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Discussion Starter #1
Looks like I need some new front rotors. Can anyone recommend some good bang for the buck rotors that last a while and also get you stopped in a decent distance. I'm on a bit of a budget but my biggest problem is that I live in Atlantic Canada and its hard to get a lot of stuff here so rotors from Canadian sources are what I need as cross border shipping is usually big $$$

Also I'm thinking of installing them myself (first attempt at ever doing this) so any tips would be appreciated, even stuff that you might consider common knowledge, a detailed how too would be great if one exists.
 

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Here's the How-To on the Rotor, and also one on the pad's too:

Brake Disc (Rotor)

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 1, 2 and 3


Fig. 1: Unbolt the caliper and hang it with with wire or a bungee cord out of the way




Fig. 2: Carefully tap the side of the rotor if necessary to aid in removal




Fig. 3: Pull the rotor straight off the axle hub



Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel being worked on.

Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the appropriate wheels.

Remove the caliper guide pin bolts and remove the caliper/brake pad assembly. Do not disconnect the brake line. Support the caliper assembly by hanging it off of the steering knuckle or strut with a strong piece of wire to prevent strain on the brake hose.

Remove the rotor from the hub assembly by pulling straight off wheel mounting studs.

Inspect the brake rotor for the maximum allowable runout. Inspect the brake rotor for excessive lining deposits or corrosion. Resurface or replace the rotor if any of these conditions apply.

To install:

Clean both sides of the brake rotor with a brake cleaning solvent. Install the brake rotor onto the hub assembly.

Install the brake caliper. If installing a new rotor, compress the caliper piston back into the caliper bore to provide clearance for the rotor. It is good practice to remove some (one-third to one-half) of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir to avoid fluid overflow as the piston pushed fluid back through the brake lines into the master cylinder and reservoir.

Tighten the caliper guide pin bolts to 17 ft. lbs. (22 Nm).

Install the wheel and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

Lower the vehicle and tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern sequence to 95 ft. lbs. (129 Nm).

Pump the brakes several times to seat the brake pads against the brake rotors before attempting to move the vehicle.

Road test the vehicle to verify good brake performance.


Brake Pads

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

See Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9


Fig. 1: Once the tire and wheel assembly are removed, you have access to the caliper




Fig. 2: Remove the caliper guide pin bolts




Fig. 3: Separate the caliper from the rotor




Fig. 4: Support the caliper with a wire, so the brake hose does not become damaged




Fig. 5: Pry the retaining clip on the outboard pad ...




Fig. 6: ... then slide the pad off the caliper




Fig. 7: Pull the inboard pad away from the piston, until the retaining clip is free from the piston cavity




Fig. 8: Note the two pads are different, do not interchange them




Fig. 9: When installing the pads, slide them into place



Remove some (one-third to one-half) of the brake fluid from the reservoir. As the caliper piston is pushed back into the caliper, brake fluid will be pushed back through the lines, back into the master cylinder and fluid reservoir, possibly causing the reservoir to overflow.

Loosen the lug nuts on the front wheels.

Raise the vehicle and support safely. Remove the front wheels.

Remove the caliper guide pin bolts.

Before removing the caliper, use a large C-clamp to press the piston back into the caliper. This will prevent possible damage to the caliper piston.

Remove the caliper assembly by swinging the top part of the caliper away from the brake rotor edge, then lift the caliper assembly up.

If the caliper is not being removed for replacement or overhaul, hang the caliper with a strong piece of wire from the strut spring to prevent damage to the brake hose.

Remove the outboard brake pad by prying the brake pad retaining clip over raised area on the caliper. Then slide the pad down and off the caliper.

Remove the inboard brake pad by pulling away from piston until the retainer clip is free from the cavity in the piston.

To install:

Lubricate both the caliper mating surface and the machined abutment surfaces with multi-purpose lubricant.

Before brake pad installation, be sure to lightly coat the outer backing plate surface of the new brake pads with a disc brake pad anti-squeal lubricant.

Install brake pads into the caliper assembly making sure both pads are seated securely onto the caliper.

Install the caliper assembly back into position over the brake rotor and install the caliper guide pin bolts. Tighten the caliper guide pin bolts to 17 ft. lbs. (22 Nm).

