot of the same characteristics

VQ35



2.7 design


the VQ35 engine has a slightly different position for the waterpump with slight tension to the pump like the weight of a guide on a 2.7 where as the waterpump in a 2.7 takes a larger portion of the weight of the engine on that pump. Chrysler has come along way in improving the design of the pump with better seals but not until recent has the design to the gasket improved to the quality it should have been years past. In IMO if chrysler would have incorporated the technology they have in the 2.7 today and applied it to the 1st 2.7's introduced in 98......todays conversation would probably be different.....there is only so much a computerized designed engine can be the rest has to rely on the human touch...ie the 350 engine designed before the age of computer but still in production today......technology has refined the engine over the years but the fondamental design and function of it is unchanged for the better most of 50 years. IMO we have lost our ablity to use the creativity of the mind and rely on computers to develop the creativity of the human mind and when it fails we blame that failure on poor maintainace as the cause.

What will be interesting is to see is the survivability and reliability of the pentastar engine which incorporates both new and old technology and shares simalar disigns to the 2.7 motor but with 2 independant primary chains and the deletion of the cam chains built on the 3.3 design of the block......have the mistakes been learned or have they created a whole new set of problems that have not been realized yet.
 

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yippee ki yay
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Discussion Starter #11
That was very useful thanks, I still have the same question as I did in a previous post, whats the cost of rebuilding the 2.7 with all the parts you did in your rebuild?
here is a approximate break down of what i spend.....

timing kit including primary tensioner.....$139.00
waterpump..........................................$ 50.00
complete gasket kit..............................$ 90.00
head bolts........................................... $ 20.00

or

complete master rebuild kit including new pistons and ring set....lash adjusters..and other stuff...$587.00

hot tanking heads.....$ 15.00 / piece
planing heads...........$ 30.00 / piece
 

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Thanks

Thats actually not bad at all. I take it you just buzzed the cylinders a bit and didn't have to have any adtional machine work done?
 

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yippee ki yay
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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks

Thats actually not bad at all. I take it you just buzzed the cylinders a bit and didn't have to have any adtional machine work done?
in most case i do....it just really depends on the condition of the over motor and how far im rebuilding it
 

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Question about a engine swap

I have a 2000 dodge interpid with the 2.7 engine and i wanted to upgrade to the 3.5 high output from a 2001 chrysler concorde my question is will it be an even swap or will i have to do modification?
 

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I have a 2000 dodge interpid with the 2.7 engine and i wanted to upgrade to the 3.5 high output from a 2001 chrysler concorde my question is will it be an even swap or will i have to do modification?
please post a new thread, or do some searching. Welcome to the site! Simple answer is yes. Pretty much plug and play.
 

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Discussion Starter #18


TIMING CHAIN

1. Inspect all sprockets (4),(9),(11) and chain guides (2),(5),(10). Replace if worn.
2. For crankshaft sprocket installation procedures (Refer to 09 - Engine/Engine Block/CRANKSHAFT - Installation) .
3. If removed, install the right and left side short chain guides (10). Tighten attaching bolts to 28 N·m (250 in. lbs.).
4. Align the crankshaft sprocket timing mark to the mark on the oil pump housing (3).

NOTE: Lubricate timing chain and guides with engine oil before installation.
5. Place the left side primary chain sprocket onto the chain so that the timing mark is located in between the two (plated) timing links (1).
6. Lower the primary chain with the left side sprocket through the left cylinder head opening.

NOTE: The camshaft sprockets can be allowed to float on the camshaft hub during installation.
7. Loosely position the left side camshaft sprocket over the camshaft hub.
8. Align the timing (plated) link to the crankshaft sprocket timing mark (3).
9. Position the primary chain onto the water pump drive sprocket (11).
10. Align the right camshaft sprocket timing mark to the timing (plated) link on the timing chain (8) and loosely position over the camshaft hub.
11. Verify that all chain timing (plated) links are properly aligned to the timing marks on all sprockets.
12. Install the left side lower chain guide (2) and tensioner arm (5). Tighten attaching bolts to 28 N·m (250 in. lbs.).

NOTE: Inspect the O-ring on the chain guide access plugs before installing. Replace the O-ring as necessary.
13. Install the chain guide access plugs to the cylinder heads. Tighten plugs to 20 N·m (15 ft. lbs.).

NOTE: To reset the primary timing chain tensioner, engine oil will first need to be purged from the tensioner.
14. Purge oil from the timing chain tensioner using the following procedure: a. Place the check ball (2) end of the tensioner into the shallow end of Chain Tensioner Gauge 8186 (3).
b. Using hand pressure, slowly depress the tensioner until oil is purged from the tensioner.
15. Reset the timing chain tensioner using the following procedure: a. Position the cylinder plunger (4) into the deeper end of Chain Tensioner Gauge 8186 (3).
b. Apply a downward force until tensioner is reset .

NOTE: If oil was not first purged from the tensioner, use slight finger pressure to assist the center arm pin of Chain Tensioner Gauge 8186 to unseat the tensioner's check ball.

CAUTION: Ensure the tensioner is properly reset. The tensioner body (4) must bottom against the top edge of Chain Tensioner Gauge 8186 (3). Failure to properly perform the resetting procedure may cause tensioner jamming.

NOTE: Inspect the tensioner O-ring (2) for nicks or cuts and make sure the snap ring (1) is correctly installed, replace as necessary.

16. Install the reset chain tensioner (1) into the right cylinder head.
17. Position tensioner retaining plate (2) and tighten bolts (3) to 12 N·m (105 in. lbs.).
18. Starting at the right cylinder bank, first position the camshaft damper (1) (if equipped) on the camshaft hub, then insert a 3/8” square drive extension with a breaker bar into the intake camshaft drive hub. Rotate the camshaft until the camshaft hub aligns to the camshaft sprocket and damper attaching holes. Install the sprocket attaching bolts and tighten to 28 N·m (250 in. lbs.).
19. Insert a 3/8” square drive extension with a breaker bar into the intake camshaft drive hub and rotate the camshaft until the sprocket attaching bolts can be installed. Tighten the sprocket bolts to 28 N·m (250 in. lbs.).
20. Rotate the crankshaft slightly clockwise to remove timing chain slack, if necessary.
21. Activate the timing chain tensioner by using a flat bladed pry tool to gently pry tensioner arm towards the tensioner slightly. Then release the tensioner arm. Verify the tensioner is activated (extends).
22. Install the camshaft position sensor (2) and connect the electrical connector.
23. Install the timing chain cover, crankshaft vibration damper and accessory drive belt (Refer to 09 - Engine/Valve Timing/COVER(S) , Engine Timing - Installation).
24. Install the cylinder head covers (Refer to 09 - Engine/Cylinder Head/COVER(S) , Cylinder Head - Installation)
25. Install the upper intake manifold and air cleaner housing assembly (Refer to 09 - Engine/Manifolds/MANIFOLD, Intake - Installation)
26. Connect the negative battery cable and tighten nut to 5 N·m (45 in. lbs.).
27. Fill the cooling system (Refer to 07 - Cooling - Standard Procedure) .

NOTE: After installation of a reset tensioner, engine noise will occur after initial start-up. This noise will normally disappear within 5–10 seconds.
28. Operate the engine until it reaches normal operating temperature. Check cooling system for correct fluid level (Refer to 07 - Cooling - Standard Procedure)

NOTE: The Cam/Crank Variation Relearn procedure must be performed anytime there has been a repair/replacement made to a powertrain system, for example: flywheel, valvetrain, camshaft and/or crankshaft sensors or components (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure)
 
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