DodgeIntrepid.Net Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings, I hope everyone is having a good day so far.

I seem to have a problem with my rear turn signals no longer functioning on my 2004 Dodge Intrepid. I also tried my hazards and they don't work on the rear either. I've checked almost all fuses related to the turn signals and hazards and they all seem to be good.

Researching the problem, its recommended that I swap out the relay flasher with a fresh one. However, I'm not too sure where it is... I think its above the brake petal but I'm not too sure.

Is the relay flasher underneath the white box circled in the picture? If so l, how can I remove the white box? Thanks in advanced!

 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,791 Posts
I took your photo and added a green, blue, and yellow circle onto the flasher components - see below.

Green circle = factory original flasher, abandoned in place, still attached to the connector panel, factory socket removed (you can see the factory original flasher's male terminals)

Yellow circle = NAPA flasher (possibly an LM470) someone added to replace the factory original flasher - the markings indicate for trailer and LED BULBS?

Blue circle = factory socket unplugged from factory original flasher and plugged into NAPA flasher

Factory original flasher, NAPA flasher, and factory socket are all black.


41849


Almost no aftermarket replacement flashers work correctly in our cars. Some brands blow fuse O in the PDC (in engine compartment) or fuse 9 in the Junction block (behind cover on driver's end if dash) when the hazards are turned on - unless you clip (cut) off one of the flasher's terminals - crazy! Check fuses with an ohm meter - visually checking them is not reliable - you can have a blown fuse that looks good.

IF someone didn't replace the tail light bulbs with LEDs, AND if your factory original flasher is still good, your best bet would be to plug the flasher socket back into the factory original flasher. If LED bulbs are installed, you may be better off reverting back to incandescent 3157's and plugging the original flasher back in.

Make sure the correct tail light bulbs (3157) are installed.

Are tail light bulb or socket terminals corroded from moisture? Once corrosion sets into electrical terminals, things can get flaky. Make sure bulbs are fully mated to their sockets. Are the bulbs burned out?

There is a harness connector at each tail light assembly - make sure their terminals are not corroded and that the connectors are fully mated.

There is a single black ground wire for all the tail lights - this is a single-point failure for all the tail lights. Connects to the floor of the car underneath the driver's seat - make sure that's plugged in.

After trying the advice above, post back with the results, and if still problems, we'll take it one step at a time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: happybuny005

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I took your photo and added a green, blue, and yellow circle onto the flasher components - see below.

Green circle = factory original flasher, abandoned in place, still attached to the connector panel, factory socket removed (you can see the factory original flasher's male terminals)

Yellow circle = NAPA flasher (possibly an LM470) someone added to replace the factory original flasher - the markings indicate for trailer and LED BULBS?

Blue circle = factory socket unplugged from factory original flasher and plugged into NAPA flasher

Factory original flasher, NAPA flasher, and factory socket are all black.


View attachment 41849

Almost no aftermarket replacement flashers work correctly in our cars. Some brands blow fuse O in the PDC (in engine compartment) or fuse 9 in the Junction block (behind cover on driver's end if dash) when the hazards are turned on - unless you clip (cut) off one of the flasher's terminals - crazy! Check fuses with an ohm meter - visually checking them is not reliable - you can have a blown fuse that looks good.

IF someone didn't replace the tail light bulbs with LEDs, AND if your factory original flasher is still good, your best bet would be to plug the flasher socket back into the factory original flasher. If LED bulbs are installed, you may be better off reverting back to incandescent 3157's and plugging the original flasher back in.

Make sure the correct tail light bulbs (3157) are installed.

Are tail light bulb or socket terminals corroded from moisture? Once corrosion sets into electrical terminals, things can get flaky. Make sure bulbs are fully mated to their sockets. Are the bulbs burned out?

There is a harness connector at each tail light assembly - make sure their terminals are not corroded and that the connectors are fully mated.

There is a single black ground wire for all the tail lights - this is a single-point failure for all the tail lights. Connects to the floor of the car underneath the driver's seat - make sure that's plugged in.

After trying the advice above, post back with the results, and if still problems, we'll take it one step at a time.
Hey, THANKS so much for your reply!

We managed to get them working. It seems who ever owned the car before us slathered bulb grease into the terminal and it appeared to melt (or something) and blocked the contacts. After cleaning some of the grease out and reconnecting the bulb the turn signals now work. Any idea what may of happened? Thanks a ton! :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,791 Posts
Generally a good electrical-grade silicone grease in bulb sockets is a "good thing" as a protection against corrosion. Socket terminals in good condition have enough spring tension to press through the relatively thin electrical-grade grease to make intimate electrical contact between socket terminal and bulb base and surround the non-contacing areas with the protective coating to block out air/oxygen and moisture.

Possibly either the terminals are weak due to having been mechanically sprung, overheated, or corroded, OR, perhaps more likely, the grease used was thicker than a good-quality electrical-grade silicone grease and therefore would take a little more pressure to "press through" it than the socket terminals are designed to provide. I know I have some synthetic silicone grease that is more for mechanical purposes and is quite a bit thicker than the dielectric electrical-grade grease, and I have to be careful not to grab it for electrical socket use because it is too thick. However, either type will work well for coating of insulating boots (ignition wires, coils, and spark plug connections) to seal any air gaps to prevent path-of-least-resistance high-voltage arcing to ground, and generally those types of connections are forceful enough to press through the thicker grease to make the required electrical connections vs. the lighter-duty bulb socket terminal connections.

I guess Advance Auto Parts and other parts stores still have the foil packs of dielectric or "bulb socket" grease hanging on small racks near the cash registers. Those are nice to keep handy in the garage. And they also have larger squeeze tubes of the same stuff more for a commercial shop use. Generally both of those are a quality grease of a nice thinner and smooth consistency.

While I'm pontificating in the subject of greases on our cars, I generally use axle grease (marine-grade preferred) to coat battery posts and cable terminals for protection against battery acid and corrosion. The pressure of the cable clamps is definitely enough to press thru that grease, and there's not the concern there for reacting with the rubber or plastic insulating materials of most other electrical connections.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top