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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Howdy, folks.

Need some help. I let my '02ES sit for a bit too long over the summer and it seems the brake lines have rusted out. On a job like this, I don't know if it's anything I want to mess around with myself. Can you guys give me an idea of what the cost would be to re-fit all the lines to be sure things don't "go bump in the night?"

The alternative would be to just sell 'er to someone who has the skill to do the work for a couple bucks and move on...
 

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Woober Goobers!
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Are they leaking or are you worried about the rust only?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Leaking. I could see a stream of fluid squirting out of at least one line. The biggest hint was when my foot went to the floor.

Sent from my HTC 10 using Tapatalk
 

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I believe most of the brake lines are still available from the dealer. Have you contacted your local dealer about pricing and availability? Probably at least $200 for the brake lines alone. Most likely more if you factor in the Brake master Cylinder to Proportioning Valve or ABS Controller depending on which you have.

Benefit of the lines from the dealer is they'll be pre-formed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, figure $2 bills for the hardware, but again, I'm not sure if I want to try doing this on my own. So, what would one expect a mechanic to charge for such a job?

My thinking is that because the car needs new tires all the way around, a new radiator (that, too, sprung a leak in early spring), and brake lines that for the amount it'd cost me to fix all of that, it might make sense to just sell her for whatever I can get, plus what it'd cost me to repair the car, and put it toward something new.
 

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Move on!

Enjoy those car payments!
 

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So, figure $2 bills for the hardware, but again, I'm not sure if I want to try doing this on my own. So, what would one expect a mechanic to charge for such a job?

My thinking is that because the car needs new tires all the way around, a new radiator (that, too, sprung a leak in early spring), and brake lines that for the amount it'd cost me to fix all of that, it might make sense to just sell her for whatever I can get, plus what it'd cost me to repair the car, and put it toward something new.
We can't tell you what a mechanic would charge for these repairs. Take it to a shop(s) for an estimate and then determine your next step.

Car repair prices are different across the Country.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
We can't tell you what a mechanic would charge for these repairs. Take it to a shop(s) for an estimate and then determine your next step.

Car repair prices are different across the Country.
You surely could guess at a range, no? The part where the brakes don't work makes it a bit hard to just roll it in for an estimate.
 

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I was reading some of your old threads.
Your car has maybe 140 - 150k miles now (maybe more)

If you don't do the work yourself it's going to cost you a small fortune.

I'd scrap it and move on. Time to get a Challenger or a Charger!!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was reading some of your old threads.
Your car has maybe 140 - 150k miles now (maybe more)

If you don't do the work yourself it's going to cost you a small fortune.

I'd scrap it and move on. Time to get a Challenger or a Charger!!
154,760 to be exact.


My mechanic charged about $900 for it. $200 went into the brake lines
That's pretty much the range I figured.

Thanks for the feedback, guys. Not sure what I'm going to do here. There are plenty of Certified Pre-Owned cars out there at a decent price, especially if I consider it'd cost me a couple grand to get the ol' gal back on the road.

Assuming I just move on, what would you guys do with the present car? The engine is still running strong - I guess for a High School or College kid with some aptitude it might be a worthwhile fix-er-upper. Would you think $500 is too much to ask?
 

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154,760 to be exact.



That's pretty much the range I figured.

Thanks for the feedback, guys. Not sure what I'm going to do here. There are plenty of Certified Pre-Owned cars out there at a decent price, especially if I consider it'd cost me a couple grand to get the ol' gal back on the road.

Assuming I just move on, what would you guys do with the present car? The engine is still running strong - I guess for a High School or College kid with some aptitude it might be a worthwhile fix-er-upper. Would you think $500 is too much to ask?
$500 might be a fair price. Which motor, and how's the body?
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
$500 might be a fair price. Which motor, and how's the body?
She's an '02ES - 3.5 liter, leather interior, moon roof, tranny OK, body in good condition - though I did accidentally back into one of those cement filled parking lot poles that caved in the right rear bumper. Other than that, she runs like a top... it's the stopping part I have a problem with. ;-)

Here are a couple shots from when I brought her home. Obviously she doesn't look like this at the moment... but she could, in the right hands for the guy who has the time and skill to do the work.
 

