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Discussion Starter #1
timing belt is off.

the engine was just turning when i had the belt on.

obviousely i wasnt going to vice-grip the cam....

the FSM doesnt seam to have any help, ive been in and out of the timing section
(pages 1124-1140)

and the engine section.. they have the special tool info..

am i supposed to be using special tool 6642 to hold the cams for me?
 

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That rhythm is INFECTIOUS.
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Yes. Definitely need the Miller tool bolted to the backside of the head to hold the cam in place while you pull the bolt on the front.
 

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I hit **** with sticks!
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Yep, x2, thats the tool you use. Critical step to use it.
 

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If I'm understanding what you guys are saying, I'm going to disagree in spite of my never having had the cam sprockets off of my 3.2 (2.7 - yes, 3.2 - no).

That tool is *not* intended to take the full torque of tightening and loosening the sprocket bolt. The FSM says to do that with a box end wrench (36mm) on the hex on the front of the sprockets. The tool is strictly to keep the cam in the correct position while the cams are otherwise free to turn, and to align the cams while re-installing the sprocket bolts with the timing belt holding the sprockets in position (with crank mark set). The torque of loosening and tightening the sprocket bolt is to be taken by the wrench on the sprocket, not by the special tool.

While it is installed during the looseing and tightening of the sprocket bolt, I think it would be a mistake to subject the alginment tool to the loosening or tightening torque. It's not intended for that.

If I'm misunderstanding what you guys are saying, I apologize ahead of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If I'm understanding what you guys are saying, I'm going to disagree in spite of my never having had the cam sprockets off of my 3.2 (2.7 - yes, 3.2 - no).

That tool is *not* intended to take the full torque of tightening and loosening the sprocket bolt. The FSM says to do that with a box end wrench (36mm) on the hex on the front of the sprockets. The tool is strictly to keep the cam in the correct position while the cams are otherwise free to turn, and to align the cams while re-installing the sprocket bolts with the timing belt holding the sprockets in position (with crank mark set). The torque of loosening and tightening the sprocket bolt is to be taken by the wrench on the sprocket, not by the special tool.

While it is installed during the looseing and tightening of the sprocket bolt, I think it would be a mistake to subject the alginment tool to the loosening or tightening torque. It's not intended for that.

If I'm misunderstanding what you guys are saying, I apologize ahead of time.
im glad you understood what i was thinking. that little nub didnt look like it could take all my OOMPH..
 

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seams like its just short of $70. can i get away with just one?

..i feel like im probably going to need 2 for the timing on the re-build.
I see no reason you couldn't do one cam sprocket at a time. Anybody see it differently?

Someone posted a dimensioned drawing of the tool a couple of years ago - you could have a machine shop make it. I'll see if I can find it.

EDIT - See post no. 15 here: http://www.dodgeintrepid.net/showthread.php?p=1667864#post1667864
 

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I've taken them off using the tool, probably not the best of ideas because there's a lot of torque involve in getting tht bolt out. Either way, the tool was fine when I did finally get the bolt out. I was able to get a pair of the holders for under 50$ shipped. Order them directly from miller irc.
 

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I've taken them off using the tool, probably not the best of ideas because there's a lot of torque involve in getting tht bolt out..
I'm also not crazy about applying that much torque thru the length of the cam either.
 

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the tool may be a nice thing to have, but I will say from experience that it is not a necessity
If the sprockets aren't removed, it's definitely not. But if R&R'ing the sprockets, how do you get the cams timed properly to the belt and sprockets without the alignment tool?
 

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If the sprockets aren't removed, it's definitely not. But if R&R'ing the sprockets, how do you get the cams timed properly to the belt and sprockets without the alignment tool?
remove the timing belt and let the can detent out... Mark the great and timing cover in a few places for indexing. Remove gear, take a picture of the cam for reference on where the indexing is of the cam relative to the cover... When assembling, line up the same way and tighten?

Sent from my SCH-S720C using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #13
the tool may be a nice thing to have, but I will say from experience that it is not a necessity
i was 99% sure i needed it to EASILY time this thing when i get the parts back from the machine shop...

so your right its going to be needed later.
i had a couple of my neightbors lean onto a adjustable (crescent)wrench on the nut part of the cam and i was leaning on the breaker bar amd still had no luck, so maybe airtools are needed?
 

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WOW! Imagine that much torque on the cam itself - and on that alignment tool!
 

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I would not recommend using the cam alignment tool as a stop to remove the cam bolt.

The pin on the alignment tool is only 0.2 in diameter. It's meant to hold the cam in proper timing.

Here's what I used when the cam bolt was removed. The Wife got some foreman action in too. :D

 

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...Here's what I used when the cam bolt was removed. The Wife got some foreman action in too. :D

It might be worth taking a 36mm axle nut socket and grinding some flats on it for a solid, straight-on grip with a larger adjustable or open end, and then slip a 3/8" extension thru the square drive hole of that socket with a socket on the end to fit the sprocket bolt - similar to what's done on strut rod nuts.
 
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