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I've done a 94LHS 2X, 95LHS, , 02 Treps 4X. I've had it both ways. Some fired right off, but I do remember that one of the last two I did on 02 Treps, I had to crank on it and hold my foot to the floor to get it to catch, and then feather it for a minute or so before it would idle on its own. I did disconnect the battery on both, but only one had trouble firing off. Can't explain why the diff.
 

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I've done a 94LHS 2X, 95LHS, , 02 Treps 4X. I've had it both ways. Some fired right off, but I do remember that one of the last two I did on 02 Treps, I had to crank on it and hold my foot to the floor to get it to catch, and then feather it for a minute or so before it would idle on its own. I did disconnect the battery on both, but only one had trouble firing off. Can't explain why the diff.
Perhaps a slight but normally not noticeable leakdown of fuel back into the tank thru the fuel pump check valve, leaving the fuel line and rails full of air that had to burp it’s way out thru the injectors. (Similarly one or more slightly leaky injectors could have emptied the fuel rails into one or more cylinders - at first start up, some cylinders could be fuel starved, others could be flooded.) The ones that didn’t need the bit of run time to smooth out either had a tighter check valve (and/ or injectors) and/or simply didn’t sit as long between when they were last shut down and we’re fired up again after the belt job was finished.

May or may not be the case, but a theory that could explain it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 · (Edited)
Perhaps a slight but normally not noticeable leakdown of fuel back into the tank thru the fuel pump check valve, leaving the fuel line and rails full of air that had to burp it’s way out thru the injectors. (Similarly one or more slightly leaky injectors could have emptied the fuel rails into one or more cylinders - at first start up, some cylinders could be fuel starved, others could be flooded.) The ones that didn’t need the bit of run time to smooth out either had a tighter check valve (and/ or injectors) and/or simply didn’t sit as long between when they were last shut down and we’re fired up again after the belt job was finished.

May or may not be the case, but a theory that could explain it.
Maybe a few off / on key cycles could remedy this?

I remember hearing my '92 Caravan pumping fuel into the throttle body before ignition, so I'm assuming the Concorde does the same, although I don't recall hearing it.
 

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Maybe a few off / on key cycles could remedy this?

I remember hearing my '92 Caravan pumping fuel into the throttle body before ignition, so I'm assuming the Concorde does the same, although I don't recall hearing it.
Yes - these cars run the fuel pump for a second or so each time the key is turned to the Run position (fuel goes to the fuel rail/injectors rather than to the throttle body), and then the fuel pump is kept off until the PCM detects that the engine is actually running on its own.

Cycling the key can make the difference between starting and not starting with an empty rail. If there has been leakdown thru the check valve or injector(s), there will still be some rough running for a few seconds after it starts even with the key cycling, but will not be as severe or as for as long duration as if you don’t cycle the key. Again, some combination of cylinders will be flooded and fuel starved depending on the cause of the leak down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 · (Edited)
Got the new radiator in (not an easy thing to do working between the AC condenser and the auxiliary transmission cooler lines :eek:), but I am having trouble starting the top fastener on the passenger side of the AC condenser. The area is tight, and I have big hands. Pulling the headlight off will give me room, but I am not sure about the screw locations as of this writing.

The bottom condenser screws are installed, but the (top) driver's side mounting bracket broke off during removal of the radiator. Is there an adhesive on the market that I can use to reattach the AC condenser bracket with?

Also, I am thinking strongly about replacing the bottom radiator hose (including the upper hose too), however, these 3.5 engines are so tight on space, I am not sure I can remove the factory hose clamp without removing the power steering pump. My hands are so scratched up, it looks like I have been in a cat fight after reinstalling the radiator.
 

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boy, if you're going to replace the lower radiator hose, you might as well replace the thermostat, too. I had one spontaneously stick closed on me, and I think it contributed to further engine damage later. It's a real b!tch to replace, and I wouldn't blame you if you didn't, because I know you have to draw the line somewhere.
 

