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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 95 intrepid- over heated the third day had water in it- cheacked it a few hours latter no water none on the ground- replaced thermostate added colant- drove for 30 min got oil change came home no fluid in resovor tank- my next step is to flush it- anything else i might try- trying to avoid big shop prices thnks
 

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first of all, when you filled it up, did you bleed the system to get the air out of it? I have seen it happen where there was an air buble and it was enought to buld pup resure and spray all of the coolant out of the overflow tank. The next thing I would check would be the oil. See if there is watter in the oil, if so it could be heads. If you can't tell if there is watter in the oil, you could also check the compresion. Just a couple of ideas to start the topic off with.
-Taaf-
 

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no water in oil just had it changed- dbl cheaked- may not have bleed all the way- just filled again will cheak in am and bleed when hot this time- it was not all the way cold but not warm when i bleed it the first time-
how do you cheak the compresion?
 

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baillie said:
no water in oil just had it changed- dbl cheaked- may not have bleed all the way- just filled again will cheak in am and bleed when hot this time- it was not all the way cold but not warm when i bleed it the first time-
how do you cheak the compresion?
Here you go:

Checking Engine Compression

See Figure 1

A noticeable lack of engine power, excessive oil consumption and/or poor fuel mileage measured over an extended period are all indicators of internal engine wear. Worn piston rings, scored or worn cylinder bores, blown head gaskets, sticking or burnt valves and worn valve seats are all possible culprits here. A check of each cylinder's compression will help you locate the problems.


Fig. 1: A screw-in type compression gauge is more accurate and easier to use without an assistant



A screw-in type compression gauge is more accurate than the type you simply hold against the spark plug hole, although it takes slightly longer to use. It's worth it to obtain a more accurate reading. Follow these procedures:

Warm up the engine to normal operating temperature.

Remove all the spark plugs.

Disconnect the high tension lead from the ignition coil.

Fully open the throttle either by operating the carburetor throttle linkage by hand or by having an assistant floor the accelerator pedal.

Screw the compression gauge into the No. 1 spark plug hole until the fitting is snug.


WARNING

Be careful not to crossthread the plug hole. On aluminum cylinder heads use extra care, as the threads in these heads are easily ruined.



Ask an assistant to fully depress the accelerator pedal. Then, while you read the compression gauge, ask the assistant to crank the engine 4 or 5 times in short bursts using the ignition switch.

Read the compression gauge at the end of each series of cranks, and record the highest of these readings. Repeat this procedure for each of the engine's cylinders.

A cylinder's compression pressure is considered within specification if the lowest reading cylinder is within 75% of the highest. The minimum acceptable pressure for these engines is about 100 psi.

If a cylinder is unusually low, pour a tablespoon of clean engine oil into the cylinder through the spark plug hole and repeat the compression test. If the compression comes up after adding the oil, it appears that the cylinder's piston rings or bore are damaged or worn. If the pressure remains low, the valves may not be seating properly (a valve job is needed), or the head gasket may be blown near that cylinder. If compression in any two adjacent cylinders is low, and if the addition of oil doesn't help the compression, there is probably leakage past the head gasket. Oil and coolant water in the combustion chamber can result from this problem. There may be evidence of water droplets in the oil film on the engine dipstick when a head gasket has blown.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thnks i replaced the cap on over flow tank and now its holding coolant- still have small leak ive yet to locacate better than it was thought
 

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Our cars will leak out of the overflow line running between the bottom and the top of the cap, its the only coolant hose that drains to the ground, not hard to find. I'll bet you lost all of the coolant out of there. I just went through this same issue this past weekend, new cap and refill+bleed fixed 'er up.
 
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