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She's an '02ES - 3.5 liter, leather interior, moon roof, tranny OK, body in good condition - though I did accidentally back into one of those cement filled parking lot poles that caved in the right rear bumper. Other than that, she runs like a top... it's the stopping part I have a problem with. ;-)
I might be interested myself. My kid is starting college with no car and I'm not looking forward to driving him to and from campus. I'd have to drive down with a hauler to get it, but I can think of no finer choice for a first car than a trep.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I might be interested myself. My kid is starting college with no car and I'm not looking forward to driving him to and from campus. I'd have to drive down with a hauler to get it, but I can think of no finer choice for a first car than a trep.
Gotta say, I have to agree. The Intrepid is a great car. Maybe I just have a fondness because a '99ES was my first new car ever. But when maintained, they're reliable, not bad on gas, comfortable on highways, and crikey - what you can manage to fit in the damned thing with those fold-down rear seats! Give her a little TLC and she could look like new.

Just be aware that in addition to the brakes, she'll need new rubber, probably rear brakes and maybe hub bearings. But if you want, I still have a couple injectors, a 'Slap Stick' and power driver seat from my '99 I can toss into the deal. Not that I'm trying to twist your arm, or anything... ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Come to think of it, I'm wondering if there might not be a way to temporarily patch the leak using a segment of rubber hose split lengthwise to cover the leak, tightened down with a couple hose clamps to get her to a new home. Might be worth giving it a shot. Something to look into for this weekend.
 

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Come to think of it, I'm wondering if there might not be a way to temporarily patch the leak using a segment of rubber hose split lengthwise to cover the leak, tightened down with a couple hose clamps to get her to a new home. Might be worth giving it a shot. Something to look into for this weekend.
I've done that before in a pinch. You have to use the type of same reinforced rubber hose that's made for brake lines. It makes a decent although temporary band-aid, but it's safer to just put in new lines front to back.
PM me some pics of the car. If she looks good, I can make some time to come and get her.
 

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If you have to make a panic stop, the line will rupture. I had severely rusted lines - not even leaking. Had to make a moderately hard stop when a truck 3 cars ahead of me suddenly stopped to make a left turn with no warning. A line ruptured from the pressure, and half my brake system suddenly dumped its fluid and was useless. Fortunately there was just enough room to the car ahead that I stopped just soon enough, but there was some adrenaline involved.

My point is that if there was leaking, the walls elsewhere are heavily pitted and extremely weak. Big risk if something gets in your way at any time. I was lucky. The driver ahead of me noticed my dilemma in his rear view mirror and made room for me.
 

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My two cents' worth re DIY brake lines: I'm the original owner of a 1989 Isuzu Trooper, and the main line to the rear brakes popped a couple of weeks ago as I was stopping for a red light. Lost ALL my brakes. Fortunately, was able to turn onto a sidewalk instead of shooting into cross traffic on a busy arterial -- only injured a couple of pedestrians :)

I decided to take a stab at replacing the line myself. Bought a $15 double-flare kit from Harbor Freight and a coil of copper/nickel brake line thru Amazon. Also, you'll need a "mini" tubing cutter. That copper/nickel stuff is really nice -- easy to bend by hand, without much risk of kinking, and because it's softer, the cheapo HF tool also holds it more securely for flaring than it does the harder (and cheaper) steel brake lines.

There's quite a learning curve on making the flares (including remembering to slide over the brake nuts BEFORE making the flare!), and I butchered several of them and had to redo them on the vehicle (it's a good idea to leave yourself some slack for do-overs).

But all that aside, it wasn't that tough a job. I'm planning on selling the Trooper because the tin worm is eating up the doors, fenders and rocker panels (I live in northern Virginia/DC suburbs, where they use ridiculous amounts of road salt.) but if I was keeping it, I'd replace all the lines myself without any qualms. I've already found a replacement for the Trooper, a 1995 Ford Explorer with only 75k and a new transmission, and I'm going to replace all the brake lines before I put it back in service.

PS: I wasn't altogether happy with the brake line I bought because the wall thickness was inconsistent -- not too thin, but too thick, meaning I had to do some filing before the tubing would accept the flaring "button." Next time, I'll probably try to find something that's higher quality. But LOVE the copper-nickel, which will almost certainly outlast the rest of the truck.

I started another thread a couple of months ago describing my tribulations with bleeding my Intrepid's brake lines, including the ABS (which allegedly require a dealer diagnostic tool to do properly). Was able to do it myself with a creative approach, and I'm happy to report the brakes are still excellent. So go for it!
 
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