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It's simple really. Jack up the car by using a floor jack. Jack it up where the cradle bolts together. Use jack stands in the OEM location for the jack to secure it. The starter is located on the bottom driver side where the engine mates to the transmission. It's ether 13mm or 15mm for the bolt size. It's only three bolts and a 10mm nut to remove the battery cable and the solenoid wire just clips off. Some people prefer to remove a engine mount for more space so if you plan to do that use the floor jack again with a block of wood under the oil pain, unbolt the driverside engine mount and jack it up enough to remove the mount.
 

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T hanks for the info i really apreciate it but it turned out to be one of the starter wires just came loose from its clip but still looked like it was in there. Thanks again.
 

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Well even if he didnt need the info i really do, im starting to jack it up now, is it best to remove wire first or the three bolts first. Thank you for the help
 

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Thread necromancy but this one was Duck Duck Go relevant when I searched for something similar. I just did this job. Its probably best to remove the wiring first.

My order w/o safety warnings like be safe with your jack stands:

Raise car

Undo negative battery cable

Undo heat shield, it has two 8m bolts and one nut. There is one top rear that is somewhat a pain.

See if you can't remove the wiring from your bad starter carefully, my fitting broke. Long bent needle-nose for the solenoid plug and a few different shaped 13 mm wrenches / sockets for the battery cable. This requires some dexterity. The battery cable could be 2cm longer, it is too tight in my opinion but whoever owned Chrysler that day saved $.10 per vehicle. I'm angry about this, it was a waste of time not making America better.

There are three fifteen mm bolts holding on the back of your starter. loosen up the bottom one but do not remove. Remove the middle one and the ground wire which is in the way of the top bolt. Remove the top bolt.

Do what you have to do to get the starter and shim out of there w/o destroying the shim. It is not very easy to get out but it does come out w/o lifting the engine or anything. Pay attention to how the ship comes out.

Installation is almost reverse of removal. I wrestled for a few with the battery cable. The best method would probably be to guide the new starter and cable together before bolting on the starter.

Don't mess up the orientation of the shim.

As a side note, I checked the threads in my Remy replacement starter but did not drive the bolts in all the way. I had to shorten my top bolt for some reason to get it to thread the last 7.5mm or so.

Starter sounds great. I'm hunting down a new solenoid plug because mine broke and while it does function it can't be the best of connections for snow and slop.
 

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Thread necromancy but this one was Duck Duck Go relevant when I searched for something similar. I just did this job. Its probably best to remove the wiring first.

My order w/o safety warnings like be safe with your jack stands:

Raise car

Undo negative battery cable

Undo heat shield, it has two 8m bolts and one nut. There is one top rear that is somewhat a pain.

See if you can't remove the wiring from your bad starter carefully, my fitting broke. Long bent needle-nose for the solenoid plug and a few different shaped 13 mm wrenches / sockets for the battery cable. This requires some dexterity. The battery cable could be 2cm longer, it is too tight in my opinion but whoever owned Chrysler that day saved $.10 per vehicle. I'm angry about this, it was a waste of time not making America better.

There are three fifteen mm bolts holding on the back of your starter. loosen up the bottom one but do not remove. Remove the middle one and the ground wire which is in the way of the top bolt. Remove the top bolt.

Do what you have to do to get the starter and shim out of there w/o destroying the shim. It is not very easy to get out but it does come out w/o lifting the engine or anything. Pay attention to how the ship comes out.

Installation is almost reverse of removal. I wrestled for a few with the battery cable. The best method would probably be to guide the new starter and cable together before bolting on the starter.

Don't mess up the orientation of the shim.

As a side note, I checked the threads in my Remy replacement starter but did not drive the bolts in all the way. I had to shorten my top bolt for some reason to get it to thread the last 7.5mm or so.

Starter sounds great. I'm hunting down a new solenoid plug because mine broke and while it does function it can't be the best of connections for snow and slop.
[/QUOTE

How important is the shim?
 

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How important is the shim? I'd make sure I used it. Seemed thicker than others.

Starter shims keep them starter teeth lined up with the flywheel. No shim and they can bind up or grind eachother into pieces. Tearing up your starter is the 2nd worst thing that can happen. I'd hate to tear up my flywheel. I'm just gonna assume you'll have to get the motor and transmission at least a few inches apart if that happens.
 
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