DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner
1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Farticcus of Plenticcus
Joined
·
17,030 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Group,
On my way home from Gallipolis, OH yesterday, I snapped some pics of the temp gauge while driving to prove the effectiveness of having the 160 t-stat installed on the open road.

On Wednesday, I installed a "one hole" 160* t-stat into the M. I previously had a "two hole" 180* installed. With the warm weather, it the car was increasingly runner hotter than I wanted. I have a number of 160's in stock, so I installed one. For coolant, I used a mix of distilled water and Zerex G-05 in approximately a 70/30 ratio.

Here are the results (as can be verified by the odometer readings in chronological order)

First, and foremost, the external ambient temperature:


Car sitting in a BP (while I checked the tire pressures) with fans having just started running:


The next picture was taken 16 seconds later, fans just shut off. Note the drop in the temperature:


This photo was 4 minutes later, and a mile down the highway:


1 minute later:


Another minute later:


Another minute later:


I put the heat on high, and my fan switch on low for a mile or so to see if I can use some thermal management and lower the temperatures any farther:




The temperature did drop a little more. At this point it was probably in the 165* - 170* range

IMPG reading at this time


10 seconds after the IMPG reading:


A minute after that:


Current readings from the other gauges:


25 seconds after the gauge readings:


2 minutes later:


A minute later:


Another minute later:


Nearing the end of the trip (within 20 miles of home and 2 hours after the last picture)


The last picture was me sitting in a drive through less than a mile from home.


The car will heat up, but on the open road it will cool down quickly.
A cooler running motor will produce more horsepower, and run more efficiently. Using my scan tool, I have determined that (in my car) when the temp gauge is in that range, it is running between 168* and 175*

Hope this helps.
 

·
Farticcus of Plenticcus
Joined
·
17,030 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I believe a user on here named squishy made the pillar. IDK about the gagues themselves.
Squishy makes them, but he didn't make this one.
I had that pillar done at Spade Kreations here in Cincy.

Rhett, those are the AutoMeter NV Gauges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,448 Posts
So how much fuel mileage are you sacrificing to run cooler? I can't compare my M to yours but my Trep was getting 30-32 mpg on average. I don't see the benefits for everyday driving.
 

·
Farticcus of Plenticcus
Joined
·
17,030 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So how much fuel mileage are you sacrificing to run cooler? I can't compare my M to yours but my Trep was getting 30-32 mpg on average. I don't see the benefits for everyday driving.
umm, I'm not sacrificing any fuel mileage.
My first full tank with the 160* installed I averaged 22.1
Which is a little higher than what I have been averaging
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,340 Posts
A cooler running motor will produce more horsepower, and run more efficiently.
Cooler combustion air helps produce more horsepower, but not a cooler engine. An extreme counter-example would be immediately after cold start. What kind of gas mileage do you get before the engine warms up?

I believe there are trade-offs in being too cold or too hot. 160*F is too far to the cool side, in my opinion. Why not go to 150*F, if cooler is better?

<moments later>
Not fighting here, just discussing...)
</end>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,239 Posts
Cooler combustion air helps produce more horsepower, but not a cooler engine. An extreme counter-example would be immediately after cold start. What kind of gas mileage do you get before the engine warms up?

I believe there are trade-offs in being too cold or too hot. 160*F is too far to the cool side, in my opinion. Why not go to 150*F, if cooler is better?

<moments later>
Not fighting here, just discussing...)
</end>
You are correct that the statement isn't perfect that cooler is better. There are trade offs at every temperature and what you want is to optimize the different factors for the best results. The thing to keep in mind is that a 160 degree T stat doesn't mean your car will run at 160 degrees.

Also I know that 160 degrees is the point where oil fully lubricates properly, so that would seem to be a good bottom end for how cold an engine should go. I think there are a lot of factors but using lower T stats is a very common practice and on some engines yields great results while others not so much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,239 Posts
does anybody know if i can get a 160 degree stat for my 1st gen?
I don't know if I'd try going that low for a first gen, the computer might get pissy about that. First gen cars have a 195 t stat and have iron block engines. Getting a lower T stat could still be a good mod, but I wouldn't drop that far.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top