Install the wheels and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

Lower the vehicle and tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern sequence, to 95 ft. lbs. (129 Nm). Top off the master cylinder to the appropriate level, using DOT 3 type brake fluid only.

Before moving the vehicle, pump the brakes until a firm pedal is obtained. Road test the vehicle to make sure the brake operation is normal.
 

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Ya, don't buy China rotors, be sure and get US made one's.

I used Wagners and have worked well, but their not the cheapest...
 

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dodgerunner you sure you dont mean parts from china. Japan has good metal. Anyway like he said either get US or Canandian made try raybestos or bendix. Cheap rotors usually equals **** performance and longevity.
 

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mass04 said:
dodgerunner you sure you dont mean parts from china. Japan has good metal. Anyway like he said either get US or Canandian made try raybestos or bendix. Cheap rotors usually equals **** performance and longevity.
LoL ! Also throw in Mexico too. I try to buy everything good old USA !!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Unbelievable, I checked all the big local places (UAP, NAPA, Shur-Fit, CDN Tire) not one of them carried (or could order) a single rotor that was not made in China, even the premium grade rotors. On a side note the most expensive premium grade rotor available in the city cost $68.79 each while the local Dodge dealers all wanted $118.99 each for thier standard mopar rotors, CRAZY eh.
 

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So, have you decided to go with one yet ? If so which one ? As for made in China, that sounds about right, some day China will buy a island somewhere and name it USA just so they can just put a label on that says USA !! :squarewin
 

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IntrepidSportDriver said:
Unbelievable, I checked all the big local places (UAP, NAPA, Shur-Fit, CDN Tire) not one of them carried (or could order) a single rotor that was not made in China, even the premium grade rotors. On a side note the most expensive premium grade rotor available in the city cost $68.79 each while the local Dodge dealers all wanted $118.99 each for thier standard mopar rotors, CRAZY eh.
Best Buy and Lordco are the two biggest carries of Bendix in Canada. However they only carry friction (no rotors).

The Canadian market is mostly filled with hardparts (rotors, drums, etc) out of China. That's the nature of the market I'm told.

If you give me your vehicle info I can tell you what the part numbers are and should be able to tell where they are made. If you tell me where in Canada you are, I may be able to offer you more options as far as where to go to get premium.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm in southern New Brunswick so Lordco and Bestbuy aren't an option for me, I live in a seriously part deprived area. Regardless I'm running out of time to get this done and my finances are stretched as tight as a piano string, so I picked up some cheapo rotors from Canadian Tire that were on sale for $21 each. I know, I know I'm going to regret it the first time I try to stop and I'll be replacing them again in 6 months but they will have to do for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK I've looked at the how-to for installing new rotors that was posted above and I think I must have missed something. It looks like a simple 10 minute job that anyone could do but all the local garages say they charge 45 minutes labor for the job...is there something compicated and time consuming about this that I've missed???


I did have one thought, there is a section in the how to that says "Install the brake caliper. If installing a new rotor, compress the caliper piston back into the caliper bore to provide clearance for the rotor."

Does this simply stay put once compressed or is there some procedure I have to follow to keep it from uncompressing and rubbing against the rotor constantly. Also what is the best way to compress the caliper piston?
 

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IntrepidSportDriver said:
OK I've looked at the how-to for installing new rotors that was posted above and I think I must have missed something. It looks like a simple 10 minute job that anyone could do but all the local garages say they charge 45 minutes labor for the job...is there something compicated and time consuming about this that I've missed???


I did have one thought, there is a section in the how to that says "Install the brake caliper. If installing a new rotor, compress the caliper piston back into the caliper bore to provide clearance for the rotor."

Does this simply stay put once compressed or is there some procedure I have to follow to keep it from uncompressing and rubbing against the rotor constantly. Also what is the best way to compress the caliper piston?
I think that they say to compress the piston after you install a new rotor, because the thickness maybe thicker that the old one that you had on. And the piston should stay compressed, and after you get everthing back together, the pad on the piston will stay alittle away from the rotor just like it did before. And I just use a C-Clamp and a small block of wood, to compress my pistons. But if you are putting new pads on, I skip the block of wood and use the old pad to use the clamp with.
 

