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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
New Bendix Brake Pads and Rotors advice? (56k warning: 3mb of pictures)

Hello all,

I have a 2000 Chrysler Concorde LX and I am replacing the rotors and brake pads on all wheels. However I am only doing the front for now. I ordered the following from partsamerica.com:

(2) Bendix Brake Rotors, Part No. 145198 for $71.48 each.
Bendix Brake Pads: TitaniuMetallic II™, Part No. MKD730 for $49.88.

It cost me a bit over $205 with tax for the whole thing.
Several questions:
Did I get the right rotors? I have the 16" wheels and the description was that these rotors are for the 16" wheels. I figured that was a no brainer but someone might know better.
Are these rotors worth it? There were some Weaver rotors for less than half the price of the the Bendix, but since I am getting the Bendix pads I went for their rotors as well. Plus they have a 2 year warranty so I figure I can replace them for new ones later on if needed?

Anyway enough with the silly questions, I want to get down to what is needed. I am expecting these to be delivered on Wednesday and I have devoted all day Thursday to do this project. This will be my first time changing brake pads and rotors. I have done quite a bit of research and please correct me in any area.

I have the Concorde Service Manual for the instructions so I think that will help me out.

I have an assistant (the gf) to help me later on with the bleeding of the brake fluid.

I bought a nice canopy from Walmart so that I can work in the shade. The sun is murderous down here in South Florida during the summer.

I have one of those hydrolic (sp) or pneumatic jacks with two stands. I plan on doing each wheel at a time so I will just use the jack on each side without using the stands.

I have the lug nut remover (the one that came with the car) So I will loosen the lugs a bit then jack the car up.

Remove the hubcap and wheel.

I don't have the service manual in front of me as I write this so I am just guessing: There are two bolts that I will have to unscrew to let the caliper loose. Let the caliper stand on something so it doesn't stress the brake line.

Then take off the rotor and any dust caps/bearings in the way.

Put the new rotor on and new pads in the caliper and put everything back together. I said this with less explination, but do I need any sort of grease/cleaner/threading stuff?

Also before the brake pads go on the caliper I will use a C-clamp to push the piston back, this is after I open the master cylinder and syphon some brake fluid out with a turkey baster.

After both wheels are done, I am looking to bleed the entire system with new fluid. What DOT am I looking for? Im sure its in the service manual, but just incase??

For this I plan on finishing the acutal rotor/brake job and putting the wheels all back in place, then removing the rear right wheel and start bleeding there? Then moving onto the rear left, front right, and finally front left. I have read that on newer cars that have break lines on different (something) you don't need to start in the RR. Does the 00 Concorde fall into this?

I probably forgot to ask some questions or mention things, I am at work now, I will come back to this post later in the evening.

Thank you all for reading and thanks in advance. :fun_06:
 
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Those be the correct parts! :)

Unless you're just changing a tire, it is NOT advised to do any work on your car with only a jack holding up the car. Put the car on jack stands. Since you are only replacing the fronts, you only need to put the front on stands.

A C-clamp is good to push the piston back in. Just make sure you put a block of wood between the C-clamp and the piston so that the C-clamp isn't contacting the piston. Also, it's a good idea to open the bleeder screw so that the fluid behind the piston goes out the bleeder screw, and not back up into the brake system. All the dirt collects at the lowest point in the system, which just happens to be the calipers. This is especially important if you have ABS.

Doing one side at a time is a good idea as the other side can be used as a reference guide.

The Wearever rotors may cost less, but they are also of lesser quality. They are basically a mid-grade line for the more price sensative crowd. We have our own mid-grade line (Bendix Global) as well. But I always say, for something as important as brakes, why go for budget components. The rotors you ordered are the premium rotors.

Some tips...

-Clean and grease the guide pins. Anti-seize will work. So will any silicone grease or molylube (or Bendix Ceramlub :) ).
-Clean/sand off the rust of the hub surface, and any points where the caliper and pads mount onto the car.
-Clean/sand the inside of the caliper where the pads touch the caliper.
-Put some grease (not anti-seize) on the hub surface (that's where the rotor will touch), and on any point where the pads make contact with either the car or caliper. Do NOT put grease on the friction surface!!!
-Since these pads come with shims already installed, do NOT use Permatex Disc Brake Quiet.
-I also put some grease (anti-seize will work) on the studs for easier lug nut removal in the future.
-Inspect the caliper for any leaking, the bushings for any cracking or looseness, and the hose for any leaking or cracking.

