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I see that Rusty 69 posted some similar info. while I was typing. :thumbsup:

Are you using a 12 point or 6 point socket on the pulley bolt? If you’ve only tried a 12 point, a 6 point could work even if the head is a little rounded.

Some of the damper pulley puller kits include a holder tool which prevents the pulley and crankshaft from turning when tightening or loosening the bolt. You might take a look at the free loaner puller kits that Advance or O’Reillys have to see if they have the holder.

The holder is the donut-shaped part in the right side of the photo of this kit - the three posts engage the pulley spokes, and you plug a 1/2” breaker bar in the square hole of the holder tool to keep the pulley from turning:


Sorry - I’ve never owned or worked on a first gen, so I don’t know how long the fan assembly mounting bolts are. I know I always warn people to make sure to re-use the same fan mounting bolts and not swap them with similar bolts from other locations on the car that might be longer because they could easily punch a hole in the plastic radiator side tanks. I wouldn’t think you could reliably patch a hole like that - you likely need a new radiator. Yeah - either one of the bolts got swapped with a longer bolt, or as you said, somethings different about the replacement assembly or there’s a spacer or washer that is missing.
 

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You’re welcome.

I know that on 2nd gen., longer fan mounting screws definitely would punch a nice hole - IIRC, the tips of the factory bolts are aimed right at the plastic end cap walls, with a gap of 1/8” or less.

It is pretty typical of the plastic side tanks to develop cracks and eventually split open on the 2nd gens. - no reason to expect different from 1st gen., and of course they’re even older than 2nd gen. On 2nd gen. radiators, a crack typically develops vertically on the rear of the passenger-side end cap (where the coolant comes in at its hottest) 1/2” to an inch from the clamping band.

I used a strap wrench wrapped around the harmonic balancer to hold it in place. With a breaker bar it came out pretty easily.
The risk in that is that if you’re applying a lot of torque (which it didn’t sound like was needed), you can start the outer ring and inner ring of the pulley slipping on the rubber separator between them and getting the outer ring out of alignment (for proper belt tracking).
 

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...From the looks of things, I'd say the water pump is seeping a bit after viewing a small pool of coolant in recessed areas of the block...
A question for others that know a lot more than me, especially since this is a first gen.: Does the first gen. also have the two coolant connections between the rear timing cover and the block that are known to get corroded and seep coolant onto the front of the block?

If that’s the case, it would involve more work to fix it, but now would be the time to determine that and fix it. I don’t know if that could be some of what you are seeing, or if you have to remove the rear timing cover to even tell. If it is leaking, it could be just that the rubber ring gaskets have rotted, or, more commonly, the engine block and/or the timing cover metal is severely corrosion pitted. If that’s the case, the corrosion where the ring gaskets mate has to be sanded or ground down and the sealing surfaces approximated using J-B Weld.

I’m not looking for you to borrow trouble and don’t want you to have to take more apart just to find out if there’s even a problem, but you are seeing seepage which may or may not be just the water pump seal. Hopefully someone can chime in that can tell you if you can and how to assess without unnecessarily opening up a can of worms.

So I just pulled up the diagram from the ‘93-‘96 parts pdf, and it looks to be similar if not identical to those two rear timing cover-to-block coolant connections on 2nd gen. Item 7 is the rubber ring gasket (qty. 2) that goes between rear timing cover and block.



 

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Again, I’ve never worked on or owned a first gen., but I can look at pictures in the parts pdf. A gasket behind the crankshaft sprocket should be on the oil pump. Are you maybe seeing coolant residue that has dropped down from above?
 

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I've done a 94LHS 2X, 95LHS, , 02 Treps 4X. I've had it both ways. Some fired right off, but I do remember that one of the last two I did on 02 Treps, I had to crank on it and hold my foot to the floor to get it to catch, and then feather it for a minute or so before it would idle on its own. I did disconnect the battery on both, but only one had trouble firing off. Can't explain why the diff.
Perhaps a slight but normally not noticeable leakdown of fuel back into the tank thru the fuel pump check valve, leaving the fuel line and rails full of air that had to burp it’s way out thru the injectors. (Similarly one or more slightly leaky injectors could have emptied the fuel rails into one or more cylinders - at first start up, some cylinders could be fuel starved, others could be flooded.) The ones that didn’t need the bit of run time to smooth out either had a tighter check valve (and/ or injectors) and/or simply didn’t sit as long between when they were last shut down and we’re fired up again after the belt job was finished.

May or may not be the case, but a theory that could explain it.
 

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Maybe a few off / on key cycles could remedy this?

I remember hearing my '92 Caravan pumping fuel into the throttle body before ignition, so I'm assuming the Concorde does the same, although I don't recall hearing it.
Yes - these cars run the fuel pump for a second or so each time the key is turned to the Run position (fuel goes to the fuel rail/injectors rather than to the throttle body), and then the fuel pump is kept off until the PCM detects that the engine is actually running on its own.

Cycling the key can make the difference between starting and not starting with an empty rail. If there has been leakdown thru the check valve or injector(s), there will still be some rough running for a few seconds after it starts even with the key cycling, but will not be as severe or as for as long duration as if you don’t cycle the key. Again, some combination of cylinders will be flooded and fuel starved depending on the cause of the leak down.
 

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if you do replace the rad hoses, it helps to have those special spring-type hose clamp pliers to reach in those tight spaces. You can get them online for about $15 ea.
I much prefer the cable-type hose clamp pliers. Their working end are much easier to orient and fit into tight spaces to engage the clamps - see photo below. They also have a locking mechanism to hold the clamps in the expanded condition so you’re free to use both hands and focus on getting the clamp into the desired position before releasing the cable (by pressing the red-tipped lever in the photo).

Putting a very light film coating of silicone grease on the hose OD can make slipping the clamp in place a little easier.

You would be right to re-use the factory clamps - though harder (some would say impossible) to work with (unless you have good hose clamp pliers), they make much more reliable hose connections by keeping constant spring pressure evenly around the hose circumference to compensate for compression set of the hose rubber.

$30-to-$40 price range appears to be the sweet spot for the cable-type clamp pliers. The cheaper ones don’t operate as smoothly, and if the cables are made cheaply, they break after a couple of uses:
 

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Those or the lisle hose clamp vises.
Interesting! I had never seen those before, but a quick search brought them up. They could be useful. Real world use would be needed to see if they would have limitations on a car in some clamp orientations and locations that maybe the cable-type pliers could get into better. The cable-type pliers would certainly be much quicker in squeezing and releasing of the clamps. Maybe would be worthwhile to have both in the arsenal of tools.

 
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