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why didnt you just order some online and have them shipped to you? Its also a good idea to put some antiseize on the front of the hub(in between the wheel studs) so the rotor wont get stuck to the hub. I think they say 45 minutes because between taking the tires off, taking it apart, cleaning everything and then putting it back together; it will take some time. Dont rush! Also you should put some lubrication on the back side of the pads to prevent noise. And you should lubricate the caliper pins.
 

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Like I posted before, www.rockauto.com, you could have a good set of Raybestos PG PLUS for $39 (made in USA) in 3 or 4 days:

RAYBESTOS Part # 76316R
Rotor Only, REAR {5 Bolt Holes, 10 41/64" Diameter - Red Label} More Info
$9.69 $0.00 $9.69
RAYBESTOS Part # 76831R
Rotor Only, FRONT {Red Label} More Info
$11.68 $0.00 $11.68
GUARDIAN Part # 52125309
Front {Brake Rotor} More Info
$14.27 $0.00 $14.27
GUARDIAN Part # 52125306
Rear {Brake Rotor} More Info
$15.54 $0.00 $15.54
RAYBESTOS Part # 1076316
[REAR ROTOR] Originally Equipped with Noise Dampening Iron; Rotor Only {5 Bolt Holes, 10 41/64" Diameter - RAYMOLD} More Info
$16.60 $0.00 $16.60
RAYBESTOS Part # 1076831
[FRONT ROTOR] Rotor Only {RAYMOLD} More Info
$32.79 $0.00 $32.79
RAYBESTOS Part # 76316
[REAR ROTOR] Originally Equipped with Noise Dampening Iron; Rotor Only {5 Bolt Holes, 10 41/64" Diameter - PG PLUS} More Info
$36.89 $0.00 $36.89
RAYBESTOS Part # 76831
[FRONT ROTOR] Rotor Only {PG PLUS} More Info
$38.79 $0.00 $38.79
WAGNER Part # BD125306
Rear {Brake Rotor} More Info
$39.79 $0.00 $39.79
WAGNER Part # BD125309
Front {Brake Rotor} More Info
$43.79 $0.00 $43.79
ACDELCO Part # 18A550
ROTOR,RR BRK DURASTOP; ROTOR ONLY; ROTOR ONLY-FULL CAST SOLID {#18028150} More Info
$44.79 $0.00 $44.79
ACDELCO Part # 18A924
ROTOR,FRT BRK DURASTOP; ROTOR ONLY-FULL CAST VENTED {#18039987} More Info
$46.79 $0.00 $46.79
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So far I have had good luck with the Autozone rotors that I got for the Wifes's 94 intrepid. paid about 26 bucks apiece. put them on Christmas Eve "Merry Christmas sweetie, you can stop your car again" along with new pads and calipers.

Something that I ran into was one of the rotors was rusted or fused to the hub, no amount of beating or prying would free it. I used PB blaster on it, I heated it up w/ a torch, nothing would work. ended up going and renting a 11" gear puller. it was a chore to remove even with that. The other rotor fell off as soon as I removed the caliper.

AJ
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Big3 said:
Like I posted before, www.rockauto.com, you could have a good set of Raybestos PG PLUS for $39 (made in USA) in 3 or 4 days:
Well any site with .com is American and like I posted before I live in Atlantic Canada. Shipping car parts across the border generally takes a long time and costs a boat load of cash, even with cheap USPS there are border taxes and duties and with UPS or Fedex there is also usually a $40-$50 charge per package called a "border negotiation fee" or a "divisional transfer fee".
 

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I just replaced both of the front rotors with some Slotted & drilled ones, and It feels different... like, I gotta take more power to push the petal farther in order to stop... anyone know why that is?
 

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Hey bro, hello from Nova Scotia!

Check out NAPA. I asked for 2002 300m special rotors and got the "gucchi" center vented rotors for 43 bucks a piece. Canadian dollars, not US.
They list the same part number for a 2000 rt as well.
From what I can tell from word about, these resist the warping problem that the LH bodies tend to exhibit better than the "normal" rotor. Mine haven't warped yet and braking is fine. I'm a little easier on my brakes than most or right now though, as my original rotors warped so badly that the whole car would shake violently when braking from highway speeds. It was so bad I started to plan ahead to be slowed enough by lifting off the throttle so I wouldn't be going too fast when I needed the brakes.

Good luck

BJ
 
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