P.S. Nice choice on pads and rotors. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Warlord for all that.

I am thinking of doing a how-to-photo-walkthrough. Hopefully it doesn't rain too much.

Regarding bleeding brakes, I made a seprate post about this if you could throw some advice: Help with brake fluid flush and refill.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Update here..

I finished the front brake job today.... somewhat. The brake and rotor installation was a breeze for my first time, but the bleeding brake part.. well, thats just a PITA. I first was trying with wrong sized tubes, and when I finnaly got the right size tube but I got tons of brake fluid on my driveway, even with all the newspapers.

So I did the rear right wheels bleed and the rear left wheel's bleeder screw molded really easily into a circle. I can no longer turn it with a wrench or socket, is there a rebuild kit that has the bleeder screw part or do I have to buy a new caliper and do I need to get those in pairs or is a single ok?

I gave up at this point, I was flipping mad. I did manage to take a few snapshots of my work and I will be re-trying all day saturday.

I am hoping to make this into a how-to on the 2nd gen page since I didn't see a break change one. Let me know if I did it right according to pictures and descriptions.


Before you start, get some shade from the sun. If you want to get a nice job done with all the details, take your time and relax.

The gear:
1. Fan to keep cool
2. Socket kit
3. Paint can to hold the caliper from stressing brake line
4. Sand paper
5. Nitrile gloves
6. Jack
7. Wrenches
8. Shop Towels
9. Grease: Anti-Seize
10. Grease: non-anti-seize
11. Synthetic DOT3 brake fluid
12. Pliers
13. Funnel
14. Lug wrench
15. Brake cleaner
16. Turkey baster
17. Long wood block
18. Plastic tube (too large)
19. Empty gallon jugs from distilled water
20. Stand
21. Socket wrench

Using the lug wrench to remove lug nuts.

Here it is, remember this is the passenger side.

Sort the two screws hold the caliper.

Caliper off with the worn pads.

These annoying things hold the rotor from coming off easily.

Sanding the hub.

More sanding...

Caliper with pads off, piston has still not been moved.

Sanding of the caliper.

Get ready to push that piston back.

Before you do the caliper piston pushing, open up the brake fluid top.

Go ahead and mount your wood and c-clamp like so...

Close the piston all the way in.

Grab some grease (non-anti-seize)

Grease up the back of those shims for them to make greasy contact with the calipers. (Don't get grease on the friction pad)

Slide the outside pad in and push the inside pad into the piston bore.

Closer view.

Use the same grease on the hub to make contact with the inside of the rotor hat.

Get some brake cleaner ready for your new rotors.

After cleaning and mounting.

Camera battery dies. And it started pouring too so I had to shove the wheel back on. Ofcourse I mounted the caliper back on too using the two screws with anti-seize grease on them.

After it stopped raining and the driveway dried up a bit I went back to work on bleeding the brakes but I already said how that ended up.

Test drive:

My initial drive was great, pedal feel was the same as before the whole ordeal, however braking power was increased. I did ten 30 to 10 in the neighberhood and three 60 to 10 on the main road. The car stopped smooth and there was no shaking in the front end. I was completely pleased.

While driving back home I smelt something burning, a chemical type burn. I stopped and inspected, it came from the front brakes obviously. I parked for an hour. After driving 40 miles in the city with regular braking there were tons of squeeks and squeels coming off intermitently when going straight or stopping. I guess that is all in the first few days of brakes or I just did a poor installation.

I appreciate any input. Thank you all.
 
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BLASK02 said:
So I did the rear right wheels bleed and the rear left wheel's bleeder screw molded really easily into a circle. I can no longer turn it with a wrench or socket, is there a rebuild kit that has the bleeder screw part or do I have to buy a new caliper and do I need to get those in pairs or is a single ok?
Maybe I'm just not awake yet, but I'm not sure what you are trying to say. Are you saying you can't turn the bleeder screw loose, or that you can't put the bleeder screw back on?


As for the noise, are you saying you get noise even when you aren't applying the brakes?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The bleeder screw is for a size 10 wrench as stated in the service manual. My size 10 was a tad to big for it so I was using a 1/2. I don't know what I was using lol. Anyway, the part where the wrench is supposed to grab, well its no longer a hex, its a circle, since I shaved off all the corners while trying to turn it (I never took it off), therefore a wrench cannot grab it anymore.

