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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
THis is for a ford contour (98) I4.

I imagine its similar i just want to find out if its similar or something else that could be causing this error.

I was driving today and i heard a ping noise and then when i stopped at a light and the check engine light came on. code P0340 (position sensor circuit malfunction") The engine seemed to kick as a misfire. Checked the plugs, all the wiring and i cant figure it out.

The car also started varying its RPM and the engine died. It seems to idle ok in N but dies in D. The tensioner is also flexing a lot. Its stable above 1000rpm but very variable below that.

Im not sure whats going on. Could this be a limp mode??? When the car gets going it runs just like before, constat speeds and RPM at any speed.

Please let me know. Im getting a position sensor replaced but i fear it may be others as well.

Any advice in general would be very helpful in terms of the symptoms of a faulty sensor. The car has 105,000km and its had its maintenance up to date.. timing belt....etc.
 

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Yep, that code is a bad Cam Sensor. Here's everything I got on it:

Camshaft Position Sensor
Ford Contour/Mystique/Cougar 1995-1999

OPERATION

The camshaft position sensor (CMP) is a variable reluctance sensor that is triggered by a high point on the left-hand exhaust camshaft on the 2.5L engine and a high spot on the intake camshaft on the 2.0L engine. The CMP sends a signal relating camshaft position back to the PCM which is used by the PCM to control engine timing.



TESTING

Check voltage between the camshaft position sensor terminals PWR GND and CID.

With engine running, voltage should be greater than 0.1 volt AC and vary with engine speed.

If voltage is not within specification, check for proper voltage at the VPWR terminal.

If VPWR voltage is greater than 10.5 volts, sensor may be faulty.



REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 1 and 2


Fig. 1: The CMP sensor location-2.0L engine




Fig. 2: The CMP sensor mounting-2.5L engine



Disconnect the negative battery cable.

On 2.0L engines, remove the air intake resonator.

Unplug the connector from the CMP sensor.

Remove the retaining bolt and remove the CMP sensor.

To install:

Ensure the CMP sensor's mounting surface is clean, and the sensor's O-ring is in place.

Install the CMP sensor and tighten the retaining bolt to 13-17 ft. lbs. (18-23 Nm) on the 2.0L engine, and 71-106 inch lbs. (8-12 Nm) on the 2.5L engine.

Plug the CMP connector in.

On 2.0L engines, install the air intake resonator.

Connect the negative battery cable.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I thought it was in the front. Mine has a small plug too. odd... this is what the sensor looks like on the front. I dont have it in the back of the motor. The mounting position looks identical but on the exhaust side. Its a vct (variable cam timing) so they may have made it diff. The top of the motor looks different too so i dunno.

I fired up the car, ran perfect, then when it warmed up, it started acting up again. Has to be this sensor.

Strongt,

do you know the symptoms of a bad sensor?? i dunno if this is the main prob. My ford dealer said it may be others but definetly not mechanical. Something electrical. I hit the plug of the sensor a week ago chaning the thermostat but it just went all crazy today.

Thank you for your help. I think i found the right sensor, im gonna make sure when i get the new one. The sensor i found plugs into the block in the front of the engine beside the cam shafts. I dunno about the intake resonator?? is that the heat shield?? i just have a heat shield from the exhaust manifold that may be it.

Thanks once again, let me know about the symptoms so im sure. Sensor is no biggie 32$. I just hope it fixes it, the little car is very reliable against all other complaints, its my moms so she hardly uses it.

Ciprian
 

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The top pic shows the location of the sensor. Sorry I don't know about the resonator, I've never seen the engine bay of the Contour. As for the symptoms, I think that it is the Cam Sensor, because of the Code that the PCM has recorded, and also because the Cam Sensor sends a signal relating camshaft position back to the PCM which is used by the PCM to control engine timing as stated above.

Also as a side note, if you have a voltmeter I would test the Coil Pack just to be on the safe side too. ( Because you never know!!) Here's how:

2.0L Engine

See Figure 1


Fig. 1: 2.0L engine coil pack pin location and coil towers



PRIMARY WINDING RESISTANCE

See Figure 2


Fig. 2: Testing coil primary winding resistance



Turn the ignition OFF.

Disconnect the negative battery cable.

Remove the air intake resonators.

Disconnect the wiring harness from the ignition coil.

Check for dirt, corrosion or damage on the terminals and repair as necessary.

Measure coil primary resistance between the center ignition coil pin (B+) and pins 1 (coil 1) and 3 (coil 2).

Resistance should be 0.3-1.0 ohms. If resistance is out of specifications, replace the coil pack. If resistance is within specifications, proceed to secondary windings testing.

SECONDARY WINDING RESISTANCE

See Figures 3 and 4


Fig. 3: Testing coil secondary resistance of coil 1-2.0L engine




Fig. 4: Testing coil secondary resistance of coil 2-2.0L engine



Measure coil secondary resistance between the corresponding spark plug wire towers on the coil.

Coil 1-cylinders 1 and 4

Coil 2-cylinders 2 and 3

Resistance should be 12.8-13.1 kilohms. If secondary resistance is not within specification, replace the coil pack.


But like I said, I still think it's the Cam Sensor. But I just trying to think, and show you other things to look at also. I hope this helps you out some.
 

