DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So as I'm sure many of you know, the Prizm's had a pretty hard life. Kansas heat, Massachusetts winters, being totaled by a moving truck, being hit by a stolen car, and now with over 200,000 miles on it. With all this added to the fact that the car is 16 years old, the paint has seen better days. The roof in particular has become very faded and oxidized. The trunk and rear bumper are as bad, but those are also from another car.

Since the spare driver's door for my Intrepid cleaned ups o well with the rubbing compound and waxes I had lying around, I decided to see how they'd work on the Prizm, and hopefully bring some life back into its paint.

Because the paint is in rough shape this is a project that will take several days to complete. Today I started with the roof.











































More to come!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I love the feel of freshly waxed paint..smoother than glass. You think paint is smooth normally until you'd do this, and then where you haven't worked feels gritty by comparison.

Tomorrow I plan to work on the trunk and rear bumper.
 

·
get off my lawn
Joined
·
15,505 Posts
great thing in past years, most cars used Acrylic Enamel, other than Metallics, a little elbow greese,, and some compound,, and poof,, a nice shine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I doubt it, it's technically a totaled car. I'm sure its worth squat, but I don't car. Like all my cars I never plan to get rid of it. Keep it going and keep it as nice as I can. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Oh, here's what the pad I used for the rubbing compound looked like after using it on just the roof yesterday.





Day 2: The trunk.

The trunk and rear fascia were pretty rough. The rear bumper could only do so much with since it has a lot of deep gouges, that's something that would need a repaint.

The trunk had lots of scratches and swirls on it, with not a whole lot of reflectivity or luster...until now.

























You can really see the difference. Next up is the hood.

This really makes me want to work on getting the rear quarter finished...I may just tackle it myself soon.

Since I was running out of the No.7 compound I switched to Turtle Wax Rubbing Compound today. Seemed to do a good job too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Funny thing is I'm not going as "by the book" as I'm supposed to. I don't have a clay bar so I didn't use one, I just washed and dried the car, then wiped it down with a microfiber towel.

I'm using a random orbital buffer I got several years ago from the parts store. It doesn't have any of those fancy pads like Porter Cables and more expensive buffers have, just microfiber cloth pads. Like one of these



I have 3 pads, an hand applicator pad, and a bunch of microfiber towels.

After I wipe the surface off I put a pad on the bugger, put some rubbing compound (these are the ones I used)





Put some on the pad, then spread it across the working area (2x2 or so), then turn on the buffer and go over slowly, steadily, and evenly. I long back and forth strokes.

After the compound is worked in I wipe it off with a clean towel (it says not to let it dry so I don't). Since the Prizm's paint was in such poor shape, I repeated this process 2-3 times depending on how bad the area was. On the final time I wiped it down a second time with a new cloth, making sure to get all of the residue off.

This step gets off the many of the scratches, haze, and oxidation. Once you're done the surface will look much smoother though it'll be a bit dull. That gets remedied with the next step.

After this I switched pads for use with the polish.



I repeated the steps as I did for applying and removing the rubbing compound.

This step give the paint its deep luster and shine. It makes the paint feel super smooth to the touch..love that feeling.

For the final step I used this:



This is the stuff that protects the finish.

I used a hand applicator (just like these)



and applied the wax to the the applicator, then spread it in a circular motions across the working areas, applying more as needed. Then I let it dry.

The last step was to use a clean buffer pad and remove the wax from the surface, going over multiple times with very light pressure, just letting the buffer glide over the surface.

And that's it! That's the process I've been using, and the results speak for themselves. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,464 Posts
Very Simple and the results are stunning. Meg's makes awesome products. I should open some of those bottles I have sitting in my basement. I bought a **** ton of stuff last year from them and have yet to use it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Turtle wax and Number 7 are good products too, they did a great job getting rid of a lot of the scratches and imperfections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Day 3:

Tackled the hood and front fascia today. The difference to the hood is not as noticeable, since I've worked on it before a few years ago, but still noticeable.























Couple shots of the finished areas.





If the weather isn't too bad tomorrow I'll tackle one of the sides, otherwise I'll wait until it cools down again on Friday or Saturday to finish it.

If anyone's interested I'll write a more in depth how-to once this is done.
 

·
That rhythm is INFECTIOUS.
Joined
·
18,595 Posts
Yeah man - that's awesome. It's a labor of love, for sure. Looks great! For me, it would require a long, 70-degree weekend, and a load of patience (which I'm short on!). :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I know what you mean about the weather. It's hotter and more humid today and will be until Friday, so I'm putting the project on hold until then. Just too uncomfortable.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top