I did find bleeder screws for $10 on partsamerica. I guess in order to replace the old one I have to detach the brake line from the caliper and plug it? Then somehow unscrew the old bleederscrew with pliers or something?

The noise part I get when pressing down the brakes. Not all the time.

I must have confused you when I said I get noise when driving down straight without applying brakes, I forgot to mention that before the whole brake job I got new tires and the new tires have some sort of rain sheild on them that push the hubcaps so each time the hubcap turns I hear a clonk. Thats random though and totally seprate from the brakes. (I am thinking of just riding w/o hucaps and paint the wheels and lugnuts satin black, but I need a cover for the bearings for the front wheels)

Thanks
 

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Maybe you just have to break them in? Or maybe you shouldn't have bought Bendix?? lol j/k warlord.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Another update.

So far the squeaking during braking is minimizing. I do hear slight noise while driving but its gotta be those darn hubcaps. I really want to go capless and paint the wheels and lugs satin black with a chrome cap in the middle, kind of like the caps in the rear wheels, why don't they have them on the front, can I get some sort of replacement?

I'm gonna buy four new bleeder screws and install them into the calipers tommorow and re-bleed correctly this time. Any tips on the bleeder screw installation?

Will post more pics.

Thanks :sleep:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok, I think this will be the last to final update on this.

I redid the bleed today on all wheels, everything went smooth this time around. I got 4 new bleeder screws and only replaced one on the rear left caliper - the installation was easy, since I couldn't use a wrench on it, I just used heavy pliers and just force-turned it. One budge and it came out with very little brake fluid. Screwed in the new screw and commenced bleeding!

All is well, brake pedal felt kinda spongy at first, but after some driving I feel there is improvement, no more weird feeling.

Overall the braking is great with the front Bendix brake/rotor combo, the pads in the rear look like they are at half life so I will delay in replacing those.

01Intrepid, thanks, I am going to submit a How To but I just want to make sure all my steps were done right. Like with the greasing, etc.

Thanks to everyone for the help and I will post an update soon after the initial brake in period.
 

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Nice lube job. :)

Did you put some lube on the surface where the edges of the pads (the ears) rest on the car? I couldn't tell by the pics. Did you sand that surface as well?

If for some reason the noise doesn't go away, please let me know. They shouldn't make any noise (or very little). You may just be getting some noise as the pads are being broken in.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Warlord187 said:
Did you put some lube on the surface where the edges of the pads (the ears) rest on the car? Did you sand that surface as well?
No and Yes

I didn't want to go to near the edges since they might have went over on the friction pad. I wouldnt even dare to go on the edges. I sanded the entire caliper so that it would be cleaner, every area got a good scrubbing.

PS

I wanted to know if the anti-rattle clips were supposed to be installed. They came with the pads and were on the old pads (only the right passenger, weird) but I couldn't figure out how they stay on.
 

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BLASK02 said:
I wanted to know if the anti-rattle clips were supposed to be installed. They came with the pads and were on the old pads (only the right passenger, weird) but I couldn't figure out how they stay on.
I've been meaning to take some pics of that (I think I actually have a fixture on a stand of this braking system), but I've had too much other things going on at work. I believe they install on the same surface that the pad ears rest, and the two tabs are placed inside the pads.
 

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I'll almost be willing to bet going with non-OE pads is going to cause squeaking down the road, even when your pads are fine.

I'm 99% willing to bet in 12-15k miles, your front rotors will warp again. At least you didn't waste your money on anything fancy.
 

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If you use new rotors, good ones - not the bottom of the barrel price Chinese replacement crap, and a good brand of pads the brake job will last for a good long time. The things that cause rotors to warp are if you ride the brake a lot, lots of real hard stopping (this is not a race car) or if the rotors have been turned - once you turn them, even a little, you have reduced the amount of material available to dissapate the heat generated when you step on the brake peddle.

As for the squeaking - even OE pads will squeak if not installed properly. You have to thoroughly clean all of the surfaces including the caliper piston and put a light coating of grease on all of the contact and sliding surfaces.
 

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This is possibly my biggest complaint with the car, although honestly my only complaint.

My OE's warped every 15k, as do my parts store ones. It made no difference in my type of driving. I got the most expensive parts store pads & rotors, which are still probably Chinese. My aftermarket "high perf" ceramic pads, when applied, grind a little when cold, and squeak after they get hot as if they are worn to the limiter. They actually stop the car a little better than OE, however looking back I probably should've stuck with OE parts.

