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You’re welcome.

I know that on 2nd gen., longer fan mounting screws definitely would punch a nice hole - IIRC, the tips of the factory bolts are aimed right at the plastic end cap walls, with a gap of 1/8” or less.

It is pretty typical of the plastic side tanks to develop cracks and eventually split open on the 2nd gens. - no reason to expect different from 1st gen., and of course they’re even older than 2nd gen. On 2nd gen. radiators, a crack typically develops vertically on the rear of the passenger-side end cap (where the coolant comes in at its hottest) 1/2” to an inch from the clamping band.

I used a strap wrench wrapped around the harmonic balancer to hold it in place. With a breaker bar it came out pretty easily.
The risk in that is that if you’re applying a lot of torque (which it didn’t sound like was needed), you can start the outer ring and inner ring of the pulley slipping on the rubber separator between them and getting the outer ring out of alignment (for proper belt tracking).
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I went back to the garage, and sure enough, the kit had the studded ring tool to keep the pulley from turning, and I had no trouble removing the balancer with said tool, but I did hear a bit of a pop when the pulley broke free. I hope that's not a bad sign of things, but the pulley appears intact to me.

From the looks of things, I'd say the water pump is seeping a bit after viewing a small pool of coolant in recessed areas of the block. Is it necessary to coat the new pump O-ring with silicone during installation?

Also, how much more effort to replace the oil seals? (I was going to upload some pictures, but that option seems to be missing at the moment) The belt area could use some cleaning, although the belt itself looks great for wear.

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Getting back to the radiator, I was right the first time. There are puncture holes in tank sides. A local radiator shop looked the screws, and said they were *not* factory issue. The shop gave the correct size for free however.
 

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Unless they are causing a noticeable seep then I'd leave them alone. Unnecessary time, effort, and possibility of causing more harm than good. Should be fine installing the waterpump seal dry. I honestly prefer the OEM seal since it is a softer rubber that conforms better to the surface texture and has ribs to help hold it in the groove, but I've used both before. The old belt can't be judged by appearance, the structural cords are concealed by the rubber and are flexed back and forth continuously, they will become fatigued.
 

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...From the looks of things, I'd say the water pump is seeping a bit after viewing a small pool of coolant in recessed areas of the block...
A question for others that know a lot more than me, especially since this is a first gen.: Does the first gen. also have the two coolant connections between the rear timing cover and the block that are known to get corroded and seep coolant onto the front of the block?

If that’s the case, it would involve more work to fix it, but now would be the time to determine that and fix it. I don’t know if that could be some of what you are seeing, or if you have to remove the rear timing cover to even tell. If it is leaking, it could be just that the rubber ring gaskets have rotted, or, more commonly, the engine block and/or the timing cover metal is severely corrosion pitted. If that’s the case, the corrosion where the ring gaskets mate has to be sanded or ground down and the sealing surfaces approximated using J-B Weld.

I’m not looking for you to borrow trouble and don’t want you to have to take more apart just to find out if there’s even a problem, but you are seeing seepage which may or may not be just the water pump seal. Hopefully someone can chime in that can tell you if you can and how to assess without unnecessarily opening up a can of worms.

So I just pulled up the diagram from the ‘93-‘96 parts pdf, and it looks to be similar if not identical to those two rear timing cover-to-block coolant connections on 2nd gen. Item 7 is the rubber ring gasket (qty. 2) that goes between rear timing cover and block.



 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
This morning, I saw some coolant seepage at the top of gasket behind the crankshaft gear. That area appears to have flat gasket instead of an O-ring. I put some Bar's stop leak into the radiator about two months ago. Would it be bad idea to add another bottle, or should I replace the gasket, and can the gasket be removed without disturbing the whole rear timing belt cover?

I can remove things, but I'm a bit gun-shy about removing the cam pulleys - if need be.
 

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Again, I’ve never worked on or owned a first gen., but I can look at pictures in the parts pdf. A gasket behind the crankshaft sprocket should be on the oil pump. Are you maybe seeing coolant residue that has dropped down from above?
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 · (Edited)
I finally installed the pump and belt kit today, and I managed to get very good tension on the belt before pulling the tensioner pin.

However, when the previous owner changed the belt about 10 years ago, the timing marks (before I pulled the old belt) looked to be at the edge of tolerance, so I moved the passenger-side cam clockwise one tooth, and now the timing marks look better positioned than before.

For the record, what can I expect when I start the car for the first time? Will the engine idle rough until the computer relearns the new belt / tooth placement? If so, how long does that take?

Here's the old timing marks for what it's worth...
 

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Quite often the timing mark on the passenger side cam will point more towards one mark or the other. Sometimes they will be perfectly centered but otherwise the mark closest the middle of the engine is preferred as the timing will stay within the marks as the belt ages and stretches. Yours was probably centered between the marks at one time.

As long as your timing marks are all aligned it should start up just like normal
 
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