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if you do replace the rad hoses, it helps to have those special spring-type hose clamp pliers to reach in those tight spaces. You can get them online for about $15 ea.
I much prefer the cable-type hose clamp pliers. Their working end are much easier to orient and fit into tight spaces to engage the clamps - see photo below. They also have a locking mechanism to hold the clamps in the expanded condition so you’re free to use both hands and focus on getting the clamp into the desired position before releasing the cable (by pressing the red-tipped lever in the photo).

Putting a very light film coating of silicone grease on the hose OD can make slipping the clamp in place a little easier.

You would be right to re-use the factory clamps - though harder (some would say impossible) to work with (unless you have good hose clamp pliers), they make much more reliable hose connections by keeping constant spring pressure evenly around the hose circumference to compensate for compression set of the hose rubber.

$30-to-$40 price range appears to be the sweet spot for the cable-type clamp pliers. The cheaper ones don’t operate as smoothly, and if the cables are made cheaply, they break after a couple of uses:
 

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Those or the lisle hose clamp vises.
Interesting! I had never seen those before, but a quick search brought them up. They could be useful. Real world use would be needed to see if they would have limitations on a car in some clamp orientations and locations that maybe the cable-type pliers could get into better. The cable-type pliers would certainly be much quicker in squeezing and releasing of the clamps. Maybe would be worthwhile to have both in the arsenal of tools.

 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Finished the job, and the car appears to be running great.

However, I failed to properly vent the cooling system, which caused the engine to run hot, briefly, and I lost about 1/2 gallon of antifreeze in the process.

To remedy the problem, I attached a clear tube to the vent valve, ran the other end of the hose into an antifreeze bottle, and ran the car until the air was purged. Seems like the 3.5 engine is bad about vapor lock unless one properly vents the system via the tiny check-valve located on the thermostat housing.

Can't thank you folks enough for your help here!
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
boy, if you're going to replace the lower radiator hose, you might as well replace the thermostat, too. I had one spontaneously stick closed on me, and I think it contributed to further engine damage later. It's a real b!tch to replace, and I wouldn't blame you if you didn't, because I know you have to draw the line somewhere.
I replaced it a few years ago after the car wouldn't get up to the proper operating temperature.

On first generation 3.5 engines, the thermostat is the easiest thing to get to, as it is located on the front of the motor.
 

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you can tell if you have burped the air-lock out of the coolant system by monitoring the temp gauge, and feeling for heat coming out of the defrosterash vents. If you are not getting heat out of the dash vents, you have not fully purged the air out. I have a steep driveway, which I've found works great for burping the air out.
 

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I know this is an old thread, but I'm posting here in case somebody winds up here when searching. I recently finished this job and learned a couple of things in the process. I removed the A/C condenser, the radiator, and the fan assembly (I do believe that I could possibly do it next time by removing only the fan assembly).:

1.) I first tried to do the job without removing the crank pulley. I know people have done it, but I wasn't able to put the new belt on with it in place. I "rented" a crank harmonic balance puller from Autozone (https://www.autozone.com/loan-a-too...ft-damper-harmonic-balancer-puller/391370_0_0). I lost a couple of days because the employee where I picked it up explained incorrectly how it worked. I finally found the proper way by researching it online. It was quite simple once I understood how the tool operated.

2.) I rotated the crank to Top Dead Center and my camshaft timing marks were correctly aligned. Unfortunately, while I was installing the new belt, the driver side cam sprung to about 120 degrees past where it was supposed to be. Initially, I panicked; but then discovered that all I needed to do was rotate the cam back into position with a long breaker bar (which I had someone else hold while I routed the new timing belt). I may look into finding a tool that will lock the cams into position for the next time I do this job.

After these experiences and acquiring some new knowledge, I feel I could probably do the entire process in less than an afternoon.
 

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I've used some plastic (house)door shims, which I break off at the correct thickness to jam in there between the belt on the left cam sprocket and the timing rear cover casting to hold the belt/cam sprocket/crank sprocket in proper position so you can free up both hands to further route the belt around the w. pump & rt cam sprocket. I've also used a little midget c-clamp to help hold the sprocket/belt/cover "sandwich" tight.
 
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