The type of driving I do here is big city, rush-hour, mostly highway. I drive 27 miles one way... takes 35 minutes in the morning and 45 minutes in the evening. I don't tailgate or slam the brakes unless I have to. Fact is Intrepids & 2G LH's in general have a terrible reputation around here for warped rotors according to mechanics and parts store personnel who actually know what they're selling. Then again, certain other cars & trucks are just as bad.

Look at the factory warranty (12months/12k) - that should tell you something! I just accept the fact the front brakes are inadequate. So being a daily driver I take the cheapest competent way out and turn the pair when the vibration starts getting annoying ($16), and replace the pair (and pads) when @ min thickness. At least it's easy enough to do myself.
 

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Interesting. I have never had any warping issues, EXCEPT near the end of life on the OE rotors. I've used UBP and Bendix rotors with no issues.

I also have never had any noise issues, except for the current pads (Hawk HPS), and than that is only when they get hot and in slow, creeper, bumper-to-bumper traffic type stops. I have used two different OE pads and three different Bendix pads prior to this.

I am also extremely hard on my brakes. The R/T style rotors are supposed to minimize "warping" better.

The good rotors for our cars are made in Canada.

And you do know that a lot of the aftermarket brands (Bendix being one of them) supply the OE with their pads. We use what we learn on the OE side in the aftermarket.
 

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9 times out of 10 warped rotors are caused by incorrect lug nut tightening. Not the fault of the brakes.
If you have a shop that puts the lugnuts on with an air gun, find another shop.
The correct wayt to install a wheel is as follows:

1. make sure back of wheel and hub and brake rotor(if used) are clean of everything (lube ok as long as it new, old lube holds dirt and causes missalignments).
2. install rotor and caliper, be sure rotor will spin freely (no pressure from caliper)
3. Install wheel being sure to seat the wheel flatly against the hub/disk.
4. install lugnuts BY HAND or socket without rachet on it.
5. seat nuts to wheel and hub, by hand!
6. snug each nut with socket and wrench, just enough to hold the rim on (may 10-20 ft lbs) being sure to tighten them isn a CRISS CROSS pattern. Strike the tire firmly with your fist around the perimiter to be sure the rim seated corectly.
7. tighten to ~50 foot lbs in a CRISS CROSS pattern
8. tighten to ~80 ft/lbs in a criss cross pattern
9. lower tire just enough to make contact with ground (to hold tire for final torque)
10. tighten to 100 ftlbs in a criss cross pattern and lower care off jack and stands.

I have 160,000 miles on the original rotors and only 2 sets of pads, never warped one.

Air tools are great for REMOVING nuts and bolts, but in sensitive areas, aways install by hand and with the right tools.
 

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GR8WHT said:
1. make sure back of wheel and hub and brake rotor(if used) are clean of everything (lube ok as long as it new, old lube holds dirt and causes missalignments).
2. install rotor and caliper, be sure rotor will spin freely (no pressure from caliper)
3. Install wheel being sure to seat the wheel flatly against the hub/disk.
4. install lugnuts BY HAND or socket without rachet on it.
5. seat nuts to wheel and hub, by hand!
6. snug each nut with socket and wrench, just enough to hold the rim on (may 10-20 ft lbs) being sure to tighten them isn a CRISS CROSS pattern. Strike the tire firmly with your fist around the perimiter to be sure the rim seated corectly.
7. tighten to ~50 foot lbs in a CRISS CROSS pattern
8. tighten to ~80 ft/lbs in a criss cross pattern
9. lower tire just enough to make contact with ground (to hold tire for final torque)
10. tighten to 100 ftlbs in a criss cross pattern and lower care off jack and stands.
That's pretty much how I do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Amazing.

Thanks for the help everyone, you are all gonna get some reps :icon_mrgr

I am gonna re-do the whole job.

Jack the front up and take of the caliper and rotor - sand again very vigorously - grease really well, sand the caliper very well, and this time grease the pads in every milimeter (except the friction) and tighten with service manual specs. I got a hold of some nice torque wrenches so I will be able to know the weight now. (Before it was all by hand)

Also for the bleeding I am going to redo that as well with a proper hose since I was told that during bleeding there cannot be any air in the hose! DOH!

I was putting a hose on and the other end into a jar with fresh fluid, but the hose was letting air in on the bleeder screw side, obviosuly not tight enough.

I enjoy this on my day's off, I will surely post some more pics and make a complete walkthrough. I want to make one that is nub proof.

Thanks again :claps:
 
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