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Opps, I forgot to tell you that if the PCM can't tell what the Cam position is, it could cause a misfire condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Strongt said:
Opps, I forgot to tell you that if the PCM can't tell what the Cam position is, it could cause a misfire condition.
ya it feels like a misfire. The cam shaft sensor only works at idle right??? BEcause the car runs perfectly above idle speed, even at 1000 rpm vs 750rpm.

Ill check the coil when i install the sensor. I checked the plugs and they are in good shape, no oil leaks.

I hope its this senor. I think they changed the sensor since its the same as the v6 sensor after 98 to eliminate a separate one. Ill find out when i get 1 tomorrow.

Strongt, do you know what would cause this sensor to go bad??? just age ?

The car usually runs at high revs like 4000rpm or so. I had the window open today and I heard a tick noise from the engine, i think the tensioner spring snapped or something since it looks very weak.

Ill get a new tensioner tomorrow as well then ill c.

Thanks again for your help. BTW where do u get these diagrams?? They are great, almost the same, prob of the 96 contour since the engine isnt vct.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
changed the plugs.... tested the coils... all work fine

replaced the cam sensor and it still does it.

Its not as bad, by not as bad i mean the engine does not die. But it still acts funny and doesnt idle like it used to.

Any more ideas??

Could a tune up be the answer?? i mean after replacing the cam shaft sensor? maybe it needs to be realigned with the solenoid?? i dunno.

PLease let me know.

Thanks
 

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Man, that sucks that it's still not running good. Well there is two other thing that I would look at next. And they are nice and easy to do. All you need is a can of Intake cleaner. First is the IAC, if it's dirty, that will effect the how she idle's. And second, is the Mass Air Flow Sensor, take them out and spray some clean in them to clean and dirt off of them. A dirty Mass Air Flow Sensor will also make the engine run bad too. One the Mass Air Flow Sensor,, on Fig 1 on the pic below, make sure the wire's in the little hole are clean, they are the one's that send the info to the PCM. Here some info on how to get them off:

Mass Air Flow Sensor


Fig. 1: The exposed "hot wire" of the MAF sensor

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 5 through 9


Fig. 5: Loosen the hose clamp and ...




Fig. 6: ... slide the outlet hose off of the MAF sensor




Fig. 7: Unsnap the retaining clips and ...




Fig. 8: ... and remove the MAF sensor from the air cleaner cover




Fig. 9: Inspect the O-ring on the MAF sensor and replace if necessary



Disconnect the negative battery cable.

Unplug the MAF and IAT sensors connectors.

Release the retaining clips from the air cleaner cover.

Remove the air cleaner outlet tube from the throttle body(2.5L) or resonator (2.0L)and remove the outlet tube and air cleaner cover assembly.

Loosen the hose clamps and remove the outlet tube from the MAF sensor.

Remove the MAF retaining clips (2.0L) or bolts (2.5L) from the air cleaner cover.

Carefully remove the MAF from the cover.

To install:

On the 2.5L engine:

Replace the gasket between the MAF and the air cleaner cover.

Install the MAF onto the air cleaner cover and tighten the retaining bolts to 25 inch lbs. (3.5 Nm).

On the 2.0L engine:

Inspect the O-ring on the MAF and replace if necessary.

Install the MAF onto the air cleaner cover and attach the retaining clips.

Install the outlet tube onto the MAF and tighten the hose clamps.

Install air cleaner outlet tube and cover into place and attach the retaining clips for the cover and tighten the hose clamps on the throttle body(2.5L) or resonator (2.0L).

Attach the connectors on the IAT and the MAF sensors.

Connect the negative battery cable.

Idle Air Control Valve

OPERATION

The Idle Air Control (IAC) valve adjusts the engine idle speed. The valve is located on the side of the throttle body. The valve is controlled by a duty cycle signal from the PCM and allows air to bypass the throttle plate in order to maintain the proper idle speed.

The IAC is located at the top of the upper intake manifold adjacent to the throttle body.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 2, 3, 4


Fig. 2: Unplug the connector from the IAC valve




Fig. 3: Remove the two retaining bolts and ...




Fig. 4: ... lift the IAC valve off of the intake manifold


Disconnect the negative battery cable.

Disconnnect the wiring harness from the IAC valve.

Remove the two retaining bolts.

Remove the IAC valve and discard the old gasket.

To install:

Clean the gasket mating surfaces thoroughly.

Using a new gasket, position the IAC valve on the throttle body.

Install and tighten the retaining bolts to 71-106 inch lbs. (8-12 Nm).

Connect the wiring harness to the IAC valve.

Connect the negative battery cable.



And one more thing how old is the fuel filter ? If see's got some miles on her you may want to look it that too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
wow thanks strongt. Actually i found the problem. So looking at the car, i was like lets see the timing belt.

The timing belt tensioner seized up and caused the belt to strip. The engine timing is not off but just slowed down at idle by the stupid tensioner.

Im gonna get a new belt + tensioner tomorrow and get my neighbor (mechanic) to help me swap them out.

Its sucks cause i just had these parts replaced 10000km ago. However they are aftermarket so who knows.

The tensioner got stripped along with the belt and its a big mess in there since the tensioner basically lost about 1/2 inch in diameter when the spring lost power and hit the side wall. Ya its a lot of shredded plastic in there. After i took the top cover off I knew.

This car usually runs like a sowing machine, thats why i was so surprised with the sudden decrease in performance.

Thanks for ur help. I really appreciate it.
 
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