DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner

How often do you use the Autostick?

  • Almost always (>90%)

    Votes: 6 11.5%
  • A good bit of the time (60%-90%)

    Votes: 8 15.4%
  • About half the time (41%-59%)

    Votes: 13 25.0%
  • It's rare that I use it (10%-40%)

    Votes: 12 23.1%
  • Hardley ever (<10%)

    Votes: 13 25.0%
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,427 Posts
LHSer said:
That is incorrect. In any automatic transmission if you start in a higher gear (2 or 3 instead of D) the car will start in those gears, otherwise what would be the point of having the choice to select them.

on all 3 of the vehicles i've ever driven with a shifting arrangement such as this (01 camry, 81 chevy truck, 97 dodge truck) if you select a gear such as 2, the vehicle starts in 1st and won't shift higher than 2nd.

just adding fuel to the debate :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,427 Posts
SID96 said:
Oh,andn for the rookie again, redline is where the marks on your tachometer (RPM meter) are orange or red, meaning that if the needle is there for too long, your engine may overheat.

for the rookie (SID) - redline is marked on the tach as the engine speed at which the valvetrain may develop float and destroy itself. it has nothing to do with overheating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,427 Posts
oh lord....the valvetrain is the entire assembly of cams, valves, lifters, springs, you name it - all the stuff that makes the valves open and close when they're supposed to. if you get the motor spinning too fast, you run the risk of developing float, which is when all the parts aren't working in unison anymore because the hardware can't keep up with itself (if you understood that, bad explanation). you might get parts lagging or leading, maybe going up when they're supposed to be going down, etc and when you're talking about tolerances within thousandths of an inch, even a tiny amount of play or nanoseconds of mistiming can destroy your entire valvetrain.

i know that sucked, can anyone else explain it better?



texas r/t - from one texan to another - just trying to do my best to help :)


EDIT - here's some better definitions i found on the net, www.cartrackers.com:

Valve Float: A high-rpm engine condition in which the valve lifters lose contact with the cam lobes because the valve springs are not strong enough to overcome the momentum of the various valvetrain components. The onset of valve float prevents higher-rpm operation. Extended periods of valve float will damage the valvetrain.

Valvetrain: The collection of parts that make the valves operate. The valvetrain includes the camshaft(s) and all related drive components, the various parts that convert the camshaft's rotary motion into reciprocating motion at the valves, and the valves and their associated parts.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top